Goddess Knowledge – Venus

Venus is the Roman goddess of grace and love, called Aphrodite by the Greeks. She ever from an early Italian nature goddess, a bringer of spring blooms and vines, a goddess of growth and a beauty of nature. The goddess of desire, Venus was the irresistible personification of both physical and spiritual love. She gave her name to the second planet of dawn and dusk, as did her sister goddess, Inanna (Surmeria) and IsBear (Babylonia).

The story of Venus’s birth tells how she arosed, naked, from the sea, the source of all life (primarily creation) and a symbol of both the collective unconscious and eternity. It is a wonderful image for the emergence of a young woman into her full femininity. Venus is a striking affirmation of the Love of beauty and the pleasure of the senses. Risen from the sea, she is a guide through both the stormy and calm waters of it physical desires and emotions.

For more information about Venus please use this link: https://www.bing.com/search?q=roman+goddess+venus&FORM=HDRSC1

For more information on the Greek goddess Aphrodite please use this link: https://www.bing.com/search?q=greek+goddess+Aphrodite&qs=n&form=QBRE&sp=-1&pq=greek+goddess+&sc=8-14&sk=&cvid=9BD2AD87E86F4F83A36DFB41ED11BA4A

To see images of the Roman goddess Venus please use this link: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=roman+goddess+venus&qs=n&form=QBIR&sp=-1&pq=roman+goddess+venus&sc=8-19&sk=&cvid=C948CCC75BDF47DF88D2A202EE7D293B

To see images of Aphrodite please use this link: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=greek+goddess+Aphrodite&FORM=HDRSC2

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Can Men Be Part of Wicca?

Is there a place for men in Wicca?

I’m always surprised when people ask that, but it seems a fairly common misconception.

Wicca is certainly not just for women! There are plenty of men in Wicca, and plenty of philosophical room for men as well.

To read the rest of this and an extra.link about male witches please use this link: https://www.wicca-spirituality.com/men-wicca.html

Can There Be Witches That Are Also Christians?

This is a subject that has been hotly debated since Christianity first became an accepted religion and the debate I feel that will never have a definite answer.

Some people believe they can at least partially combine Christianity and Paganism usually by still thinking of Jesus as a  god or because many Christians already worship a triple god “the father, son, holy ghost or spirit” and saints to help them with certain things so jumping to a belief in a Triple Goddess and other goddesses isn’t that big of a jump. Many never call upon other gods than those they already believe in. Mostly the Christians that combine The Craft and Christianity are just bring the feminine divine back into their lives.

I have found over the years that the two were combined very early in the ancient history of religions. For example “In a way, Gnosticism is the best example of Hellenic Syncretism” ( see links below for more information). Another example of Christianity and Paganism crossing over is with two major holidays Easter and Ostara also Christmas and Yule. The early Christians trying to convert pagans purposely put the resurrection of Jesus close to Yule the Pagans celebration of the birth of Odin/the Oak King and the coming of the Maiden or spring time of year. So by putting Jesus birth in the wrong season, the Christians could use it to say something like . “See the son of our God is born now also.”

Let me interject here that it has been scientifically proven that the man known for the last 2056 years, give or take a year or two, as Jesus Christ or Jesus of Nazareth or by other names as well was born not born in the winter. There is a debate ongoing in the scientific community over which season and what exact year he was born. (Click the link below for more information) These are not the only holidays that Christians purposely used to convert pagans almost any Sabbat on the Wheel of the Year has a Christian holy day of some sort close to it or even on the same date. (Click on the link below for more information)

I have included a link for YouTube that presents the views of people who say they are Christian WItches.

Now my personal view is how can a person believe that there is a son of God that will cleanse them of all the wrongs they have done to others and/or themselves also believe in the Wicce Rede of “Do as ye will, lest it harm none.” and if you do harm someone with words and/or actions you need to take responsibility for the wrong and apologize or whatever to make what happened a thing of this past and most importantly forgive yourself. We as pagans do not ask a god or goddess to take away our wrongdoings to be free of them we free ourselves of the wrongs we have done. How can a person practice a religion that does not believe in a heaven or hell or satan when that is part of the core of Christianity? Part of the Christian dogma is the 10 commandments of which the first one is “Thou shall have no other God before me.” So does this mean a Christian Witch is breaking one of the main rules of Christianity if they use a different god and/or goddess for a spell and/or ritual? And if they do break the commandment do they ask the son, Jesus, of their one God to forgive them for doing so? Christians are also not supposed to worship idols (which if you go into some of the different denominations of the Christian churches you could see Jesus hanging dead from a cross and other statues of saints. Are they not all ready worshiping idols when they pray to them asking for their help with interceding with God to bring about something in their life? In my personal opinion and also from trying to meld Christianity and Paganism some may be able to justify what they are doing but I could not keep denying the feminine part of the dual nature of the Devine.

I have included in this post a link to a general search on how witches are talked about in all the Christian Bibles. Not one of them is a positive statement toward witchcraft. In fact, all of the passages condemn witchcraft in one way or another. So how can a Christian not follow the book that is supposed to be a guide in how they should live their lives? How can they practice Witchcraft when it is expressly forbidden by the commandments and other passages of the book their faith has been built on?

Some Information About Gnosticism

Some Views on When Jesus was Born

Pagan Holidays Used by Christian for Easier Convergence

Different views on Christians Witches

YouTube Videos on Christian Witches

Biblical View on Witches

I have tried to give you enough information to form your own opinion on whether or not a Christian can also be a Witch that practices Witchcraft. So I would like your viewpoint on whether a person can mix Christianity with Witchcraft/Paganism?

Goddess Knowledge – Eagle Woman

Despite the fact that the life-giving and death-wielding Bird Goddess is one of the oldest representations of the goddess, eagles have usually been linked with the masculine, with a few exceptions (the Sphinx of Egypt had the wings of an eagle, and the Aztec goddess Cihuacoatl was also called Eagle Woman). This Eagle Woman shows a new marriage of the feminine and the eagle. SHe represents all an eagle stands for: spirit, valor, majesty, renewal, accuracy of sight, spiritual aim, and the ability to soar to the heights. She also holds in her hands a vessel, the traditional symbol for the feminine, for that which receives, contains, and nourishes. Here both sets of values are joined, emblematic of a different combinations of strengths that are part of women-born.

Eagle Woman is a joyful affirmation of our ability to break out of millennia-old stereotypes and find new definition the embraces our entire continuum of being alive. She teaches the women can express qualities of the eagle while continuing to contain and nurture.

For more information about the Goddess Eagle Woman please click on this link: Informaton about Eagle Woman

To see images of Eagle WOmen please click on this link: Images of Eagle Woman

Goddess Knowledge – Pele

Pele is the fiery Hawaiian volcano goddess. The daughter of the earth goddess Haimea, Pele came to Hawaii on a boat. Killed in a fight with her sister, the ocean, sho took refuge in the glowing cauldron of Mount Kilauea (this is the volcano that had the major eruption in July 2018 – a link will be below) where she receives the souls of the dead and regenerates them with fire. In a tempestuous relationship with Kamapua`a the ferocious pig god,  she is portrayed as a jealous goddess, her rages manifesting as volcanic eruptions. Revered by Hawaiians even today, she carries the force of the volcano, with its molten lava flow, which even in destrud=ction creates new land. Pele stands for the molten, fierce aspect of life that is unable to do anything halfway. She reminds us that even in the midst of fiery eruption there s creation and new life.

More Information About Pele

Images Of Pele

More Information on Pele’s Home – Mount Kilauea, Hawaii

Can Men Be Wiccan?

The more you read about Wicca and Paganism, the more you may feel that contemporary writings are geared towards female practitioners. Does this mean that Wicca is limited to only women, or than men can’t be Wiccan? Not at all!

Why Paganism Appeals to Women

In fact, Wicca — and other forms of Pagan belief — are not limited to one gender or the other. And if you’re reading this and you’re one of the people who is telling the menfolk they can’t be Wiccan or Pagan, please just stop it right now.

Although the exact percentages aren’t clear, you’ll find that statistically, many more women are drawn to Pagan religions than men, including but not limited to Wicca. Go to any Pagan event, and chances are good that the population is going to skew more towards the ladies than the gents. Why is this? It’s often because Pagan religions, including Wicca, embrace the sacred feminine alongside the power of the masculine. There’s a duality, a polarity in Pagan religions that’s not often found in mainstream faiths. For women, particularly those who were raised in a monotheistic, patriarchal religion, this can be a welcome and empowering change — especially since leadership roles are available equally to women in Pagan spiritual paths.

Also, remember that many Pagan religions were originally fertility religions. Wicca itself certainly is, and some sub-branches of reconstructionist faiths are as well. By its very nature, a fertility cult confers high status upon the feminine.

What About the Menfolk?

So what does this mean in terms of the guys in the community? Does it mean they aren’t welcome in modern Paganism? Hardly. Most traditions of Paganism have room for both the male and the female, often side by side and equal. Although there are some groups that honor only a goddess and not a god, far more are dedicated to both a god and goddess, or in some cases, multiple deities of both genders.

If a ritual looks as though it was written with a female practitioner in mind, consider a couple of possibilities. Is it one that needs to have feminine language in it, such as a rite honoring mothers? Or is it simply that the person who wrote it was female, and so it’s got feminine language in it, but is still something that could be adapted to a masculine perspective? For instance, in the Self Dedication Ritual on this site, one section reads as follows: …

To read the rest of the article by Patti Wigington please click on this link: Male Witches

Life in The Craft Newsletter Update

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Announcing Life in The Craft Newsletter

Lady Abyss and Lady Beltane have put their heads together to bring you a bi-monthly newsletter full of spells, rituals, ideas for the next upcoming Sabbat in both Hemispheres, recipes for magickal potions and herb mixtures. We’ll also include articles on The Craft and what is happening with it around the world plus some surprises along the way, like guest writers. We will try our best not to include anything in the newsletter that you could read on either or both of the websites.
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Celebrating Lammas

The year is 1100. The date is August 1. The monks in the abbey at Gloucester are celebrating the holy-day of St. Peter in Chains. One of the monks wakes from a strange dream in which God promises to strike down the wicked King who has abused the Holy Church. His superior, Abbot Serlo, on hearing of the dreams sends a warning to the King, William the Red, who has oppressed all of England with taxes and disgusted many with his licentiousness and blasphemy. Red, as he is called, receives the message the following day while preparing to indulge in one of his favorite sports, hunting, in the New Forest. Although there are no longer any people dwelling in the New Forest — they were all cleared out by Red’s father, William the Conqueror — there are rumors that it’s a hotbed of pagan activity. And August 2 is an important pagan holy-day. The Saxons call it Lammas, the Loaf-Mass. William the Red laughs at the warning from the monks and goes out hunting. A short time later, he is dead, struck in the chest by a stray arrow, and his brother, Henry, who was in the hunting party is riding hot-foot for Winchester and the crown.

Now some people say that William the Red was a Lammas sacrifice, …

Please continue reading by clicking this link: Celebrating Lammas