Consecration of Chalice, Athame or Other Tool (Solitary)

Consecration of Chalice, Athame or Other Tool

Before these assembled spirits I bring (name type of tool) to be dedicated to the service of the Lady and Lord.

(Pass tool three times through smoke of the incense.)

By the power of air, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to purity of thought and to harmlessness that all intentions for which thou art used may harm none and be for the good of all.

(Pass tool three times through or over the flame of the fire candle.)

By the power of fire, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to purity of desire and to harmlessness that all goals which thou doest help achieve may harm none and be for the good of all.

(Take a few drops of water and sprinkle or dab on instrument.)

By the power of water, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to purity of emotion and to harmlessness that all that thou shalt be used in a spirit of harmony, harming none and for the good of all.

(Touch instrument to the stone or salt in north quarter)

By the power of earth, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to steadfastness and purity of purpose, that my will be achieved without wavering, with harm to none and for the good of all.

(If this is a chalice, present it first to the Lady, then to the Lord, if athame, reverse order. All other instruments use personal preference, but it is courtesy to present them to Her first.)

PRESENTATION FOR CHALICE:
Lady Freya, Keeper of Femininity, bless this chalice. Let it be as Thy cauldron, a vessel of productivity that it may be worthy to dispense Thy bounty. Let it be used in Thy service and in the service of humanity. Let it be so bound that no harm may come of it to any being, but let it rather be an instrument of goodwill and understanding; of loving harmony. To Thy sacred self I dedicate this vessel, (name of vessel), that it and I may long be of service to Thee.

Lord Thor, companion to the Lady, champion of the Gods, bless this chalice and keep watch over it. Guard the works which come forth from it, that they ever be in the service of Thee and Thy Lady, that they be of service to humankind, and that they abide by the laws of harmony. To Thee I vow I shall use it for Her sacred purposes, and for no other.
So mote it be.

PRESENTATION FOR ATHAME:
Lord Thor, thunderer & hammer wielder, bless this athame. Let it be as the spring rains which fall upon the Earth to cause Her to bring forth Her bounty.

Let it quicken my hopes and dreams, yet keep them from causing harm. Let it guide them in the harmony of the seasons, bringing forth only good for all. Lord Thor, bless this athame, (name of athame), that it be used ever in the worship and honor of the Gods.

Lady Freya, companion to the Thunderer, lover of the Gods, bless this athame that it shall bring forth joy, and shall cause no pain nor disharmony to any. I dedicate this athame (name athame), symbol of the Defender and Rain Maker, to Thy service. May it ever bring Thee joy and pride.

So mote it be.

(This ritual, with suitable changes, may be used to dedicate other tools as well as these.)

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Tool Blessing Ritual (Coven)

Tool Blessing Ritual

A purification of objects for ritual use and their transformation into magical items.

(The area is prepared by placing a quantity of each element in the proper quarter, as well as preparing the altar in the usual way. If available, a cauldron (empty) is placed in the center of the circle. Candles are placed at each of the four corners and lit, progressing deosil from the east. Salt and water are blessed, and the celebrants are purified with them. A magic circle is cast, and watchtowers summoned. The god is then drawn down as follows:
The priest stands before the alter in the Osiris position, arms crossed across chest and feet together. The Priestess kneels before him with face and arms upraised.
)

PS: Hephaestus, forger of magic,
descend upon this the body of thy priest and servant,
lend us the strength of your arms.
Prometheus, shape of man,
descend upon this the body of thy priest and servant,
lend us your fire and foresight.
Morpheus, weaver of dreams,
descend upon this the body of thy priest and servant,
lend us your subtlety and vision.
P: I am he, the shape-god,
forger, builder, artisan, smith.
With strength and craft I form the world.

(The Priest helps the Priestess to rise and she stands in the center of the circle in the god position, extending her arms outward and down, palms facing forward. The Priest kneels before her with head bowed.)

P: Clotho, spinner of the strand of life
Descend upon this the body of thy priestess and servant.
Lend us your wheel of making.
Hecate, caster of spells,
Descend upon this the body of thy priestess and servant.
Lend us the power of your magic.
Aphrodite, goddess of love,
Descend upon this the body of thy priestess and servant.
Grant us eros, philos, aristos, agape.
PS: I am she, the weaver-goddess,
Painter, poet, sculptor, witch.
With art and love I form the world.

(The priestess extends her hands to the priest and helps him rise. The priest cups both hands and scoops from the cauldron, then offers to the priestess.)

P: Drink now from the cauldron of Cerridwen, whose draughts bring knowledge, peace and life.

(The priestess sips from the cupped hands, after which the priest drinks. The objects to be blessed are taken from the altar by the priest and moved widdershins to the west quarter, and immersed in the water there.)

P: Spirits of the west, in water born
In cool waters cleanse these tools
And wash from them all hurt and harm
This I ask, this charge I lay,
By oak and ash and bitter thorn.

(The objects are moved by the priestess to the south quarter and moved above the flames there.)

PS: Spirits of the south, in fire born
In shining flames purify these tools
And burn from them all impurities
This I ask, this charge I lay,
By oak and ash and bitter thorn.

(The objects are moved to the east quarter by the priest and moved through the incense smoke.)

P: Spirits of the east, in sweet air born
In swirling winds polish these tools
And sweep from them all phantasm and illusion
This I ask, this charge I lay,
By oak and ash and bitter thorn.

(The objects are moved to the altar by the priestess, and placed upon the pentacle.)

PS: Spirits of the north, in cool earth born
In mother earth ground these tools
And take from them all spirits dark
This I ask, this charge I lay,
By oak and ash and bitter thorn.

(The person consecrating the tools now offers an impromptu or prepared charge to the items, stating their purpose and mode of use. They are then taken up by the priestess and moved to the east quarter.)

PS: Spirits of the east, from the bright air come,
Fill these tools with the swirling energies of the whirlwind
Make them float like the breeze
Spirits of air, hearken unto me,
As I do will, so more it be.

(The tools are now taken up by the priest and moved to the south quarter.)

P: Spirits of the south, from wild fire come,
Fill these tools with the burning energies of the flames
Make them glow with bright fire
Spirits of fire, hearken unto me,
As I do will, so more it be.

(The tools are now taken up by the priestess and moved to the west quarter.)

P: Spirits of the west, from soothing water come,
Fill these tools with the calming energies of the warm rain
Make them flow like the tide
Spirits of water, hearken unto me,
As I do will, so more it be.

(The tools are now taken up by the priestess and moved to the altar.)

PS: Spirits of the north, from firm earth come,
Fill these tools with the ordering energies of the growing crops
Make them flourish like grapes on the vine
Spirits of earth, hearken unto me,
As I do will, so more it be.

(The priest takes the tools from the altar and steps backwards. The priestess stands at the altar facing south towards the priest. The priest extends his right arm in parallel to the ground, between he and the priestess, with the tools in his hand.)

P: I am the god, ever desiring.
I am the stag in the woods,
I am the sun in the noonday sky,
I am the lover in the dark.
I offer passion, strength, devotion and the swiftness of the hunt.

(The priestess extends her right arm in like fashion, and places her hand over that of the priest.)

PS: I am the goddess, ever nurturing.
I am the tempting beauty of the maid,
I am the quiet strength of the mother,
I am the infinite wisdom of the crone.
I offer life, love, warmth and the fruitfulness of the fields.

(Both step towards each other and turn their hands and arms so the fingers point upwards with the palms facing their own chest, cupping the other’s palm between and holding the tools. They clasp each other with their left arms.)

P&PS: Male and female, yin and yang, light and dark, action and stillness. Apart we are forever incomplete, but together we form one. In our joining we are blessed. In our union, the limitless energy of universe is released and captured here.
P: As I do will,
PS: As I do will
P&PS: As we do will, so mote it be.

(The priest and priestess kiss, then release grasps. If the number and size of the tools precludes them being held in one hand simultaneously, the latter charging section should be repeated for each. The tools are replaced on the altar. Cakes and wine are blessed and consumed and a period of relaxation and rest follows. The watchtowers are then dismissed and the circle opened.)

Witches Master Tool List

Witches Master Tool List

Equipment:

  • a pentacle
  • 6 candles; 1 for each direction, 2 for altar
  • chalice of wine (hard apple cider on Samhain)
  • wand
  • scrounge of silken cords
  • small bowl of water
  • small bowl of salt
  • 3 cords, one red, one white, one blue, 9′ long each
  • white-handled knife
  • individual athames
  • incense burner and incense
  • small hand bell
  • dish of cakes
  • sword
  • chalk
  • altar cloth of any color
  • cauldron
  • tape recorder and tapes of appropriate music
  • veil for Great Rite of a Goddess color: Blue, green, silver or white

For New or Dark Moon Esbat:

  • extra incense
  • an apple and a pomegranate
  • cauldron with a fire in it and/or a bonfire
  • crystal ball or other scrying tools
  • white tabard with hood for Priestess

For Winter Solstice (Yule):

  • cauldron with candle or oak bonfire
  • wreaths, 1 of holly and 1 of mistletoe
  • crowns, 1 of oak and 1 of holly
  • blindfold
  • sistrum
  • animal skull filled with salt

For Spring Equinox:

  • cords as described in preparations
  • hard-boiled eggs
  • a bonfire ready to ignite or a taper
  • flowers in the cauldron

For Beltane Sabbat:

  • bonfire

For Initiations:

  • anointing oil
  • tub to bathe the candidate in
  • towels
  • salts, herbs and oils to add to the bath
  • a blindfold
  • a shirt or other clothing that can be cut
  • a length of string to measure the person
  • two lengths of cord to bind the hands and feet
  • bonfire for warmth if needed

For Blessings:

  • anointing oil
  • wine

Charging & Caring for Your Magickal Tools

Charging Magickal Tools

It doesn’t matter whether you make your own tools or purchase them ready-made. What’s important is that you “charge” them before you use them for magickal work. Until you charge your chalice, it’s just a goblet. The practice of charging it imbues it with your own energy and consecrates it for magickal purposes.

A charging ritual may be very simple or very complex—it’s your choice. One easy and popular technique for charging your tools calls upon the four elements, again in symbolic form. First, wash the tool to cleanse it of any ambient vibrations. Next, hold your tool in front of you and visualize your energy flowing into it.

Sprinkle the tool with saltwater and say aloud: “I charge you with water and earth.” Then hold it for a few moments in the smoke of burning incense while saying “I charge you with fire and air.”

Some witches design rituals that involve the element to which the individual tool corresponds. You could charge your chalice by submerging it in a sacred pool of water for nine days. Similarly, you could bury a pentagram in the ground beneath a venerable tree or place your wand in the sunshine to let the sun’s rays charge it. If you wish, you can include music, crystals, or essential oils in the ritual. Be creative—engage your imagination and your emotions in the process.

Caring for Magickal Tools

Although some witches display their tools on their altars, most people recommend storing tools in a safe place, such as a trunk or chest, when you’re not using them. Wrap them in silk to protect them from dust, dirt, and ambient vibrations. If you drink wine or another beverage from your chalice during a ritual, of course you’ll want to wash it before putting it away. However, there’s no need to wash your other tools after using them—the more you handle them and do magick with them, the more you imprint them with your energy.

It’s usually not a good idea to allow anyone else to handle your magick tools. If you work regularly with a magickal partner, however, you might make an exception for that person.

It is important to remember do not use your magickal tools for mundane purposes. Use a regular kitchen knife, not your athame, for cutting food and herbs, drink everyday beverages from an ordinary glass, not your ritual chalice. Reserve these tools for spell working and ceremonial occasions.

 

–The Everything Wicca and Witchcraft Book: Rituals, spells, and sacred objects for everyday magick (Everything®)

Skye Alexander

The Witch’s Tool Kit

The Witch’s Tool Kit

All fields of knowledge and all trades employ special tools. The tools of the Craft speak to the subconscious mind in forms that help support magickal work. A tool’s shape, material, and other features provide clues to its symbolism and thus its role in magick. Although some of the items in a witch’s tool kit may look familiar, their magickal purposes differ significantly from their roles in the mundane world. Some of the tools witches favor are used by magicians of other stripes as well.

The Role of Tools in Magick

Witches and Wiccans will tell you that tools are good helpmates to magick, but they are not necessary to the success of any spell or ritual. Even the most elegant tool is only a centering device, something to focus your mind on your magickal work. Without the witch’s will and directed energy, the potential in any tool will remain dormant. For example, a witch might talk about quartz crystals as having energy-enhancing power, but until a crystal is charged and activated, that ability “sleeps” within the stone. The magician is the enabler, the catalyst. A focused will is all that any effective witch needs to perform magick. Everything else just makes the job easier.

Symbolism and Significances

As you’ve already seen, witches often use symbols to embody ideas. The primary tools witches employ in rituals—the wand, chalice, athame, and pentagram—symbolize the four elements. The wand represents the element of fire, the chalice signifies the water element, the athame symbolizes air, and the pentagram represents earth.

Notice that the shapes of these tools correspond to the human body. The wand and the athame, which symbolize masculine power, look distinctly phallic. The chalice (and cauldron) depict feminine energy and the womb. The five points of the pentagram stand for the five “points” of the body: head, arms, and legs.

You can see the four main tools illustrated in the tarot, too. Each suit in the deck is named for one of these tools: wands (sometimes called rods or staves), swords (or daggers, meaning athames), cups (or chalices), and pentacles (or pentagrams, sometimes called coins or disks). As such, they describe fundamental life energies and ways of interacting with the world.

The Everything Wicca and Witchcraft Book: Rituals, spells, and sacred objects for everyday magick (Everything®)

Skye Alexander

Besom/Besom Blessing

BESOM

(BROOM)

 

Hardly anything symbolizes Witchcraft more than the besom (pronounced BEH-sum). The idea of Witches flying on brooms is as old as the Craft itself. We may never find out just where or when this phenomenon began, but it lends certain magick to the tales of old.

The significance of the besom (broom) rests with its ability to sweep, and therefore clean an area of unwanted dirt. European folklore is full of stories about using brooms along with certain incantations while sweeping out the house, the purpose being to sweep out the evil influences along with the dirt. The broom has also been used to form common law marriages. Both parties jump over the broomstick to signify they are joined in a union. Today, many Wiccans and Pagans still jump over the broom at the end of the marriage ceremonies to seal their union.

An authentic besom or Witches broom has seven distinct parts.

1. The Staff Butt: Usually solid, but may also be hollow and plugged with a wood cork.

2. The Staff: The long shaft of the broom, sometimes referred to as the wand, will vary in length, thickness, and texture. Its carvings and decorations also vary.

3. The Choke Ring: This binds the upper part of bristles to the staff and is usually made of metal, silver being the best as it represents the moon and goddess. Sometimes there may be several of these used. When more than one is used the first is silver, the second is gold, and the third is copper.

4. The Stalks (bristles): These are grouped evenly around the opposite end of the staff. The stalks should be about half the finished length of the broom.

5. The Stalk Tips: The thick ends are held by the choke ring, with the thin ends extending. All of the stalks should be bending in the same direction.

6. The Splay Ring: There is only one of these and it keeps the stalks evenly placed about the stalk. This ring is usually made of a very strong pliable cording, as it takes up the strain and pressure of the use that is exerted when sweeping.

7. The Stalk Butts: These are the thick ends of the bristles and are bound by the choke ring.

 

Besom Blessing

Items needed:

a small bowl of salt and one of water

a white candle

a small bunch of fresh rosemary

a censer

a small block of church charcoal

your besom.

Perform this simple ceremony to bless and consecrate your broom. This will remove all of the negative thoughts and vibrations that may be attached to the broom making it ready for magickal works.

Place the candle, the bowl of salt, and the one of water, along with the censer and rosemary on a small table. Light the charcoal, and the white candle. Sprinkle some salt over the broom and then some water as you say:

Water and Earth Wash thee clean,

Of all that was And is unclean.

Place some of the rosemary on the hot coal in the censer. Pick up the broom and pass it through the smoke of the burning herb, and then through the candle flame as you say:

Essence of Air Flame of Fire,

Cleanse thee of all But what I desire.

The broom is now ready to use for both mundane and magickal works. Use your broom to purge your house of negative thoughts and vibrations as well as unwanted guests.

Athame/Consecration of the Athame

Athame

The athame is a double-edged knife used to inscribe, or cast, the circle of power onto the earth or floor. It is associated with the element of fire, and it represents strength, power, and the masculine force of nature. Since the athame is a weapon, it also has the power to subdue and banish rebellious entities or spirits.

In magick, the athame is used for directing personal power and to focus energy in a desired direction. The athame also regulates, as well as conducts, the flow of internal expression toward the desired destination during magickal operations.

 

CONSECRATION OF THE ATHAME

 

Items needed:

Athame

small bowl of water with three pinches of salt added

one white candle

one black candle

sandalwood incense.

On the night of the full moon, place the above items on your altar or small table. Light both of the candles and the incense. Relax and focus on the athame. Pass the athame blade and handle through the flame of the black candle as you say:

All negative thoughts be banished,

all unwanted vibrations be gone.

Now pass the athame blade and handle through the flame of the white candle as you say:

Let only the forces and powers

I wish be within from this moment on.

Pass the athame through the smoke of the incense, through the white candle flame, and then sprinkle with salt water as you say:

Elements of Air, Fire, Water, and Earth.

To this tool of the magick now give birth.

Blessed and consecrated in this hour

Be thou athame of strength and power.

Wrap the athame in a red silk cloth, and keep in a safe place. Only use the athame for magickal rites and spellcrafting.

BROOMSTICK

Possessed by you

BROOMSTICK

Brooms aren’t just for sweeping-at least not in the way that most people think.

Witches use brooms to clear away negativity from a room (spring cleaning, anyone?) or a ritual circle.

Brooms are also a symbol of Witches and Witchcraft that have been in use for centuries. They represent the freedom of flying (alas, only in our minds and spirits for most of us, unless we’re Harry Potter) and the comfort of hearth and home.

A Witch’s broom should never be used for everyday cleaning, but feel free to keep another broom for that-they are a handy household tool. As with your other tools, a ritual broom should be carefully tended and only used for magickal purposes.

One way to keep a special broom if you’re still “in the broom closet” is to craft one out of broom straw, aromatic herbs, and colorful foliage (topped off with a spritz of glycerin to make it last), and hang it on your wall in full sight. After all, no one but you needs to know it is anything other than a clever, crafty decoration. (If you’re craft-impaired, you can also just buy a pre-decorated rated broom and hang it up. I’ll never tell.)

 

Everyday Witch A to Z: An Amusing, Inspiring & Informative Guide to the Wonderful World of Witchcraft
Deborah Blake

 

Let’s Talk Witch – Salt’s Usages & Superstitions

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Let’s Talk Witch – Salt’s Usages & Superstitions

Since time immemorial, amazing properties and superstitions have been attributed to salt. Salt is a crystalline substance that is produced as if by magic in water… and disappears in water. Salt is a pure product – that is, it does not contain any additional substances – that is white in color, and for this reason is considered to be “sacred.” We must remember that in days of yore, salt was extremely valuable, expensive, and indispensable to human life. Salt was so expensive that in many countries, gathering and mining salt was the monopoly of the king or ruler. Salt has good and bad properties.

The first superstition states that salt protects the person against the devil. This is why, when salt is spilled, it is a sign that the devil is in the vicinity, and the person’s guardian angel caused him to spill the salt. Since the guardian angel is stationed behind the person’s right shoulder, and the devil is behind his left shoulder, he must immediately take a pinch of the salt and throw it over his left shoulder in order to blind the devil! However, spilled salt also foretells an imminent quarrel between the members of a couple, perhaps as a result of the fact that in the past, salt was very expensive. “A quarrel with a husband always starts with spilled salt!”

Spilled salt is not only the sign of a quarrel, but also foretells days of sadness. In North America, it is believed that salt predicts sadness… since many tears are needed to “rinse out” the salt. For this reason, it is customary to pour salt onto fire, or onto a range – in order to “dry up” the tears of sadness. Obviously, the fact that tears are salty is connected to this superstition.

When salt is sprinkled on the threshold of the home, the devil and his henchmen cannot get in. (In fact, when salt or ash is sprinkled on the floor, the devil won’t come because he is afraid of leaving tracks.)

In order to greet an important or beloved guest, he is received with a gift in the form of bread and salt, or by placing a pinch of salt in his right hand.

If a pinch of salt is placed on a baby’s tongue, he will have a long, happy, and healthy life.

Incidentally, salt was used as currency in the past, both in trade, and especially as soldiers’ salaries. In fact, the word “salary” comes from “sal”, the Latin word for “salt.” This in fact means that “he is worth his salt.” There is a belief that salt provides immunity against poisons. This belief stems from the custom of former rulers, who would take a pinch of poison with their food in order to fortify their immunity against genuine poisoning. They mixed the poison with salt. This is the origin of the expression, “A pinch of salt a day prevents a change of ruler.”

The expression, “salt of the earth,” describes the cream of humanity. A Muslim proverb states that “salt was spilled between us,” meaning that a covenant was sworn between people. In the East, salt is still a purifying and sanctifying substance. Salt is sprinkled in the Sumo wrestling ring before every match in order to purify it of the evil eye.

 

Day-by-Day Wicca: A complete guide to Wicca from Beliefs and Rituals to Magic and Witchcraft
Tabatha Jennings

In the Witch’s Tool Chest: “Cauldron and Chalice – My Cup Runneth Over”

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“Cauldron and Chalice – My Cup Runneth Over”

 

Many of the tools that Witches use are said to represent either the masculine (the god) or the feminine (the goddess). Two of the most common “female” tools are the cauldron and the chalice. Because of their cupped shape, they symbolize the womb of the goddess.

Who isn’t familiar with the image of the Witch stirring up some magickal potion in her cauldron? (Okay, I think most of the time it was probably just her dinner, but who are we to argue with centuries of fairy tales?) These days, Witches are more likely to use the cauldron-usually an iron pot with three legs-to hold a fire during ritual or just for decoration. The Celtic goddess Cerridwen was famous for her cauldron, in which she brewed the mead of wisdom and inspiration. (Don’t you wish you had that recipe?)

The chalice is used to hold the wine or water for use during ritual, and it represents the feminine forces of intuition, understanding, and receptivity. They are often made of silver, glass, pewter, or pottery. I think it is important to choose a chalice that you truly love the look and feel of, and set it aside for use during rituals only. Somehow using that Batman juice glass doesn’t seem to cut it.

 

Everyday Witch A to Z: An Amusing, Inspiring & Informative Guide to the Wonderful  World of Witchcraft

Deborah Blake