August, the Eighth Month of the Year of our Goddess, 2016

Large Oval Month August CU

“August rushes by like desert rainfall,
A flood of frenzied upheaval,
Expected,
But still catching me unprepared.
Like a match flame
Bursting on the scene,
Heat and haze of crimson sunsets.
Like a dream
Of moon and dark barely recalled,
A moment,
Shadows caught in a blink.
Like a quick kiss;
One wishes for more
But it suddenly turns to leave,
Dragging summer away.”

– Elizabeth Maua Taylor, August

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AUGUST – CORN MOON

August is the eighth month of the year and name for Augustus Caesar. Its astrological sign is Leo the lion (July 22 – August 23), a fixed fire sign ruled by the Sun. In August we are surrounded by the power and glory of the Goddess. The fields of August bring forth bounty. In nature, yellow and gold dominate with corn, sunflowers, black-eyed Susans, and goldenrod brightening the landscape. The month begins with Lammas, or Lughnasadh, the first of the harvest sabbats. Brains are honored now, and breads are always found on the Lammas table. Nowadays, attending a country fair is a pleasant way to observe the harvest season. Produce, canned foods, and baked goods are proudly displayed along with prize ribbons. In August you can occasionally feel the breath of autumn. There’s a coolness in the breeze, and a change in the angle of the sunlight, which reminds us summer is not endless. At twilight, the katydid begins scratching its late summer song. The ancient Romans held Diana’s feast on August 13. It was a time of feasting and enjoying the farmer’s bounty. Many Native Americans celebrate the corn harvest in August. This festival eventually gave August’s Full Moon its name, the Corn Moon. Magic for the Corn Moon may focus on health, fertility, or abundance.

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The Corn Moon

In late August, we celebrate the beginning of the Corn Moon. This moon phase is also known as the Barley Moon, and carries on the associations of grain and rebirth that we saw back at Lammastide. August was originally known as Sextilis by the ancient Romans, but was later renamed for Augustus (Octavian) Caesar.

Correspondences

Colors: Yellow, red, orange
Gemstones: Tigers eye, carnelian, garnet, red agate
Trees: Cedar and hazel
Gods: Vulcan, Mars, Nemesis, Hecate, Hathor, Thoth
Herbs: Rosemary, basil, rue, chamomile
Element: Fire

Harness some of the Corn Moon’s fiery energy for your ritual and spell work. This is a good time to focus on your spiritual and physical health. It’s the time to harvest what you can now to put aside for later use. What sacrifices can you make today that will benefit you further down the road?
Also Known As: Barley Moon

Using Corn in 7 Magical Ways

To use corn in magical workings, think of the symbolism of this hearty grain. Here are some ways you can use corn in ritual:

  • Use corn in rituals involving growth and transformation. After all, a single kernel brings you a tall stalk full of (you guessed it!) more kernels! You can also associate it with self-sustainability and fertility, both of people and of the land.
  • Ceres was the Roman goddess of grain, specifically corn, and of the harvest season. According to Roman legend, she was the one who taught mankind how to farm. She is associated with agricultural fertility and a bountiful harvest. Make her an offering, and she may well protect your crops from natural disasters such as flooding or blight.
  • Create herbal sachets out of the husks, to use around the house, bringing in magic associated with various herbs.
  • Make offerings to gods or goddesses of fertility. Depending on your tradition, different deities like different things, but in general, you can’t go wrong with offerings that are food, drink, or handmade items.
  • Sprinkle corn around your ritual area to delineate sacred space. This is a great way to create an eco-friendly circle that you don’t have to clean up later – don’t worry, the birds and other local wildlife will take care of it!
  • Make a corn doll to honor the deity of your tradition.
  • Create a corn husk chain, with each link representing a magical goal. As you get closer to the goal, remove a link, and either burn it, bury it, or return it into your garden.

—-Patti Wigington, Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

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The Pagan Book of Days for the Month of August

August is named after the first Roman emperor, Augustus Caesar (23 September, 63 B.C.E. – 29 August, 14 C.E.). The tutelary goddess of August is Demeter or Ceres. According to legend, Demeter left Olympus, abode of the gods, to dwell on Earth. Her beneficent qualities and virtues are most apparent during this month of harvest. The Anglo Saxon name for it is another descriptive one: Weodmonath, “vegetation month.” The Frankish name is Aranmanoth, “corn ears month.” To modern Asatru, it is simply the month of Harvest. The full moon this month in the American backwoods tradition is the Sturgeon or Corn Moon. The first day of the month is the cross-quarter day festival of Lammas, the eighth station of the year. Many Pagans call it Lughnassadh, which is the unreformed Irish spelling of the modern Irish name, Lunasa. The Irish name for the day itself is La Lunasa. The ancient Pagan Irish Lughnassadh Assembly describes the themes associated with this festival:

Heaven, Earth, Sun, Moon and Sea,
Fruits of Earth and Sea-stuff,
Mouths, ears, eyes, possessions,
Feet, hands, warriors’ tongues.

Lammas is the first harvest of the traditional year, that of grain. This month is sacred to the god of wisdom, Lugh, tutelary deity of London, and Lyones, who is the Celtic parallel of the Norse Odin. The Celtic holly month Tinne ends on 4 August, to be followed by Coll, the hazel month. This is the time of gathering fruitfulness, figuratively in the use of words and divination, giving us creative power and energy. Its sacred color is brown, and its ruling being is the Irish demigod, Fionn MacCumhaill (often anglicized as Finn McCool). The goddess-calendar month of Kerea runs until 8 August, to be followed by the month of Hesperis. In Egypt the fixed Alexandrian calender has its New Year’s Eve on 29 August. This calendar was standardized in the year 30 B.C.E., beginning on this day with the month of Thoth, but it has subsequently succumbed to first the Julian and then the Islamic calendar.
The birthstone of August is the sardonyx, whose adage goes:

Wear a Sardonyx or for thee
No conjugal felicity.
Those August born without this stone
‘Tis said must live unloved, alone.

Country weather lore for August links it as follows: “As August, so next February.” Also, “A fog in August means a severe winter and plenty of snow.” The immediate weather concerns the forthcoming harvest, so of course, “Dry August and warm, doth harvest no harm.” A “green sky” above the sunset pressages a rainy morning. In this month, moon lore is important too. If a ring or halo appears around the moon, it foretells coming rain. The moon features in another traditional August weather rhyme:

Pale moon doth rain, red moon doth blow.
White moon doth neither rain nor snow.
Of course, the likelihood of snow in August is almost nil.

–The Pagan Book of Days, A Guide to the Festivals, Traditions, and Sacred Days of the Year
Nigel Pennick

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 Correspondences for the Month of August

NATURE SPIRITS: dryads

HERBS: chamomile, St Johns wort, bay, angelica, fennel, rue, orange

COLORS: Gold and Yellow

FLOWERS: Sunflower, marigold

SCENTS: Frankincense, heliotrope

STONES: Cat’s eye, carnelian, jasper, fire agate

TREES: Hazel, alder, cedar

ANIMALS: lion, phoenix, sphinx and the dragon

BIRDS: crane, falcon, eagle

DEITIES: Ganesha, Thoth, Hathor, Diana, Hectate, Nemesis

POWER/ADVICE: Energies should be put into harvesting, gathering vitality and health, also friendships.

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Symbols for the Month of August

The Goddesses of August
Tekhi, Ishtar, Ceres, Lakshmi, Hesperus, Tonantzin

August’s Sign of the Zodiac
Leo (the Lion): August 1 – August 22
Virgo (the Virgin): August 23 – August 31

August’s Celtic Tree Astrology
Tinne – Holly (July 8 – August 4)
Coll – Hazel (August 5 – September 1)

August’s Runic Half Months
Thorn (July 29 – August 12)
As (August 13 – August 28)
Rad (August 29 – September 12)

August’s Birthstones
Sardonyx

August’s Birth Flowers
Gladiolus and the poppy

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Pagan Calendar for August 2016

  • 1: Lammas or Lughnasadh
  • 1: Imbolc (Southern Hemisphere)
  • 1: Birthday of medium Edward Kelley, 1555
  • 4: Celtic Tree Month of Holly ends
  • 5: Celtic Tree Month of Hazel begins
  • 13: Roman Festival of Pomona
  • 15: Birthday of Charles Leland, folklorist and author, 1824
  • 18: Full Moon — Corn Moon at 5:29 am
  • 20: Birthday of author Ann Moura in 1947
  • 23: Roman Festival of Vulcanalia
  • 31: Birthday of author Raymond Buckland
Calendar published on & owned by About.com
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Protecting Your Home In The Month Of August & The Rest of the Year

This ritual is a wonderfully simple and effective way to bless your home, but here are some other ways in which you can magically protect and bless the place where you live:

Blow bubbles. I know it sounds mad, but what an enjoyable way to bless your home and get the little ones involved too! Pour the bubble mixture into a pretty bowl and, holding your hand over it, ask for it to be blessed with happiness and goodness. Then go outside and blow those blessings all around your home. (Just make sure you do it before you wash your windows. Mr. Hedgewitch once got a bit cross at all the bubble splatters across his clean panes. Not much happiness there!)

Float balloons. This method of home blessing is great fun for the kids. Blow up balloons and float them up to touch the roof of the house to get your blessings up as far as you can. Be imaginative!

Sweep away negativity. Use a broom that is reserved for just this task. A bundle of twigs tied with some cleansing herbs makes a great energy-clearing broom. Go around the house in a clockwise motion, sweeping out every room. End at the front door and sweep the negativity out with the words: “Be gone!”

Create a protective boundary. Sprinkle the perimeter of your home with salt to enclose it in a protective circle. Ask that no negativity cross this boundary. You can also bury jasmine incense sticks at the four corners of your property for blessings and protection. Use herbs here too. Strong-smelling herbs are the best for dealing with negativity, so sage, pine, and mint are all great to use. Combine them with peace-giving herbs like lavender, hops, or chamomile to create a peaceful boundary.

Bless the threshold. Focus some time on the entrance to your home. Your front door carries everything from outside over the threshold, so bless and protect it well. A pot of basil grown at the front door is a great way to do this. And wipe the door handle with lavender oil to touch everyone symbolically who enters with peace.

Inscribe your blessing. Take a small dish of oil— any will do, but I like to use olive oil— and place your hand over it, asking that it be filled with the power of blessings. Then visit every window and door in your home and, with your finger dipped in the oil, inscribe a protective symbol on each. You can use a flame, a pentacle, a sun, a flower, or anything that represents blessings to you. This also works well when performed with herbal tea. Try chamomile for peace, lemon for cleansing, etc.

Beat the boundary. This comes from an old British custom in which communities came together and beat the ground around the boundaries of the village with willow sticks that they called wands— and we know all about them, don’t we! This was done to ensure that the village was blessed, and to drive out any negativity for the coming year. So grab a willow stick if you can— your broom will work just as well— and beat the ground around your home, saying:

Blessings in and evil out,
Protection gained, there is no doubt!

Leave offerings. The spirits of your home and hearth need to be remembered too. Leave offerings of honey, cream, or cake to the Fae of your home and garden, thanking them for their presence in your household and asking them to bestow blessings upon it. Remember, they won’t consume what you leave, but they will feast on the essence. So keep your offerings fresh and light a candle occasionally to honor them.

Hang blessings. Make some little sachets with herbs and flowers to hang in your home. Basil is a wonderful herb to use for love and protection, but tailor your mix to what you want it to do. Keep your home in your mind as your create each sachet. Tie them with ribbons whose colors are associated with your spell and say the words: “So mote it be!” as you hang each one. You can also hang crystals in the windows to bounce their rainbow light around each room.

—Hedgewitch Book of Days: Spells, Rituals, and Recipes for the Magical Year
Mandy Mitchell

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We are Witches
We walk the path of the Old Gods
From this moment forth
We will not walk alone
Together, we will worship
Together, we will practice our Craft
Together, we will learn and grow
We vow to work, from this day forward
In perfect love and perfect trust
According to the free will of all
And for the good of all
Creating only beauty
Singing in harmony
Our song upon the Earth
Love is the law and love is the bond
In the name of the Goddess and the God
So do we vow, and so mote it be.
–Circle, Coven, & Grove: A Year of Magickal Practice
Deborah Blake
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“THINK on THESE THINGS” for August 26th

“THINK on THESE THINGS”
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

We want much. It seems sometimes that wanting is all we ever get done. And yet if it were not for the desires of our hearts, there would be little incentive to work and plan and expect.

Some would have us believe it is wrong to desire more than absolute necessities. But good desires channeled in the right direction can do nothing but better the one who seeks.

Sometimes getting is only a substitute for the true desire. Humans have a way of looking outside themselves for things to satisfy their spiritual hunger. It may be prestige. Or it may be anything that will inflate their egos and give them feelings of security.

Emerson wrote, “The implanting of a desire indicates that its gratification is in the constitution of the creature that feels it.” We have the ability to rise far above what we think we can. We have within us the answers if we but have the wisdom to seek those answers.

And perhaps we should consider, even before we begin to seek, the wisest of all instructions, “With all your getting get understanding.”

_______________________________

Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

Elder’s Meditation of the Day
By White Bison, Inc., an American Indian-owned nonprofit organization. Order their many products from their web site: http://www.whitebison.org

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – August 26

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – August 26

“Those who live for one another learn that love is the bond of perfect unity.”

–Fools Crow, LAKOTA

To serve each other, to respect each other, to trust each other, to honor each other, to love each other, to cooperate with each other, to care for each other, to forgive one another, to focus on peoples’ good, to laugh with one another, to learn from one another; to pray for each other – these are all acts of love. These values and actions will connect us to one another in the Unseen World. Nature is a good example of how we should get along with one another. Watch nature. She is our teacher. Nature lives to give to one another. The insects give to the birds who give to the four legged who give to the two legged. The Creator made all things perfect.

Oh Great Spirit, let me serve the people today. Let me see that it is better to give than it is to receive. Be with me today.

August 26 – Daily Feast

August 26 – Daily Feast

He sat easily on the ground and leaned his back against the rough bark of an oak and spoke solemnly of a problem relatively new to Cherokees. “Time was when ka in gv na w that doctors call depression was not in our camp. We had our lands and families, but it has changed. Old ones cry to leave land and trees, children wave little hands. Hardship not new, reason new. A scar is depression in skin. A hurt is depression in soul. Medicine cure cuts, but only Spirit sure hurt. Speak to it in your prayer and tell it go. Refuse it a place and always say thank you. Sing some, too. Deep in soul, sing, and it iron out depression.”

~ I am afraid that the white men are not speaking straight…. ~

CHIEF WENINOCK – YAKIMA, CIRCA 1915

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days, Volume II’ by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

The Daily Motivator for August 26th – Drama of the moment

The Daily Motivator message for
Friday, August 26, 2016

Drama of the moment

by Ralph Marston

Your anger is justified. But that doesn’t make it any less harmful.

Your frustration is understandable. Even so, it is not your best choice.

Plenty of valid reasons exist for you to be resentful, annoyed, envious, disappointed. Yet you’re better off letting it go and moving on.

Renew your commitment to live by intention, rather than by reaction. Choose to base your thoughts, feelings, actions, priorities on your highest purpose.

Look up, look forward, fill your awareness with what you deeply care about. Feel the power of love as it pushes you in a positive direction.

Envision the good you wish to create. Rise above the drama of the moment, and put your energy into what matters most.

© 2016 Ralph S. Marston, Jr.
From The Daily Motivator website at http://greatday.com/motivate/160826.html

Daily OM for August 26th – Life Packaging

Life Packaging
The Gift Inside

by Madisyn Taylor

We are all spiritual beings living in a human body; even though our packaging seems different, we are very much the same.

We have all had the experience of encountering someone whose life seems so completely different from ours that we can almost imagine we have nothing in common. However, if we go deeper into observing, we will see that we all have the same things going on in our lives. It is as if our different lives are in essence the same gift, wrapped in an infinite variety of containers, wrapping paper, ribbons, and bows. Everybody experiences loss, grief, happiness, excitement, anger, and fear. Everyone can have money issues of one kind or another, and everyone struggles with difficult choices.

Our lives show up differently for each one of us because we each learn in different ways. One person may need to learn the value of money by having too little of it, while another may need to learn by having more than enough. We each learn about work and love, with experiences that are tailored to our particular perspective. Even as it appears that some people have it easy while others are in a continual state of struggle, the truth is that we are all learning, and it is very difficult to tell, when looking only at the exterior of a person, what’s going on inside.

This is one of the many things that can be so valuable about cultivating relationships with people from all walks of life. As we get to know those who seem so different from us, we get to really see how much of life’s challenges and joys are universal. We begin to look beyond the packaging of skin color, clothing preferences, and socioeconomic differences, hairstyles, and the cars we drive to the heart of the human experience. It is important to honor and value the differences in our packaging, but it is just as important to honor the gift of life inside each one of us, and the fact that, no matter how different the packaging, the gift inside is the same.

 

 

Source

 

The Daily OM

I’m a Witch, Not a Wiccan: A Brief Summary of Broad Pagan Designations

I’m a Witch, Not a Wiccan: A Brief Summary of Broad Pagan Designations

Author: Treasach

I have commented before on the usefulness of designations in the neopagan community. Though we are generally self-directed with many being solitary and “eclectic”, it is darn helpful to be able to declare certain predispositions, especially if one is interested in working with others. In joining an on-line group or planning a ritual, the use of categories can help determine if a great deal of negotiation, or only a little, is required to make your collaborations most satisfying.

One question often asked is the difference between designations in the neopagan community. Of course, there are a vast variety of answers, and as a very dynamic and vibrant community, these answers may be quite altered in a decade. However, there are some trends that seem to have settled out for the moment…

Earth Religions or Earth-Centred Spirituality is currently the designation for all those traditions that are outside most of the major religions, i.e. Abrahamics, Buddhists, etc., but that also follow an Earth based path. It usually encompasses folk traditions, like European peasant beliefs and practices, as well as native aboriginal spirituality. However, not all followers of those traditions would choose to call themselves pagan, especially if they also practice some form of Abrahamic religion as well. So it’s best to not to assume, which is why Paganism is a subset of Earth Religions.

Paganism, or Neopaganism, is the modern catch-all phrase for many organized and non-organized Earth based religions and spirituality. Often seen as based on European Aboriginal practices and beliefs, it can also be used to describe traditional African, Asian, and North American spirituality, though less so, largely due to its primarily English usage. By declaring oneself “pagan”, it specifically implies resurgence in traditional Earth Based beliefs, sometimes in defiance of Abrahamics, depending on the area, and a reconstruction of traditional wisdom, knowledge, and connection with Nature as a completion of self and humanity. It can be Deity based, supernatural, or atheistic.

Witchcraft is a subset of Paganism. Because of the etymology and use of the word itself, witchcraft usually means pre-Christian folk beliefs of Western and sometimes Eastern Europe. As a modern practice, it has two main elements, either one of which may be included. It is both tribal and a religious choice. For most, it involves the preference of using magic as meditation, prayer, ritual and empowerment. For a smaller group, they are born into families that are known for the “Gift”, “Second Sight”, or the “Eye” if you are less popular… In the past in most places, children born into these families or who showed potential would often have been trained and dedicated to help their communities. A few of these families that survived the Abrahamic purgings retained the gifts and occasionally the training and traditions that went along with them, though most rejected them, usually out of real fear and concern for their safety if they weren’t outright converted.

Like many reClaimed traditions, such as native spirituality, modern witchcraft is a combination of contemporary writings and current analysis of past traditions, as well as past and extant examples of country and folk rituals, and to a much smaller extent, of witch families and their practices. Due to recent advances in cultural archaeology, it is also undergoing the greatest updates and flux. Though most are not from family traditions, modern witches can follow the folk beliefs of the aboriginal Europeans, or practice magic, or both. They can also refer to themselves as witches if they come from a witch family or have the traditional innate abilities, without practising a folk religion or spellcraft. Or any combinations of the above, including practising witchcraft in other traditions, like Abrahamics. (Jewitches. Heh.) It’s a pretty broad category, but my usual test is – anything that can get you burnt as a witch by fundies usually qualifies you to self-identify as a witch. Spellcraft, Goddess worship, foretelling, healing… But not that heretic stuff. That’s totally different.

Due to its heavy reliance on magic and its European structure, Wicca is almost entirely a subset of Witchcraft, though there are a few practitioners who could be considered outside of it, such as high magicians. Wicca is a relatively new tradition, with its origins largely in the middle part of last century, with some of the structure extending back into the Victorian era. Drawing on what was known at the time of folk history and tradition, it is a conglomeration of primarily European beliefs, but also reflects turn of the century Orientalism with elements of ancient Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Asian references. Though slow to start, in the last few decades it has had hundreds of writers popularizing it, and has seen an explosion in individual sects. Because of its very modern feel and adaptations while retaining an aura of Romanticism, Wicca is one of the largest and best known segments of Witchcraft and neopaganism, and one of the fastest growing religions in the world.

Wiccans are almost always witches, but witches aren’t always Wiccan. Wiccan is not the ‘politically correct’ term for witch. It’s a sect of witchcraft, like Protestantism is for Christians. They have certain specific beliefs and rituals that identify them as a group. You wouldn’t call all Christians Protestants, would you? (*Hence, the Venn diagram.) I hope that clears things up, especially for the well meaning but less knowledgeable.

Heathenism is a collective category of paganism who follow the Old Religion and who will sometimes consider themselves Wiccan if they practice magic but usually don’t identify as witches at all. Primarily men, they can be of a more structured faith, like Druids, or more folk based, like Odinists. They often identify with warrior culture and value traditional knowledge, self-reliance, personal strength and honour.

This is a very brief sketch, of course, and some in the community will dispute these categories. There are lots of others as well. Wizards, or High Magic practitioners, for example, deal with the Other World and its denizens in a rigid, formalized manner, and so can be from nearly any religion, including Abrahamics. From what our current literature refers to, these are the general starting points and what most persons will intend to convey when they use these terms at the moment. As neopaganism is one of the fastest growing religions on the planet, however, I have little doubt that these terms will alter considerably in the next decade or so.

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Footnotes:
*Venn diagram is here:
http://gifts-of-nature.blogspot.ca/2012/10/im-witch-not-wiccan-brief-summary-of.html

Life, Journey, and the Challenge

Life, Journey, and the Challenge

Author: Silverghost

I have been thinking a lot lately. About everything that I have been experiencing, things going on in my life, where I want to go. So I wanted to write some things down, and while I started doing that, I found I had something to say.

So here I am writing this article, spilling my soul as it where — to send out a message to others who may be doing the same thing as I am right now. So that’s why I have named this article ‘Life, Journey, and the Challenge’ because that’s what I just came up with in my head while writing this.

I’m a Witch. I have not chosen a spiritual path as of yet, but Pagan will do just fine. I have been opening up to the world since I started out on my journey. I have felt, seen, and done many new things that I have never done, or have not done for a long time. Something magical that brings imagination and life into the equation.

I have been finding something that I have not seen since I was very young. So now here I am, a witch coming into his powers as it where, and finding that I am doing what I should be doing.

Of course many questions have come to mind. Where will all this lead? what will my future be like, how will I turn out. There are things I want to be able to do, and I try hard to make that happen. There are things I want to do; places I want to go. There are people I want to meet, things I want to learn.

But right now I am stuck going to college, working, doing what most Americans do. But I keep finding that I am not satisfied with this. So I dream, and I dream.

I kind of know what I want out of life; I kind of have an idea where I want to end up. So now I am trying to see who I really am. I have been picking my mind for memories, ideas, and experiences. I even have been watching old family movies to see what I was like, who I was then.

I have been meditating, and organizing my mind. This in turn has also helped me open up even more to things because the person I am is a person who is open, and full of energy. I am a happy go lucky guy who just wants to live. So I have an idea who I am now…

Okay…Even after all this, I still have no idea.

Yes that is right, I am as lost as ever. There is a saying that I always have liked to say. It is a little something that I came up with, but at the time I really did not see it as I do now.

“It’s not the Reward, It is the challenge.”

I came up with that a while ago, but only now see it for what it is. It does not matter who I will become, where I will end up, or what will happen to me. What matters is I try my hardest; I keep pushing myself, and keep learning. When life throws me a challenge, I take it. When life sends me a choice, take the hardest path.

As long as I push myself, and see what I can really do, then it won’t matter what is in store for the future. Because if I have kept true to myself, then I will be just fine, and even if something happens to me, at least I would have given it all I could. I would have lived my life to the fullest, and there for in turn fulfilled my dreams.

Yes it is true I am still young, 21 to be specific. I also know I as a young person may not know as much as older people may know. But I hope that I can show a side of me in this article that I normally don’t show. The adult side of myself, the smart and creative person I am.

This is really the first article I have ever written, I have never written something like this, that others would read. In fact my grammar and spelling are not even good. (Thank you spell check for the help.) But I hope that what I have to say is understandable, and I hope that my words in some way are helpful.

I know some people may not know me; some are close friends, and some just know me by this article. But I really hope, that you will not just read this article as another article, but as one made by someone who is following a similar path as you are.

This is my message to all of you who may read this: let life happen; make choices. Don’t worry about what may happen, or what will happen. Just live life, take it head on, and in the end, you will be happy.

Don’t always take the easy path in life, take the hardest path, and become a stronger sole, a stronger person. Let’s say you have two paths in front of you. One path is 25 miles long and looks beautiful. The other path is 10 miles long but looks very dangerous and scary. You may think that I will pick the longer path because it takes more work, but I choose the short path. The short path is the one filled with danger, and adventure.

That’s one thing you must never forget. The longer path will not always be the best. Sometimes the short path will be the more challenging path, and the most adventure filled one.

And as long as you choose your path, and follow it the best you can, then the reward won’t matter, because you would have already experienced the reward, in doing the challenge.

“It’s not the Reward, It is the challenge.”

Be well.
Shunketsu