Flashback 2007 For Both the Winter and Summer Solstices/Yule and Litha

The Flashbacks will alternate years between WitchesOfTheCraft.com and CovenLife.co. This Yule/Litha Season I am using the years 2007 to 2009.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2007 Page 77

Solstice

The longest, and shortest night of the year, and know to the Druids as Alban Heruin, Solstice marks the height of the Sun’s power and the beginning of their decline as the wheel of the year turns. Celebrations are filled with marriages, music, dancing, racing, feasting, and rituals. Young animals and new babies have been replenished the community. This is a joyous time of renewal.

Stonehenge was aligned to the Summer Solstice Sun about 4,000 years ago. Each Year, thousands of modern Pagans and Witches gather at Stonehenge in celebration of the Summer Solstice. Many other stone-works  aligned to the Summer Solstice, attesting to the widespread importance of this day in cultures around the world.

Summer Solstice is sacred to the Horse Goddess Epona. She is a Mother Goddess of the fruits of the fields and orchards, and represents abundance; the cornucopia is a symbol of Epona’s bounty.

 

Your December 2020 Horoscope for Health, Love, and Success

Here’s what the planets have to say about every facet of your life in the month ahead.

It’s hard to believe that a year like 2020 — which felt like it simultaneously flew by and dragged like no other — is finally coming to a close. And now, it’s December, and a holiday season unlike anything we’ve ever experienced. While it’s *cue groan* an unprecedented time, there are some familiar themes: like every year, December is filled with an urge to reflect, celebrate, connect, and turn attention to visions of how to fill up the blank canvas that is a whole new year.

It’s unsurprising that the last month of the year features two go-getter signs. From November 21 to December 21, the confident sun makes its annual trip through gregarious, jovial, adventure-loving Sagittarius, urging people to bond in a big-hearted way while standing up and speaking out about close-held beliefs. And from December 21 to January 21, it makes its way through driven, pragmatic Capricorn, which strengthens a sense of responsibility and tradition while fueling step-by-step efforts to achieve your personal best.

Sagittarius and Capricorn seasons — the first primed for getting out of your comfort zone, the latter for taking grounded steps to achieve your loftiest goals — join together to make December a month of embracing the moment and plotting ahead. This is a season for reveling in and appreciating all that you have while training your eye on what you want to achieve moving forward, mapping it out, and committing to putting in the work to make it real.

To continue reading this article

Goddess Calendar December 2018 by Kimberly F. Moore

Beginning with Winter Solstice (December 21 this year), the shortest day and longest night of the year, it is time for us to tend our light and plant seeds of luminous hope for the coming year. We gather with those we love, or even in the silence of winter, to fan the flames that will sustain us in the next few months as we keep the promise of Spring and new growth in our hearts.

We welcome the Goddesses of Winter

To read the rest of the Goddess Calendar

December 2020 Moon Details

The Full Moon for this month will occur later in the month on Wednesday, December 30th. The New Moon is earlier in the month on Monday, December 14th.

About December’s Cold Full Moon

December full moon is commonly known in the Northern Hemisphere as the Full Long Nights Moon. It takes its name from the winter solstice, which has the longest night in the year. The Full Long Nights Moon cuts a soaring trajectory through the wintery skies, in direct opposition to the low-hanging sun. This year, it is the very last full moon before the 2019 winter solstice, which makes it the Mourning Moon according to Pagan tradition. For our early Pagan ancestors this was a time of cleansing by stopping bad habits to make one stronger to service the cold winter ahead. The Algonquins called this full moon the Cold Moon, in reference to the cold light it casts upon long winter nights. Strangely enough, in certain other cultures, December’s full moon can actually be associated with warmth.

To the Deborean Clan, the Cold Moon is associated with staying in your cosy home beside a crackling fireplace, surrounded not just by physical warmth, but also the warmth of family and friends. Similarly, the Wishram tribe named December’s full moon the Winter Houses Moon. Given that it coincides with holidays like Yule, Pagans consider this the perfect time to open up your home and provide warmth to those you love, as well as to those who are most vulnerable to the cold of winter.

For those who are more inclined towards solitude, the Full Long Nights Moon provides an excellent opportunity to enjoy your cosy home in peace and quiet. Consider taking lots of restful naps under warm, fluffy comforters, or allowing yourself to lounge in bed in the mornings instead of rising immediately to work. Appropriately, the Native American Zuni tribe called December’s full moon the “Moon Where the Sun Comes Home to Rest”. This full moon is a great time for you to take a long overdue break and recharge, so that you may shine all the brighter when it comes time for you to rise again.

This period of slow restfulness is also very conducive to introspection. When you look inwards and take stock of your life during this time, try to focus on loose ends and the little things that you’ve left hanging throughout the year. As the last full moon that rises before the year draws to a close, the Full Long Nights Moon is a time of endings. Take advantage of this full moon’s energy and bring an end to tasks you’ve been meaning to do, clearing your mind so you can move forward with a clean slate.

As much as the Full Long Nights Moon may be about endings, it is also about beginnings and rebirth. The Sioux Indians’ name for December’s full moon is the “Moon When Deer Shed Their Horns”, thus beginning the process of growing new ones. The Celts, on the other hand, call it the Elder Moon. Elder is fragile and easily damaged, but it’s also full of vitality and recovers very quickly. As the Elder Moon shines upon you, allow yourself to rest and heal from everything that has hurt you over the year, and focus instead on new beginnings and promising areas of growth. This is an excellent time to start planning your New Year’s resolutions and set exciting new goals for the upcoming year.

Local Date and Time for December 2020 Full Moon in major cities around the world:

Los Angeles,
San Francisco,
Vancouver

December 29, 2020
7:28pm PST

Denver,
Salt Lake City,
Calgary

December 29, 2020
8:28pm MST

Chicago,
Houston,
San Antonio

December 29, 2020
9:28pm CST

New York,
Toronto,
Atlanta

December 29, 2020
10:28pm EST
To find times in other cities all around Mother Earth

November 2020 All Zodiac Signs Horoscope

Aries (March 21-Apr. 19) According to your monthly horoscope, November 2020 is the time every year when your interactions with others intensify, dear Aries, as the Scorpio Sun travels in the part of your chart where you merge your energies with others on every level – psychologically, philosophically, intellectually, financially and sexually.

What adds to this powerhouse energy this year is the cycle of Mars, your ruling planet also in intense, magical Scorpio after the 11th. Be prepared for the urge to merge to continue as the Scorpio New Moon on the 12th begs the question: What do you most want from your relationships and what are you willing to invest to get it? Well, this is the time to plant those seeds, oh pioneer of the zodiac. And while you are always prepared in life to go it alone because others usually can’t keep up with your pace, you know that when you align with others, it’s much more exciting and fulfilling.

To find your signs horoscope click on the following link. If you use this content (in english or translated), please add a link to the source ! https://www.yearly-horoscope.org/november-monthly/

Guiding Goddess and Lunar Horoscope for November 2020

November 2020 guides us into a space of duality and the gifts of transformation. This month, it is the dark love and dedication of the Egyptian Goddess Nephthys which guides our journey.

Nephthys is the Egyptian Goddess of the Dead, Divine Psychopomp, and the Keeper of the Hidden. In Egyptian mythology, she is the daughter of Geb and Nut, and sister to Osiris, Isis, and Set.  The mirror image of the Goddess Isis in both appearance and skill, she is at times considered to be the shadow side of her sister instead of a separate entity. She is consort and sister-wife of Set, the evil God of deserts, disorder, storms and violence. In later periods of antiquity, Nephthys is said to have consorted with Osiris to become mother of Anubis, the God of the Dead.

Nephthys is the Greek translation of the ancient Egyptian Nbt Hwt, and has been translated as  Mistress of the House, the house being the temple, tomb, or divine space. According to the Pyramid Texts, Nephthys was a powerful Goddess, before whom demons trembled in fear. Her magical spells and guidance were necessary for any soul navigating the various levels of Duat,…

To continue reading click here

Some Names for the October Full Moon Phase

These are for the Northern Hemisphere. I am sorry some of the wording is so small. If you can print out the page the wording will be larger or go to our affiliated website covenlife.co because for some reason all the pictures are larger.

Sorry this is the only one I could fine for the Southern Hemisphere. I am also sorry it is not larger. If you can print out the page the wording will be larger or go to our affiliated website covenlife.co because for some reason all the pictures are larger.

Full Moon in Sagittarius

Sagittarius is the Visionary, the Truth Teller, the Seeker. This Full Moon underlines the archetypal Quest, and the first steps taken on a hero’s journey. This Moon coincides with a lunar eclipse and is a good time to step out of your comfort zones and expand the boundaries of what is possible in our lives. It is a time to make a bid foe freedom, to shake of the shackles of the exceptions of others, and to envision a world of adventure, learning, and explorations. Clarify your goals and let the arrows of truth hit their mark. Sagittarius is connected to Artemis, goddess of the hunt and the Moon, protector of wild spaces and young girls. She values her freedom and independence, yet she also aligned with a philosophical, mystical aspect. This is a good time to work magic for rejecting the confines of patriarchy, to claim independence and the courage to live as we decree.

Artemis, teach me to rewild myself. To hone my vision and step into uncharted places with the fearless confidence of the Seeker and the heart of the Mystic.

Guiding Goddesses: Artemis, Diana, Flidais, Fanta

Copyright 2020 Danielle Blackwood Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook Page 85

 

Crafting Your Own Sacred Schedule – Part 2

(Parts 1, 3, 5,7 for this topic will be posted on Coven Life. Parts 2, 4, 6, 8 will be posted on Witches of The Craft)

Anniversaries, Birthdays, and Other Important Life Moments

The first category may seem pretty obvious, but we often tend to not look at these dates in a spiritual context. We may even view them as obligations versus observances over time. Birthdays aren’t just about getting older; they are opportunities to reflect on the events that took place in the past year and set goals for the next year. A birthday can serve as a reminder for us to be kinder to ourselves.

Marking the beginnings of a relationship (wedding, union, handfasting, etc.) is a great time to remember what brought you together and what you have accomplished along the way. Similarly, anniversaries of endings can be moments to recall we have come and how we have changed. For example, nearly a decade after the fact, I still remember the date when I finally decided to end an abusive relationship. It marks not only the end but also a new beginning, the new me. Celebrate your moments of strength in dark times as well as your triumphs in the best of times.

What other important moments mark significant changes in your life? A college graduation date, the day you arrived in a new place, an initiation or elevation into a tradition, the day you met you best friend, or the day you reconciled with someone — all are possible things you might choose to acknowledge on a yearly basis.

Copyright by Laura Tempst Zakroof Llewellyn;s Witches’ Datebook 2020 Pages 20 to 23

April 3 Moon Goddess’ Current Moon Phase

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 2020

On this day, the Moon will be in a Waxing Gibbous phase. This phase is when the Moon is more than 50% illuminated but not yet a Full Moon. The phase lasts round 7 days, with the Moon becoming more illuminated each day until the Full Moon. During a Waxing Gibbous, the Moon will rise in the east in mid-afternoon and will be high in the eastern sky at sunset. The Moon is then visible though most of the night sky setting a few hours before sunrise. The word Gibbous first appeared in the 14th century and has its roots in the Latin word “gibbosus,” meaning humpbacked.

From Moongiant.com

You can use this link to go forward or backward in time for Moon phase information. If you are curious, you can even find out what phase the Moon was in when you or anyone else you know was on the date the person was born.

Sabbat: NH Ostara Sunday, March 22nd, SH Mabon Monday, March 23rd

All Witches and Pagans are invited to join the Heart’s Spirit Coven as we celebrate Ostara in the Northern Hemisphere and Mabon in the Southern Hemisphere

WHEN:

Sunday, March 22nd, 2020 NH

Monday, March 23rd, 2020 SH

At 6:00 PM CDT NH/ 10.00 AM AEDT SH

Circle starts at 7:00 PM CDT NH/ 11.00 AM AEDT SH- SHARP.

45 minutes will be allocated for a chance to talk to our Brothers and Sisters. Please do not enter the chat room once the circle has started. Thank you!

WHERE:

Heart’s Spirit Coven Chatroom

 

Beginning the Sabbat with a Universal Prayer

Just before we begin our Sabbat, I would like to acknowledge all that has happened and is happening in 2020, before and beyond. It is a significant time of much change and challenges for both humanity and the Great Earth Mother and all within her. Let us take a minute to pray for the universal healing in this time of need.

“May the Great Mother and Great Father give us strength and refuge in our time of need. Help us to remain calm and strong in the face of uncertainty, help us find compassion without the overwhelming feeling of empathy. Great Mother and Father teach me humility, acceptance and to remember my kindness”

So mote it be……..

 

Ostara in the NH

Ying Yang Drawing for OSTARA

 

You will need (aside from your altar usual set up)

See how to set up basic elemental altar below:

https://covenlife.co/2017/07/06/simple-basic-altar-set-up/

Green Candle

White candle

Yin/Yang  Symbol- cut out the wholes specified once printed, or you can draw or paint the symbol.

2 eggs colored one darker one lighter

 

Mabon in the SH

You will need (aside from your altar usual set up)

See how to set up basic elemental altar below:

https://covenlife.co/2017/07/06/simple-basic-altar-set-up/

 

A wicker basket

Red Apple

Fallen Branch

Seasonal fruit and vegetables

Incense of your choice

Knife to cut apple

Picture of a large pentacle (I use a pentacle disk or you can draw or print one on a piece of paper)

A candle-(the larger the better, one to re-light, whenever you wish to contemplate during the winter months over your magickal and mystical path. If your candle runs low transfer the light to another large candle with love and intent of the energy of the first. Contemplations are done for short periods of time so candle needs to burn for only a couple of minutes at a time, longer if you wish it is purely up to you. Note; DO NOT BLOW OUT CANDLE, SNUFF THE CANDLE INSTEAD)

See how to snuffing candle

Set up for Ritual:

Mabon SH

Sweep your circle with a broom clockwise (use whatever you have on hand, it’s about physically cleaning your space)

Place the wicker basket with seasonal fruit and vegetables in the center of alter

Tree branch to the right of the wicker basket

Ostara NH

Sweep your circle with a broom clockwise (use whatever you have on hand, it’s about physically cleaning your space)

Have your Yin/Yang symbol prepared, holes cut out as indicated on diagram provided ready for ritual

Hard boil your eggs, colour one darker than the other ready to place on symbol

Purify the self and the Environment NH & SH:

Take a shower or bath with your favorite oils

Play your favorite music

Burn your favorite incense

Meditate and ground yourself

Ostara is the beginning of spring, the season for new beginnings and the renewal of life through planting. This is the time we can now plant seeds and nurture them throughout the coming months to bare their fruit. What is it that you would like to plant in your life? What are you willing to nurture throughout the growing season? For this ritual as this season is also a time for re-birth, new life and fertility we will be concentrating on the symbology of the egg. Think of the dark and light as the feminine and the masculine. The Goddess and the God resorting your outer and inner balance.

Mabon is the second of 3 harvest festivals celebrating the equinox and the harvest of apples. On the day of the equinox, day and night is of equal length. For the next 6 months the nights will be longer than the days.  This is such a great time of abundance. All the hard work that it takes to collect the harvest, it is now a time to rest, reap what you have sown and take the time to look at you hopes and aspirations and reflect how they have manifested. Most importantly spend it with the people you love. This is a time of giving, sharing and loving.

 

Cast the Circle:

Hypatia Casting the circle-

To the Guardians of the North:

I call you into our Watchtowers to protect us.

 

To the Guardians of the East:

I call you into our Watchtowers to protect us.

 

To the Guardians of the South:

I call you into our Watchtowers to protect us.

 

To the Guardians of the West:

I call you into our Watchtowers to protect us.

 

I cast this circle three times three with the assistance of the Great Mother and the Great God.

I call Upon the Guardians of spirit to protect us from above and below. As is above so is below, as is below so is above. May the power of The Great God and The great Goddess join us within this circle now, to protect us and to work with us and allow us to see beyond the veil.

Protect us Great Mother and Great Father for all gathered here and those afar who are unable to be with us. Allow no negative energy to touch us, to harm us and that nothing we call upon will harm us and others. We come together in perfect love and perfect trust.

Greeting:

Hypatia – Merry meet brothers and sisters and honored guests.

Everyone – Respond Merry Greet. Please tell us your first name and state or country you are from.

Ceremony:

Please ALL light your main altar candles (not the Mabon or Ostara candles as yet)

Ritual begins:

Ostara

Place green candle to your left and the white candle to your right. Leaving enough room in the middle to place your Yin/Yang symbol.
Place the Yin/Yang symbol in between the lit candles. Place the darker egg into the hole in the lighter colored side of the Yin/Yang and the lighter colored egg into the hole in the darker side.
When done type in “Ready.”
We offer these eggs to Ostara as all new life grows from an eggs or a seed.
Ostara we ask you to bless these eggs to help us renew ourselves as Mother Earth wakens from her slumber. That we may find new life coursing through us as cleansing energy.
Oak King we ask that your fertilize the hopes and wishes we have written here so they may grow and come to fruition as the year progresses.
As the Spring Equinox is the balance of day and night as equals so is the relationship of all males and females. We ask Hecate and her Consort to bless our relationships with others be they men or women. That we feel equal to them and not above or below them.
Take the eggs and set them on the side. Tape the circle of opposite color into the now empty holes. (Before breaking the eggs to eat them write the same runes on to the circles now in the Yin/Yang symbol. The side you write them on should be the same color as the egg they are written on.
We will take a 2 minutes to complete the Yin/Yang symbol. When you are done type in “Blessed be”.

 

Mabon

Your wand in right hand, facing your alter, arms stretched out above head……….

“Autumn Queen and Harvest God I honor Thee. As the change of seasons begins the Wheel has turned once more. A time to reflect, a time to come together in the here and now in this sacred space where all time becomes one. The second harvest has been reaped, now take the time to rest and feel the change as the season passes from one to the next.

My Mother, go now and slumber

My Father go now and dream of re-birth”

Arms outstretched, lower your head and close your eyes, sit in contemplation for 30 seconds.

When ready open your eyes and lower your arms

Pick up the apple and place it on the pentacle

Cut the apple crosswise to reveal the pentagram bringing the elements into your life

Lift the half apple up as in offering and say….

“The year gives way to the next as the season passes and the Great Wheel turns. Ancestors, Guardians and Wise ones guide me. Every begging has an ending and every ending a new beginning”.

Light your Mabon candle now

Take a bite of the apple, put aside to share with nature later

Take the tree branch and shake in each direction, starting with the North, then West, South, East and say…….

“Allow me to remember the summer past as the days grow longer and the days shorter. Memories will warm my soul as the sunlight fades and hearth becomes inviting through this divine light of the candle dedicated to the Mother and Father.

Great Mother calls me forward to rest and lull myself to sleep with her songs as I cling myself to her bosom”.

Face the altar and branch held out in front of you and say……

“May I never forget the summer memories and continue to strive during the colder months. May I take this time to go within and reflect on the Mysteries that lead me to a better understanding of myself, of others and all that is in life and death”.

Put the tree branch back on the altar, take 30 seconds to contemplate about :

The symbols that you have mentally attached to this ritual,

The various projects that you will put in action over the winter months, no matter how small or insignificant they may feel.

After the ceremony please feel free to share the consecrated fruit and vegetables in a beautiful meal with family and friends. Make a beautiful dinner for all to enjoy and be thankful for what is.

 

CLOSING

Dismiss the circle:

  • To the Guardians of the North:

I dismiss and thank you from our Watchtowers and give Gratitude for protect us.

 

  • To the Guardians of the West:

I dismiss and thank you from our Watchtowers and give Gratitude for protect us.

 

  • To the Guardians of the South:

I dismiss and thank you from our Watchtowers and give Gratitude for protect us.

 

  • To the Guardians of the East:

I dismiss and thank you from our Watchtowers and give Gratitude for protect us.

 

As you leave here tonight may the Lady and Lord bless you with all that you need.

 

I bid you Blessings and great Joy Brothers and sisters of the Craft

 

Thank you and farewell

 

Full Moon in Virgo

During the Full Moon in Virgo, we turn to the task of separating grain from the chaff, to bring the things in our lives to order. Virgo is the practical priestess—the healer—connected to archetype of the Virgin Goddess, Hestia, who teaches us the value of intentional solitude. Virgo medicine show us how to be discriminating and hone things down to their essentials. She is the solitary Witch in the forest who tends the herbs by the Moon. The one who knows that rituals of daily life are sacred, that the body is the temple, and that service in the spiritual practice. Now is the time to synthesize, refine, and make the things of our lives sound. To know just what medicine is required, to dispel illusion and see into the heart of the matter.

Hestia, help me sort the seeds. Help me know when it is time to harvest and when it is time to let something die on the vine. Show me the magic of a simple well-ordered life.

Guiding Goddesses: Hestia, Astrea, Frigg

Copyright by Danielle Blacwood in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2020 Page 55

Pagan Calendar of Observances

JANUARY

JAN. 1: Hag’s Day – honoring the goddess as She Who Transforms
Day of Ishtar ( Inanna, Ashtart, Ashtaroth, Ashtoreth, Anat, Astarte, Anaitgis, Atar, Isis): Goddess of Love & Battle.

JAN. 2-3: Feast of Old to Greek Goddess Hekate – who guides all through transitions and crisis.

JAN. 6: Triple Goddess Day—honoring the Goddess as the Three-In-One;
Day of the Lord of the Dance – honoring Shiva, seeking his aid for prosperity and wisdom in the New Year, and for prosperity and wisdom in the New Year, and also for a spouse if desired.

JAN. 9: Festival of Isis: Mother Goddess, Great Goddess, Throne of Egypt

JAN. 16: Festival of Ganesh: God of Success

JAN. 17-18 Tu B’Shevat – Jewish Festival of Trees, celebrated with tree plantings and orchard blessings. Originally honored Old Canaanite-Hebrew Goddess Asherah.

JAN. 17-19 Feast of Fate – Ruler of Past, present, and Future, honoring Goddess as Moirai (old Greek), Norns (Old Norse), Coatlicue (Aztec), Pachamama (Inca), Manat (Old Arabic-Sufi) & Providence (Christian).

JAN. 18: Day of Danu – Celebrating the Great Mother Goddess who Shows the Way.

JAN. 23: Egyptian Day of Hathor: Goddess of Love, Tombs and the Sky.

JAN. 24-Feb 1 Sementivae – Old Roman festival of sowing, honoring Earth Goddess Terra (Greek Gaia), Grain Goddess Ceres (Greek Demeter), and Seed Goddess Proserpina (Greek Persephone).

To see entire year

FULL MOON AND NEW MOON CALENDAR FOR 2020

This Full Moon and New Moon calendar lists all Full and New Moons for 2020 with exact times in UTC. For more details and exact times in your location click on each months listing

Full Moon and New Moon Calendar
January » Full Moon
Jan 10, 2020
19:21 UTC
New Moon
Jan 24, 2020
21:42 UTC
February » Full Moon
Feb 9, 2020
07:33 UTC
New Moon
Feb 23, 2020
15:32 UTC
March » Full Moon
Mar 9, 2020
17:47 UTC
New Moon
Mar 24, 2020
09:28 UTC
April » Full Moon
Apr 8, 2020
02:35 UTC
New Moon
Apr 23, 2020
02:25 UTC
May » Full Moon
May 7, 2020
10:45 UTC
New Moon
May 22, 2020
17:38 UTC
June » Full Moon
Jun 5, 2020
19:12 UTC
New Moon
Jun 21, 2020
06:41 UTC
July » Full Moon
Jul 5, 2020
04:44 UTC
New Moon
Jul 20, 2020
17:33 UTC
August » Full Moon
Aug 3, 2020
15:59 UTC
New Moon
Aug 19, 2020
02:41 UTC
September » Full Moon
Sep 2, 2020
05:22 UTC
New Moon
Sep 17, 2020
11:00 UTC
October » Full Moon
Oct 1, 2020
21:05 UTC
New Moon
Oct 16, 2020
19:31 UTC
Full Moon
Oct 31, 2020
14:49 UTC
November » New Moon
Nov 15, 2020
05:07 UTC
Full Moon
Nov 30, 2020
09:30 UTC
December » New Moon
Dec 14, 2020
16:16 UTC
Full Moon
Dec 30, 2020
03:28 UTC

Humans have a strong affinity for the moon. It’s waxing and waning has formed the basis for calendars across continents and cultures. Almanacs charted full moons so farmers could work by its light. The full moon has been affiliated with harvests, festivals, wolves, and insanity. The very word “lunacy” stems from people’s ideas of mental stability and the moon’s phases. Full moons have captured imaginations across cultures and time, and many cultures have named the various full moons. 2020 is notable in that it will not have twelve full moons, but thirteen. The thirteenth full moon is called a blue moon. About every nineteen years, the opposite occurs, in that February will not have a full moon. This is referred to as a black moon. Each moon of the year has its own name and connotations depending on the season.

January’s full moon is often referred to as the Wolf Moon. It can also be called the Moon after Yule, in reference to the pagan holiday of Yule supplanted by Christmas. The early Catholic Church incorporated pagan holidays into their calendar to help conversion, which is why they coincide with holidays like Yule or solstice celebrations. February’s moon is usually called a Snow Moon since it tends to snow a lot in February. Some Native American tribes call it a Hunger Moon due to scarce food supplies.

March’s full moon is called the Worm Moon to signify the return of earthworms in the winter thaw as the season’s transition. Many names are attributed to March’s moon, such Crow Moon, Sap Moon for maple syrup season, and the old Anglo-Saxon term Lenten Moon. As the name implies, the Lenten Moon is the only full moon to occur during Lent. Continuing the Easter theme, an old Anglo-Saxon term for April’s full moon was Paschal Moon, in reference to the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The more common name for April’s moon in modern times is Pink Moon, as pink phlox flowers bloom that month.

Whereas April’s moon is for one flower, May’s full moon is called the Flower Moon to signify the massive bloom following April’s rainfall. The less romantic but more practical Corn Planting Moon is another name. As mentioned earlier, farmers like full moons because they can work under its light if the sky is clear. June is called the Strawberry Moon as that month is the peak of the season. Mead Moon is another name, as fermenting started earlier in the year to produce a proper drink. Continuing the new season’s growth, July is often called Buck Moon because male deer’s antlers start growing around this time. Since July often has many thunderstorms, Thunder Moon is another term for July’s full moon.

August, the last full month of summer, has many names related to food and bounty. The Algonquin tribes called it Sturgeon Moon as the lakes filled with fish. The Anglo-Saxons called it the Grain Moon, and some called it the Barley Moon or Green Corn Moon. The importance of the harvest and it’s relation to the moons grows stronger in the autumn. September’s moon is called the Corn Moon, though the Farmer’s Almanac used to refer to it as the Harvest Moon based on the Anglo-Saxon term.

In modern times, the Harvest Moon is in October, and in fact this happens every three years because the Harvest Moon is based on the equinox, not the calendar. Hunter’s Moon is the term for October’s full moon otherwise, since it’s prime hunting season and the time when northern peoples would stock up on meat for the winter. In 2020, the Blue Moon will occur on Halloween, making it even more extraordinary for moon fans.

To end the year, November is often called the Beaver Moon as beavers tend to be the most active in that month. It can also be called the Frost Moon since frost starts to form at night. If November’s full moon is the last before the winter solstice, it is called the Mourning Moon. Winter is often considered a season of death due to the migration of wildlife and trees bereft of leaves. December is aptly called the Cold Moon since winter starts in that month. The Anglo-Saxons once called the full moon the Moon before Yule, in reference to the holiday occurring around the winter solstice as mentioned before. It can also be called the Oak Moon, though this term can also apply to November. Either way, the history of the full moon’s names is long and spans many cultures and traditions.

From Moongiant.com

You can use this link to go forward or backward in time for Moon phase information. If you are curious you can even find out what phase the Moon was in when you or anyone else you know was on the date the person was born.