Monday Tidbits

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Monday Tidbits

Monday is ruled by the moon. Magical work planned for a Monday should involve aspects of the Goddess and any rites to honor her. In Wicca, the phases of the moon are revered as natural symbols of the different phases of womanhood. Spells and rituals invoking change are appropriate for a Monday.

The moon rules the tides, so spells involving water are also appropriate for this time. Think of purification and cleansing work that you may need to do. Even consecrating your chalice would be an appropriate work for a Monday. Meditate on the aspects of the Greek maiden huntress, Artemis, twin sister of Apollo, or on her Roman counterpart, Diana of the silver bow. The lunar energy will bless your work if you acknowledge it correctly.

—Judy Ann Olsen, A Witch’s Grimoire: Create Your Own Book of Shadows

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The Witches Magick for Feb. 21 – Salt and Water Clearing Spell

Salt and Water Clearing Spell

Cast this spell to rid yourself of pain, hurt and sadness.

After dark, draw a magick circle and call in the elements. Put three pinches of sea salt in a chalice of water. Stir the water counterclockwise with your athame. Sit quietly and turn you mind toward what you want to get rid of your worries, problems, disappointments, sadness, hurt feelings, and fears. Hold the cup in between your hands, and say three times:

Clear the pain. Clear the hurt. Clear the sadness.

Sip three sips of the water. Before each sip, repeat:

I rid myself of all negativity, right now.

Allow all of your negative feelings to be cleansed with the salt water. Imagine transforming any pain or sadness into positive change elements in your life. Feel yourself being cleansed of all that burdens you. When you are done, bid farewell to the elements and pull up the circle.

Empty the remaining water down the drain, and clean your chalice thoroughly with clear, cool water.

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Calendar of the Moon for December 12th

Calendar of the Moon

12 Ruis/Poseideion

Day of the Underworld III

Color: Grey
Element: Water
Altar: The altar is the same as the day before, with the chalice replenished, and a pile of coins.
Offering: Whatever the Gods tell you.
Daily Meal: Fasting tonight, until the next morning.

Underworld Invocation III

(The speaker holds up the chalice yet again, and says:)
Elixirs fade and potions fail,
The gold is rusted from the grail,
The wine is changed to water thin,
The blood is wasted from the skin,
And all that from this glass is drunk
May leave us only smaller shrunk.
(The chalice is passed, and each takes a sip.)
Now that we have passed through Earth,
We must pass over the River of the Dead.
Black water laps at our feet,
Faces stare up at us, seeing and unseeing,
From the depths of the River.
Are you ready to pass over the water?
Do you have ready the fare you will pay?
(Each takes two coins from the altar, and states what they will do to pay their fare. The speaker then takes the dried thistles and crushes them into a box, saying:)
Even the King is old and white
When royal noon is turned to night.
Yet better the peace of thistledown
Than power under a thorny crown.
Let him sleep his sleep of grey
Where gold and purple fall away,
And let us lie beside him here,
Past pain or joy, desire or fear.

(All come forward and lie down on the floor, in front of the altar, in a position of death, with the coins laid on their eyes. One who has been chosen to do the work of the ritual comes by with the chalice, and gently bathes the face of every corpse, and collects the coins. After a time, all rise in silence and go.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

The Witches Magick for Dec. 11th – Clurichaun Blessing

Clurichaun Blessing

The residents of a house would leave offerings for the Clurichaun, who sing in Gaelic with enchantingly beautiful voices. Related to leprechauns, Clurichaun are house faeries that specialize in caring for and protecting wine and beer cellars. Clurichauns also guard a hidden treasure. In this spell, you are asking the Clurichaun to bless and protect your home.

You need a chalice full of wine (or juice) and your magick wand.

Begin by drawing a magick circle and calling in the elements. With your want in your right hand and the chalice of wine in your left hand, stand in front of the north point of the circle while saying:

Clurichauns and all good house faeries
Protect this home with your energies.
 

Go around to the east, south, and west points in that order, doing the same thing. Once this is completed, return to your altar and place the chalice of wine on it while saying:

I offer my thanks with this wine
To the Clurichauns this is my sign.
Bless the faeries, always, blessed be!
 

Thank the Clurichauns, bid farewell to the elements, and pull up the circle. Leave the chalice of wine on your altar overnight, and in the morning pour it into the earth as an offering to the faeries.

Ritual Tools That Won’t Break the Bank

Ritual Tools That Won’t Break the Bank

Author:   Bronwen Forbes   

We’ve all seen them, either on EBay or some online Wicca supply shop – or even the Pagan bookstore in our own town: ritual tools and altar pieces that are apparently only for the independently wealthy. Well, seeing as how I am still a full-time student, i.e. broke, I’ve been searching for alternative sources for ritual tools and other altar accoutrements priced reasonably enough to guarantee I could afford to eat meat for the rest of the month. I’d like to share them with you.

My first stop was, believe it or not, my local Wal-Mart. And if the items mentioned below can be found in my Wally World out in the middle of southwestern USA nowhere, I’ll bet they’re at your Wal-Mart, too.

Wands

I remember a few years ago that tree branches given a “spiral” look by having a grapevine grow around them were quite the popular item at various Pagan gatherings. Unfortunately, these polished, um, sticks were priced at seventy dollars each, if not more! Ouch!

Even here on the edge of the great Southwestern desert, we have trees. Which means your chances of having access to free wand material are even better than mine. Find a tree you like, either because it’s your favorite kind (oak, maple, etc.) or because it’s located near your home and you think it’s friendly, or whatever. Note: if the tree is not on your property, get permission before you cut a branch or two. Also note: get permission from the tree before you start chopping. Tradition holds that a wand should be the length of the owner’s arm from the tip of the middle finger to the elbow. Let the wood “cure” for a season or two; carefully remove the bark, and presto! Free wand!

Athame

If you’re not totally into the traditional athame, which is a double-edged blade with a black handle, Wal-Mart is your new best friend. If you’re drawn to kitchen witchery (herbalism, cooking, food spells, etc.) , the housewares aisle has a plethora of really nice kitchen knives (and I mean pretty darn nice) starting at around three dollars each. Or you can check out the hunting and camping department. They had some wicked (and I mean that in a good way, of course) hunting knives, averaging around fourteen dollars apiece.

Either way, these are much cooler, cheaper and more practical (!) than the easily bendable mermaid-shaped athame with Austrian crystal eyes for twenty bucks on EBay.

Chalice

If you’re very lucky, once or twice a year there will be some sort of arts fair in your town. These fairs attract a lot of potters. Potters like to make chalices, and will sell the ones where the glaze “didn’t come out quite right” for five to ten dollars. And then you have a handmade, one-of-a-kind chalice!

If you’re mostly lucky, there is a paint-your-own-pottery shop nearby. For about five dollars per painting session and three to ten dollars for the cup, again, you have a one-of-a-kind chalice that you glazed yourself. How cool is that?

However, there is always our friend Wal-Mart, which sells something call tea goblets. Tea goblets are basically short, fat wine glasses with very little stem and lots of cup space. Last Friday I noticed a choice of green or brown tea goblets for $2.22 apiece, or a box of four clear ones for about nine dollars. They looked pretty nice!

Pentacle

Assuming you don’t want to pay at least $40 for a brass or copper disc with a pentacle etched on it (and since you’re reading this, I’m guessing that’s a pretty fair assumption) , again, you’ll find everything you need to make a nice wooden one at Wal-Mart. A wooden disk six inches in diameter costs $.97 and can be found in the craft aisle. A protractor (assuming you don’t have one left over from geometry) costs about a dollar. Craft paint is also pretty cheap!

Or, you can forego the wooden disk, find a nice free round-ish, flat-ish rock somewhere, and paint a pentacle on that.

Even if you have absolutely no artistic talent whatsoever (like me) , it’s not that hard to draw a perfectly symmetrical 5-pointed star (that’s what the protractor is for) , and then paint over it.

Miscellaneous

Wal-Mart sells soapstone stick incense burners for just under $2. They’re not fancy, but they’re nice. If I didn’t have a plethora of wooden ones all over the house, I’d probably get one (I think the wooden ones breed when I’m not looking!) . They also sell reasonably nice cut glass candlesticks for about $3 each. In the potpourri section (usually near the fabric/craft section) they have potpourri-replenishing oils. I wouldn’t use the oils straight, I’d mix them with a small bit of unscented baby oil, but they smelled pretty good.

If you just can’t bring yourself to shop for ritual and altar items at Wal-Mart, don’t panic! Check out garage sales, flea markets, junky little antique stores, and estate sales. With a little time, effort, and patience, you’re very likely to find exactly what you want for next to nothing – like my prized pentacle-shaped cast iron pot trivet that set me back a whole three bucks at a junky antique store.

A ritual tool is not made more powerful by a high price tag or fancy decoration, but by use, by respect, and by intent. Let me give you an example: when I found myself unexpectedly living alone a few years ago, I went to the local flea market to pick up some kitchen items. I was broke, but I needed pots to cook in!

One of my finds was an old white enamel pasta pot for next to nothing. It came with a few dings in the enamel, but I have proudly served my coven many a soup, stew, or lasagna whose noodles were cooked in that pot. That pot is practically part of the coven, now. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

Calendar of the Sun for November 13th

Calendar of the Sun

13 Blutmonath

Fontinalia

Colors: Blue and clear
Element: Water
Altar: Set with a blue cloth, a large earthenware bowl of spring water in which has been placed several stones, an earthenware chalice, a dipper, and possibly a small fountain.
Offerings: Coins, to be tossed into the fountain or bowl afterwards. These should then be added to a charity fund.
Daily Meal: Nothing to drink but spring water all day. River fish. Watercress. Lotus root.

Invocation to Fons:

Hail, Spirit of the Fountain,
Spirit of wells and springs,
Gift of the Earth!
So much of our world is water,
So much of our bodies are water,
So much of the air we breathe
Is laden with water,
And yet so little of it
Will quench our thirst.
Let us never forget the generosity
Of the Earth beneath us
Who gives forth blood
In a form that we can drink of.
Hail, Spirit of the Fountain!
You who are the pure water
Blossoming forth from the Earth,
Let us remember how purity
Can come forth from that
Which is made of cold stone
And that which rotted into the mould.
With every taste of water,
We will remember your gift.

Chant:
Born of water, cleansing, powerful, flowing, healing, we are….

(Let one who is chosen to do the work of this ritual ladle out the spring water into the chalice, and pass it about to all present, and then pour the rest back into the bowl. After the meditation is over, the water should be returned to the Earth as a libation, and the stones set aside until the next year. One stone should be added each year thenceforth.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

The Cauldron Chant

Tools Of The Craft

The Cauldron Chant

by Ammond ShadowCraft

 

We form the Circle,
The Circle most round.
We form the Chalice,
The Chalice now found.

 

We call the Goddess,
to meet the great need.
We call the God,
To plant His fertile seed.

 

We call the quarters,
which we call four.
We summon the powers,
that contain the force.

 

We stir the Cauldron,
from which we were born.
We call the Gods,
from whom we were torn.

 

We say the words,
which lead us round.
We pass the kiss,
with our lovers found.

 

We face our dreams,
in nights psychic flight.
We face our hopes,
in bright moon of the night.

 

We face our fears,
on the Dark Lords Horn.
We face our failure,
in the Mothers new planted corn.

 

We live our lives,
drumming and dancing on the meadow.
We confront our Death,
in the dancing moon light shadow.

 

Our paths run quickly,
on fleet foot and wing.
Our Circle is joyous,
with our Queens and our Kings.

 

Let our little Circle be happy,
with Bell, Bowl or Bow.
And form now this Circle,
with gracious Love, Joy and Hope.

 

BLESSED BE

 

Ritual Tools That Won’t Break the Bank

Ritual Tools That Won’t Break the Bank

Author:   Bronwen Forbes   

We’ve all seen them, either on EBay or some online Wicca supply shop – or even the Pagan bookstore in our own town: ritual tools and altar pieces that are apparently only for the independently wealthy. Well, seeing as how I am still a full-time student, i.e. broke, I’ve been searching for alternative sources for ritual tools and other altar accoutrements priced reasonably enough to guarantee I could afford to eat meat for the rest of the month. I’d like to share them with you.

My first stop was, believe it or not, my local Wal-Mart. And if the items mentioned below can be found in my Wally World out in the middle of southwestern USA nowhere, I’ll bet they’re at your Wal-Mart, too.

Wands

I remember a few years ago that tree branches given a “spiral” look by having a grapevine grow around them were quite the popular item at various Pagan gatherings. Unfortunately, these polished, um, sticks were priced at seventy dollars each, if not more! Ouch!

Even here on the edge of the great Southwestern desert, we have trees. Which means your chances of having access to free wand material are even better than mine. Find a tree you like, either because it’s your favorite kind (oak, maple, etc.) or because it’s located near your home and you think it’s friendly, or whatever. Note: if the tree is not on your property, get permission before you cut a branch or two. Also note: get permission from the tree before you start chopping. Tradition holds that a wand should be the length of the owner’s arm from the tip of the middle finger to the elbow. Let the wood “cure” for a season or two; carefully remove the bark, and presto! Free wand!

Athame

If you’re not totally into the traditional athame, which is a double-edged blade with a black handle, Wal-Mart is your new best friend. If you’re drawn to kitchen witchery (herbalism, cooking, food spells, etc.) , the housewares aisle has a plethora of really nice kitchen knives (and I mean pretty darn nice) starting at around three dollars each. Or you can check out the hunting and camping department. They had some wicked (and I mean that in a good way, of course) hunting knives, averaging around fourteen dollars apiece.

Either way, these are much cooler, cheaper and more practical (!) than the easily bendable mermaid-shaped athame with Austrian crystal eyes for twenty bucks on EBay.

Chalice

If you’re very lucky, once or twice a year there will be some sort of arts fair in your town. These fairs attract a lot of potters. Potters like to make chalices, and will sell the ones where the glaze “didn’t come out quite right” for five to ten dollars. And then you have a handmade, one-of-a-kind chalice!

If you’re mostly lucky, there is a paint-your-own-pottery shop nearby. For about five dollars per painting session and three to ten dollars for the cup, again, you have a one-of-a-kind chalice that you glazed yourself. How cool is that?

However, there is always our friend Wal-Mart, which sells something call tea goblets. Tea goblets are basically short, fat wine glasses with very little stem and lots of cup space. Last Friday I noticed a choice of green or brown tea goblets for $2.22 apiece, or a box of four clear ones for about nine dollars. They looked pretty nice!

Pentacle

Assuming you don’t want to pay at least $40 for a brass or copper disc with a pentacle etched on it (and since you’re reading this, I’m guessing that’s a pretty fair assumption) , again, you’ll find everything you need to make a nice wooden one at Wal-Mart. A wooden disk six inches in diameter costs $.97 and can be found in the craft aisle. A protractor (assuming you don’t have one left over from geometry) costs about a dollar. Craft paint is also pretty cheap!

Or, you can forego the wooden disk, find a nice free round-ish, flat-ish rock somewhere, and paint a pentacle on that.

Even if you have absolutely no artistic talent whatsoever (like me) , it’s not that hard to draw a perfectly symmetrical 5-pointed star (that’s what the protractor is for) , and then paint over it.

Miscellaneous

Wal-Mart sells soapstone stick incense burners for just under $2. They’re not fancy, but they’re nice. If I didn’t have a plethora of wooden ones all over the house, I’d probably get one (I think the wooden ones breed when I’m not looking!) . They also sell reasonably nice cut glass candlesticks for about $3 each. In the potpourri section (usually near the fabric/craft section) they have potpourri-replenishing oils. I wouldn’t use the oils straight, I’d mix them with a small bit of unscented baby oil, but they smelled pretty good.

If you just can’t bring yourself to shop for ritual and altar items at Wal-Mart, don’t panic! Check out garage sales, flea markets, junky little antique stores, and estate sales. With a little time, effort, and patience, you’re very likely to find exactly what you want for next to nothing – like my prized pentacle-shaped cast iron pot trivet that set me back a whole three bucks at a junky antique store.

A ritual tool is not made more powerful by a high price tag or fancy decoration, but by use, by respect, and by intent. Let me give you an example: when I found myself unexpectedly living alone a few years ago, I went to the local flea market to pick up some kitchen items. I was broke, but I needed pots to cook in!

One of my finds was an old white enamel pasta pot for next to nothing. It came with a few dings in the enamel, but I have proudly served my coven many a soup, stew, or lasagna whose noodles were cooked in that pot. That pot is practically part of the coven, now. I wouldn’t trade it for anything.

Consecration of Chalice, Athame or Other Tool

Consecration of Chalice, Athame or Other Tool

Before these assembled spirits I bring (name type of tool) to be dedicated to the service of  the Lady and Lord.

(Pass tool three times through smoke of the incense.)

By the power of air, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to purity of thought and to  harmlessness that all intentions for which thou art used may harm none and be for the good of  all.

(Pass tool three times through or over the flame of the fire candle.)

By the power of fire, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to purity of desire and to harmlessness that all goals which thou doest help achieve may harm none and be for the good of all.

(Take a few drops of water and sprinkle or dab on instrument.)

By the power of water, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to purity of emotion and to  harmlessness that all that thou shalt be used in a spirit of harmony, harming none and for the  good of all.

(Touch instrument to the stone or salt in north quarter)

By the power of earth, be thou purified. Be thou dedicated to steadfastness and purity of  purpose, that my will be achieved without wavering, with harm to none and for the good of all.

(If this is a chalice, present it first to the Lady, then to the Lord, if athame, reverse  order. All other instruments use personal preference, but it is courtesy to present them to Her  first.)

PRESENTATION FOR CHALICE:

Lady Freya, Keeper of Femininity, bless this chalice. Let it be as Thy cauldron, a vessel of  productivity that it may be worthy to dispense Thy bounty. Let it be used in Thy service and in  the service of humanity. Let it be so bound that no harm may come of it to any being, but let it  rather be an instrument of goodwill and understanding; of loving harmony. To Thy sacred self I  dedicate this vessel, (name of vessel), that it and I may long be of service to Thee.

Lord Thor, companion to the Lady, champion of the Gods, bless this chalice and keep watch  over it. Guard the works which come forth from it, that they ever be in the service of Thee and  Thy Lady, that they be of service to humankind, and that they abide by the laws of harmony. To  Thee I vow I shall use it for Her sacred purposes, and for no other.

So mote it be.

PRESENTATION FOR ATHAME:

Lord Thor, thunderer & hammer wielder, bless this athame. Let it be as the spring rains  which fall upon the Earth to cause Her to bring forth Her bounty.

Let it quicken my hopes and dreams, yet keep them from causing harm. Let it guide them in the  harmony of the seasons, bringing forth only good for all. Lord Thor, bless this athame, (name of  athame), that it be used ever in the worship and honor of the Gods.

Lady Freya, companion to the Thunderer, lover of the Gods, bless this athame that it shall  bring forth joy, and shall cause no pain nor disharmony to any. I dedicate this athame (name  athame), symbol of the Defender and Rain Maker, to Thy service. May it ever bring Thee joy and  pride.

So mote it be.

(This ritual, with suitable changes, may be used to dedicate other tools as well as these.)

The Five Stages of Spellcasting: Stage Five Moving to a Conclusion

The Five Stages of Spellcasting: Stage Five Moving to a Conclusion

 

Staging 5: Moving to a conclusion – grounding or internalizing the power

If you would like to incorporate cakes and ale into a spell or ritual, this would be the point at which you would first take the cakes on the dish. When you are working alone, this is a lovely part of a spell or ritual to help to connect you with the love all round you.

Raise the cakes on their plate (one for you and one for the birds if working alone) skywards away from the altar.

Then lower them to waist height in front of you, saying:

“May the abundance of the Mother and the bountifulness of the Father bless and nourish, sustain and protect me/you/us all my/your/our days.”

 

You can, if more than one person is present, choose one to hold the dish and another to bless the cakes by making either a pentagram or a cross over the dish as the words are spoken. You can, of course, do this alone with your power hand.

Put the plate in the center of the altar.

Now take the chalice or goblet in your receptive hand and your wand in your power hand and gently lower the tip of the wand so it almost touches the surface of the wine or juice. Say:

“As male to female, god to goddess, so in this wine/juice is joined power and love, strength and compassion, striving and acceptance.”

 

Return it to the center of the altar.

If more than one person is present, one can bless the cakes and another can bless the wine. The same people are usually chosen to carry out the blessings, but you may prefer to share the duties. Often the wand is held by a female and the cup by a male for the crossing of energies, but two women or men can carry out the ceremony.

You should then take the cakes, scatter a few crumbs on the ground (or in a dish indoors) and say:

“I return the gift to the earth mother in thanks for blessings received. Blessings be.”

 

After the ceremony feed the rest of this cake to the birds.

At this point if there were two people involved, you can offer each other a cake and then pass them round to anyone else present. Each person can say:

“Blessed be.”

 

Or add a blessing before eating.

You should then return the plate to the altar and take the wine, pouring a little on the ground and thanking mother earth again for her blessings. (Pour this offering into a dish if indoors and you can put the crumbs and liquid outside after the ceremony.)

Now drink or offer the drink to the other person who blessed the chalice. He or she will take a sip and offer it to you and to the other person who carried out the blessings, saying:

“Blessings be.”

 

If others are present, pass the cup round so each can take a sip, saying:

“Blessings be.”

 

And perhaps adding a blessing before passing it on.