The Witches Correspondences for Monday

Moon Vampire
The Witches Correspondences for Monday

Day: Monday ( Moon-day)

Planet: Moon

Colors: Silver and White and Grey

Crystals: Moonstone, Pearl, Aquamarine, Silver, Selenite

Aroma: Jasmine, Lemon, Sandalwood, Moon Oil, African violet, Honeysuckle, Myrtle, Willow, and Wormwood
Herb: Moonwort

The sacred day of the Moon, personified by such goddesses as Selene, Luna, Diana, and Artemis. The Moon is ruler of flow affecting the changeable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, its powers are at their most potent.

Magical aspects: peace, sleep, healing, compassion, friendships, psychic awareness, purification, and fertility

Monday is ruled by the moon – an ancient symbol of mystery and peace. Monday is a special day for mothers as the cycle of the moon has long been associated with the female menstrual cycle. Those wishing to conceive a baby would be wise to try on a Monday as the magic of motherhood is strong and pregnancy is in the air.

This is the proper day of the week to perform spells and rituals involving agriculture, animals, female fertility, messages, reconciliation’s, theft, voyages, dreams, emotions, clairvoyance, home, family, medicine, cooking, personality, merchandising, psychic work, Faerie magic, and Goddess rituals.

A Page of Bind Runes for Your Book of Shadows (Printable)

Flashback 2007 For Both the Winter and Summer Solstices/Yule and Litha

The Flashbacks will alternate years between WitchesOfTheCraft.com and CovenLife.co. This Yule/Litha Season I am using the years 2007 to 2009.

Copyright Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2007 Page 77

Solstice

The longest, and shortest night of the year, and know to the Druids as Alban Heruin, Solstice marks the height of the Sun’s power and the beginning of their decline as the wheel of the year turns. Celebrations are filled with marriages, music, dancing, racing, feasting, and rituals. Young animals and new babies have been replenished the community. This is a joyous time of renewal.

Stonehenge was aligned to the Summer Solstice Sun about 4,000 years ago. Each Year, thousands of modern Pagans and Witches gather at Stonehenge in celebration of the Summer Solstice. Many other stone-works  aligned to the Summer Solstice, attesting to the widespread importance of this day in cultures around the world.

Summer Solstice is sacred to the Horse Goddess Epona. She is a Mother Goddess of the fruits of the fields and orchards, and represents abundance; the cornucopia is a symbol of Epona’s bounty.

 

What is a curse, Hex, Jinx?

  • What is a curse, Hex, Jinx?
    A hex is generally a spell or bewitchment. It is derived from “hexe”, a German word for “witch”, and comes from the folklore of the Pennsylvania Dutch. In folklore it can be good or bad, but now is generally known by its negative connotations. Hexes can be made for hire, with the witch being able to be paid for both inflicting a hex and for removing a hex.A jinx is the continual or repeated bad luck. It is usually the result of a fatal accident. One of the more famous jinxes comes with the Hope Diamond. In the 17th century Madame de Montespan, the mistress of King Louis XIV, owned the diamond and it is during this time that the stone is said to have become jinxed. She was believed to have conducted so called “black masses”. Over 100 years later, King Henry the XVI gave the Hope Diamond to Marie Antoinette. Ms. Antoinette loaned this piece to her friend the Princesse de Lamballe. Not only did both Princesse de Lamballe and Marie Antoinette get executed, but every other owner of the Hope Diamond has suffered a tragic demise.A curse is a malevolent spell that is purposefully done to inflict harm upon another. It has been a part of magic and alchemy since the beginning, and can also be done by Catholic priests. It is derived from “cursein”, an Anglo Saxon worse meaning “to invoke harm or evil upon”. Curses can be both spoken and written. Cursed objects can affect people with bad luck, misfortune, ill health, and even death.

Correspondences for Monday

 

Correspondences for Monday

 

Day: Monday ( Moon-day)

Planet: Moon

Colors: Silver and White and Grey

Crystals: Moonstone, Pearl, Aquamarine, Silver, Selenite

Aroma: Jasmine, Lemon, Sandalwood, Moon Oil, African violet, Honeysuckle, Myrtle, Willow, and Wormwood

Herb: Moonwart

The sacred day of the Moon, personified by such goddesses as Selene, Luna, Diana, and Artemis. The Moon is ruler of flow affecting the changeable aspects of people. If a full moon falls on a Monday, its powers are at their most potent.

Magical aspects: peace, sleep, healing, compassion, friendships, psychic awareness, purification, and fertility

Monday is ruled by the moon – an ancient symbol of mystery and peace. Monday is a special day for mothers as the cycle of the moon has long been associated with the female menstrual cycle. Those wishing to conceive a baby would be wise to try on a Monday as the magic of motherhood is strong and pregnancy is in the air.

This is the proper day of the week to perform spells and rituals involving agriculture, animals, female fertility, messages, reconciliation’s, theft, voyages, dreams, emotions, clairvoyance, home, family, medicine, cooking, personality, merchandising, psychic work, Faerie magic, and Goddess rituals

Halloween in Ireland

Terrifying tales and frightening facts from the home of Halloween

Halloween – a time for thrills, chills and scaring ourselves silly. But did you know that everyone’s favourite fright-filled holiday began in Ireland? Trace Halloween right back to its origins and you’ll find yourself in the mists of pagan Ireland over 3,000 years ago – a time when the ancient festival of Samhain was celebrated in the heart of Ireland’s Ancient East to mark the beginning of winter.

It’s said that at Halloween the boundary between our world and the Otherworld is at its thinnest, allowing spirits and demons to easily pass between the two. So come with us on a strange and spooky journey as we experience Halloween in Ireland.

Halloween in Ireland

Beltane – Bealtaine Traditions in Irish Folklore

Beltane is the anglicised version of our Irish word Bealtaine – still in use and meaning ‘the month of May’ in our own language. Bealtaine is mentioned in some of the earliest Irish literature, and it is associated with important events in Irish mythology.

Irish folklore still holds the legacy of the traditions and customs associated with this ancient festival. Bealtaine and Samhain are the original two turning points for the ‘wheel of the year’ in Ireland. That’s May Eve and Hallowe’en, in case you’re not familiar.

These major Irish Pagan Festivals were pivotal – literally – times of upheaval of change for our ancestors over 8,000 years ago when the Hunter Gatherer societies moved from their Summer to Winter camping grounds at these seasonal turning points, and they still resonate through the landscape and the Irish communities to this day.

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Beltane: (Bealtaine, Valpurgis)

Incense: Lilac, Frankincense
Decorations: Maypole, Flowers, Ribbons
Colours: Green

The Fire Festival of Beltane

This festival is also known as Beltane, the Celtic May Day. It officially begins at moonrise on May Day Eve, and marks the beginning of the third quarter or second half of the ancient Celtic year. It is celebrated as an early pastoral festival accompanying the first turning of the herds out to wild pasture. The rituals were held to promote fertility. The cattle were driven between the Belfires to protect them from ills. Contact with the fire was interpreted as symbolic contact with the sun. In early Celtic times, the druids kindled the Beltane fires with specific incantations. Later the Christian church took over the Beltane observances, a service was held in the church, followed by a procession to the fields or hills, where the priest kindled the fire. The rowan branch is hung over the house fire on May Day to preserve the fire itself from bewitchment (the house fire being symbolic of the luck of the house).

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Beltane by The Goddess & The Green Man

Sunset to Sunset.

Beltane honours Life. It represents the peak of Spring and the beginning of Summer. Earth energies are at their strongest and most active. All of life is bursting with potent fertility and at this point in the Wheel of the Year, the potential becomes conception. On May Eve the sexuality of life and the earth is at its peak. Abundant fertility, on all levels, is the central theme. The Maiden goddess has reached her fullness. She is the manifestation of growth and renewal, Flora, the Goddess of Spring, the May Queen, the May Bride. The Young Oak King, as Jack-In-The-Green, as the Green Man, falls in love with her and wins her hand. The union is consummated and the May Queen becomes pregnant. Together the May Queen and the May King are symbols of the Sacred Marriage (or Heiros Gamos), the union of Earth and Sky, and this union has merrily been re-enacted by humans throughout the centuries. For this is the night of the Greenwood Marriage. It is about sexuality and sensuality, passion, vitality and joy. And about conception. A brilliant moment in the Wheel of the Year to bring ideas, hopes and dreams into action. And have some fun…..

Traditions of Beltane…

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WHAT IS BELTANE?

One of the four quarter day festivals, Beltane saw members of communities come together to celebrate the return of the summer. The observance of this hugely important time in the turning of the wheel of the year was characterised by a celebration of the return of the fertility of the land, and would have been a time when livestock would have been put out to pasture.

The word ‘Beltane’ roughly translates as ‘bright fire’ and, as such, one of the most important rituals, which survives today in our modern festival, concerns the lighting of the Beltane bonfire. Fire was seen as a purifier and healer and would have been walked around and danced/jumped over by the members of the community. Farmers would also have driven their cattle between bonfires to cleanse and protect them before being put out into the fields.

In ancient communities, all hearth fires would have been extinguished and a new neid fire lit which would have then been used to relight people’s hearths in their own homes. In this way the community was connected to each other by the sacred fire which was central to all. The festival would also have been a time of courtship rituals and a celebration of our own fertility!

The important point to note when thinking about our own festival is the joy and the revelry that is fostered in the ritual. It is about casting off the darkness and celebrating the light. It is a time for celebrating fertility, both in the context of our biological functions as well as our own creative energies, the fertility of our creative community.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND…

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Samhain (Samain) – The Celtic roots of Halloween

As millions of children and adults participate in the fun of Halloween on the night of October 31st, few will be aware of its ancient Celtic roots in the Samhain (Samain) festival. In Celtic Ireland about 2,000 years ago, Samhain was the division of the year between the lighter half (summer) and the darker half (winter). At Samhain the division between this world and the otherworld was at its thinnest, allowing spirits to pass through.

The family’s ancestors were honoured and invited home whilst harmful spirits were warded off. People wore costumes and masks to disguise themselves as harmful spirits and thus avoid harm. Bonfires and food played a large part in the festivities. The bones of slaughtered livestock were cast into a communal fire, household fires were extinguished and started again from the bonfire. Food was prepared for the living and the dead, food for the ancestors who were in no position it eat it, was ritually shared with the less well off.

Christianity incorporated the honouring of the dead into the Christian calendar with All Saints (All Hallows) on November 1st, followed by All Souls on November 2nd. The wearing of costumes and masks to ward off harmful spirits survived as Halloween customs. The Irish emigrated to America in great numbers during the 19th century especially around the time of famine in Ireland during the 1840’s. The Irish carried their Halloween traditions to America, where today it is one of the major holidays of the year. Through time other traditions have blended into Halloween, for example the American harvest time tradition of carving pumpkins.

Two hills in the Boyne Valley were associated with Samhain in Celtic Ireland, Tlachtga and Tara. Tlachtga was the location of the Great Fire Festival which begun on the eve of Samhain (Halloween). Tara was also associated with Samhain, however it was secondary to Tlachtga in this respect.

The entrance passage to the Mound of the Hostages on the Hill of Tara is aligned with the rising sun around Samhain. The Mound of the Hostages is…

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For Your Viewing Pleasure

5 PAGAN TRADITIONS: How the Ancients Celebrated Beltane

Flashback 2004 Beltane

[The Flashbacks will alternate years between WitchesOfTheCraft.com and CovenLife.co]

Beltane

Beltane is the holiday that draws all Witches outside to celebrate the returning power of the SUn and the fecundity of the land.

Wear red robes for ritual and dress your altar in red for passion. If you have identified a nearby rowan tree, you can make a wreath for your hair using rowan sprigs. Decorate your house with freshly cut greens, herbs, and flowers. Arrange for music or drumming to lighten the steps of the dancers of the maypole or spiral dance. Lose yourself in the dance.

Fire is an honored element at this ritual, so have circle members jump a cauldron for purification and protection. Water is another honored element: be certain to visit your local sacred spring or riverbank. Sprinkle perfume into the water for the undines. Again, leave a drop or two of milk and other food offerings for the nature spirits.

Copyright K. D. Spitzer Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2004 Page 63

 

Flashback 2004 Samhain

[The Flashbacks will alternate years between WitchesOfTheCraft.com and CovenLife.co]          

Samhain

Expect the unexpected if you celebrate Samhain—The Celtic New Year— on All Hallows Eve: the planets bring a lot of energetic talk and chaos, and the resultant noise will add exuberance to the ritual. Look for psychic dreams on astrological Samhain, November 6; your intuition will be in top form if you do readings at that ritual. This power is the strongest it has been in several years.

This is the sabbat for wearing your witchy black. Clean the house, including the hearth, from top to bottom; the garden also needs to be prepared for winter by this date. Lay new fires. Feast with your family and set places for your ancestors. Cleanse divination tools (cards, crystals, runes) and rededicate them to the Goddess. For the last harvest festival, put apples, nuts,acorns, and squashes on the altar, and add pictures of the family members you are missing.

Using freshly harvested hazel nuts, make wreaths with nine nuts (three times three) to protect your house from fire and lightening. Offer thanks to the river gods or the god of the sea, and remember to honor the goddess Hecate.

Copyright K. D. Spitzer Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2004 Page 63

 

23 October Southern Hemisphere Custom Planetary Positions

The time for the Custom Planetary Positions is from the local time in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia  

23 October (22) 2020
08:00 pm GMT 6:00 AM AEST
Zodiac: Tropical (Standard Western)

Sun:29 Libra 53
Moon:21 Capricorn 06
Mercury:06 Scorpio 25 Rx
Venus:23 Virgo 41
Mars:18 Aries 25 Rx
Jupiter:19 Capricorn 51
Saturn:25 Capricorn 48
Uranus:09 Taurus 03 Rx
Neptune:18 Pisces 32 Rx
Pluto:22 Capricorn 34

True Lunar Node:21 Gemini 20
Mean Lunar Node:22 Gemini 34 Rx

Lilith (Black Moon):00 Taurus 10

Chiron:06 Aries 09 Rx
Ceres:28 Aquarius 39
Pallas:17 Capricorn 46
Juno:10 Scorpio 46
Vesta:00 Virgo 12

Eris:23 Aries 57 Rx

Fire:3
Earth:9
Air:4
Water:3
Cardinal:9
Fixed:5
Mutable:5

 

If you need to calculate the planetary positions for a specific use and time, click on this link Currentplanetarypositions.com 

 To figure out GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) to your local time use this link  

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