Celebrating 365 Days of Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for December 19, 20, 21 – Yule/Winter Solstice

 

December 19, 20, 21

Yule/Winter Solstice

The Solstice, taken from the Latin for “the Sun stands still,” is considered to be the true New Year-astronomically as well as spiritually. At this time, we see the simultaneous death and rebirth of the Sun-God, represented in the shortest day and longest night of the year. From this time forward, the sun grows in strength and power as the hours of daylight increase.

Midwinter, or Winter Solstice, marked the end of the first half of the Celtic year. As was Samhain, which has the Roman festival of Pomona and the Christian All Souls grafted on to it, the Celtic Winter Solstice was subsequently confused with the Roman Saturnalia, and later the Christian Christmas. Mythologically, logically, most of the Midwinter celebrations focused on the symbology of a new or younger God, overthrowing the older or father God, which would then bring forth a new and more potent life to the people and the land.

Although the Solstice takes place on December 21, Midwinter winter (renamed Yule by the Anglo Saxons) covers several weeks on either side of the Solstice. In medieval times, Yule began around St. Nicholas’s Day and ran until Candlemas. Eventually, Yule was redefined to mean either the Nativity (December 25) or the 12 days of celebration beginning on this date. The word Christmas then replaced Yule in most English-speaking speaking countries. However, the Danish preserved Yule as a way of maintaining their old style of festivities that incorporated rated several weeks of celebration.

In Wicca, and modern Paganism, the Winter Solstice is the time of new beginnings, a time to reflect on the past and project for the future. Magickally, the Winter Solstice affords us a perfect time to formulate a plan of action, a goal we can work towards during the coming year.

As the Oak King is Reborn…

From all of us at WOTC we wish you and your family the best of luck as the days get longer.

Grandma Got Run Over By A Broomstick

Grandma Got Run Over By A Broomstick

Author Unknown


Grandma got ran over by a broomstick
Walking home from our house Yule Eve.
Now you can say there’s no such thing as witch’s.
But as for me and grandpa, we believe.

She’d consumed too many spirits.
And we begged her not to go.
But she’d forgot her Belladonna,
So she sacheted out the door, we didn’t know.

When they found her the next morning
At the scene of the attack.
She had bristles on her forehead,
And incriminating brush marks on her back.

Grandma got ran over by a broomstick.
Walking home from our house Yule Eve..
You can say there’s no such thing as witch’s,
But as for me and grandpa, we believe.

Now we’re all so proud of grandpa.
He’s been taking it so well.
See him in there watching wrestling,
Drinking wine and dancing skyclad with cousin Nell.

It’s not Yule without grandma.
She’s the one with the big hat.
And we just can’t help but wonder,
Should we divvy up her Gifts, or simply send them back.

Grandma got ran over by a broomstick,
Walking home from our house Yule Eve..
You can say there’s no such thing as witch’s.
But as for me and grandpa, we believe.

Now the punch is on the table,
And the pumpkin, it’s so big.
And the black and silver candles
That would just have matched the hair in grandma’s wig.

I’ve warned all my friends and neighbors,
Better watch out for yourselves.
They should never give a license,
To a gal who flies a broomstick deosil.

Grandma got ran over by a broomstick,
Walking home from our house Yule Eve..
You can say there’s no such thing as witch’s,
But as for me and grandpa, we believe.

Some of the Witchcraft/Magickal Correspondence for Yule/Winter Solstice – Printable

The Magical History Of Yule, The Pagan Winter Solstice Celebration

On December 21 (or 22nd some years) we encounter the longest night of the year and the shortest day of the year. After that, the days grow longer until the Summer solstice. In various spiritual and pagan traditions, this seasonal cross-quarter is also known as Yule and is celebrated as a holiday.

In modern times, we typically celebrate Christmas, but long, long ago, Yule was celebrated by the Ancient Celts and various other Pagan religions. Perhaps one of the oldest winter celebrations in the entire world, ancient hunters and gatherers would mark their years based on the different seasons. And each seasonal cross-quarter, including the equinoxes and solstices, was thought to have spiritual significance.

According to Almanac.com, Yule comes from the old English word ‘Geol’ which is the equivalent of the old Norse word, jol. Both of which referred to the winter festivals that took place in celebration of the halfway point of winter.

Long before Christianity, the Ancient Celts and ancient British pagans would celebrate Yule, but when Christianity and…

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As The Holly King is Reborn…

From all of us at WOTC we wish you a blessed and happy Litha/Summer Solstice. May your days be brighter and full of positive energy!

Yule and Winter Solstice 2022: Meaning and Traditions For Yuletide

Yule and Winter Solstice is the most magical time of the year, and 2022 is no different! However, it can also be one of the most stressful. Remember to take a moment to notice the beauty around you during this yuletide season. Reflect on the current position of the Winter Solstice sun and feel its light shining down on you.

Nature is slowing down, and so should you. Be still and observe the peaceful silence and renewal taking place.

Engage all your senses, take deep breaths, and be truly present. Pause for a few moments to look at the beautiful sparkling lights, listen to your favorite winter song, smell the cold crisp air mixed with the scent of cinnamon or pine, taste your favorite warm drink, or snuggle up with a cozy blanket. Turn off electronics and be still.

Many Pagans, Witches, and those interested in Nature Spirituality celebrate the seasonal cycles. Sometimes referred to as the Wheel of the Year, and consisting of eight celebrations. Four of these festivals (ImbolcBeltaneLughnasadh, and Samhain) are rooted in Celtic history and origins.

The other four (Spring EquinoxSummer SolsticeAutumn Equinox, and Winter Solstice) represent the sun’s location. I created a complete guide to each season, including history, traditions, symbols, correspondences, ritual ideas, and how you can celebrate.

Please note that I make every effort to ensure this information is correct and accurate through my own experiences and referencing sources throughout AND at the bottom of this article.

Posts on this site may contain affiliate links that allow me to earn a small commission from your purchases (at no extra cost to you!)

From thepeculiarbrunette.com

For Your Viewing Pleasure – Summer Solstice vs. Winter Solstice: Side-by-Side Time-lapse 2017

Summer Solstice vs. Winter Solstice: Side-by-Side Time-lapse

Synchronized side-by-side time-lapse of the summer solstice and winter solstice from Manchester, UK, at the latitude of 53.5°N. Music: Discovery One Orbits Jupiter by TeknoAXE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGH5G…)  

© Scott Richards 2017 •

 

Difference Between the Winter and Summer Solstices?

To understand the difference between summer and winter solstices, we need to have a clear understanding of the word solstice. We know that earth revolves around sun in an elliptical orbit, but it also spins around its own axis. This is an imaginary line going right across the planet from North Pole to South Pole. Fortunately for our planet, this axis is not perpendicular but tilted about 23.5 degrees and it is this tilt that gives us seasons on earth. This tilt makes one half of earth receive more direct rays from sun than the other half which remains away from earth.

The axis, when it tilts towards the sun, it makes northern hemisphere receive more direct rays from the sun than southern hemisphere. This phenomenon occurs between June and September and thus this is the period when it is summer season in the northern hemisphere. Again, this axis tilts away from the sun between December and March which is why we have winter season in the northern hemisphere during this period. While it is summers in northern hemisphere as it receives more direct rays from the sun, it is winter in the southern hemisphere, and vice versa in winters.

To read the rest of this article from differencebetween.com

Summer Solstice: The Meaning and History Behind the First Day of Summer

The summer solstice sets off the official start of summer as the Northern Hemisphere angles itself at the point in its orbit closest to the sun, causing the longest day and shortest night of the calendar year.

Many cultures, both ancient and modern, celebrate the sunlight with rituals and holidays.

What is the summer solstice?

The term solstice comes from the Latin words “sol” (sun) and “stitium” (still or stopped). It is used to describe the exact moment when the poles are tilted at their maximum toward or away from the sun.

The summer solstice occurs when the sun is directly above the Tropic of Cancer, which is the circle marking the latitude 23.5 degrees north, and which runs through …

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13 Fascinating Winter Solstice Traditions Around the World

Winter solstice traditions from around the globe

Just when you think December has enough to celebrate between ChristmasHanukkahKwanzaa, and the impending New Year, there’s yet another reason to gather with your loved ones and celebrate: the winter solstice. You might be more familiar with the winter solstice as the day with the shortest amount of sunlight. But around the world, many cultures still celebrate the longest night of the year with unique winter solstice traditions. Read on to find out what they are. Then learn when the winter solstice is this year and what the 2021 winter solstice means for your zodiac.

Winter solstice traditions: Saint Lucia Day, Scandinavia

As with many modern celebrations, ancient festivals observing the winter solstice merged with newer traditions to create the holiday season as we know it today. In Scandinavia…

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The Holly King and The Oak King

The legend of the Holly King and the Oak King is oft referred to as we approach Yule and start decking the halls with boughs of holly, but what is it all about and where does the story come from?

There are two main versions of the story, each with slightly different characters. In one, the Oak King is a figure similar to the Green Man; a summer God of warm smiles and broad green leaves, while the Holly King is a similarly benign and jolly chap dressed in red and with holly tangled in his long white beard (sound familiar?), associated with winter. He even rides a sleigh pulled by deer. This version has its roots in Wiccan belief, and tells of two battling kings; the Holly King reigns the waning year and is defeated at the Winter Solstice by the Oak King, who then reigns the waxing year in turn until he is defeated at the Summer Solstice by the Holly King, and so on ad infinitum.

The second version of the story has older roots in European witchcraft traditions, and as with so much goes back …

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A Yule Drink and Litha Cake Combined Them for Brunch Solstice Feast – Flashback to 2012

I know I have been doing separate posts for Yule and Litha things but when I came across these two recipes, in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2012, one for each season of the year the two hemispheres are going into, they sounded yummy to me to have together. I apologize in advance for not calculating from American measurements to other parts of Mother Earth. I just found this website https://www.europeancuisines.com/ while it says European Cuisines it covers other countries as well.

(SIDE NOTE if you do not have a Sun shaped disc to pour the batter in use cookie cutters for whatever shapes remind you of the Sun or use a knife to cut out a shape. Even a young children could use cookie cutters with the child’s caregivers supervising. Than either eat the scraps from the cut outs or put them outside for the wildlife in your area to celebrate the Solstice with your family. This is a good day to have breakfast for dinner/supper/tea or use for part of your feast after your families Solstice ritual)

Sun God Supreme

1 cup flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 Tablespoons of melted butter or oil

1 egg

3/4 cup yogurt

Garnish with 3 cups cubed fruit, all colors

Sift dry ingredients together. Then separately whisk wet ingredients together. Combined wet and dry ingredients, mixing for no more then 20 strokes, one for each day in June (or December) until the Solstice. Let mixture sit for 10 minutes     while you prepare the fruit, set the table, and heat the frying pan lightly coated with oil or butter on a medium heat.

(SIDE NOTE Depending on the ages of the people attending your celebration feast designated cutting the fruit, setting and clearing the table, and doing dishes along with wiping the table and kitchen surfaces. If you allow a child of 3 to cut up their pancake with a plastic knife this can also be used to slice bananas or other soft fruit. This is a family celebration so let the family help with the work and as your homes’ Priestess you can relax and enjoy the feast and time together with a lot less stress) 

Pour batter into sun-shaped discs (or pour batter from a measuring cup with a lip to get lovely round pancakes.) cook until bubbles that have formed in the batter burst and make little dry craters. Flip one and briefly cook the other side. Serve on brighly colored plates surrounded by fruit of all colors, which represent the abundant growth and glory of the Earth Goddess. Drizzle with honey or maple syrup and enjoy.

Pancakes combine the traditional foods of Litha — butter, milk, cakes, and honey — represent the Sun God at the height of his reign.

Copyright Dallas Jennifer Cobb page 77

Magical Mulled Cider

(SIDE NOTE This cider contains no alcohol so the whole family can enjoy it. If you want to spike it for the adults I have used dark rum measured to taste of the person drinking it. It is also good cooled to room temperature but I did not like the taste will chilled in the refrigerator)

1 quart (or 1 liter) apple cider

6 orange, sliced to look like the sun

12 whole cloves

1/8 teaspoon of nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

6 cinnamon sticks

Honey to taste

Toast the return of the Sun God, and the holy rebirth, with this warming drink when you gather with friends and family on the longest night of the year, Best made over an open fire, but easily concocted on a stove indoors will warm the hearth, heart, and home. Sip this and know anything is possible.

In a large pot combine apple cider which represents the Sun God, cloves, nutmeg, and ground cinnamon. Simmer for at least half an hour to make your house smell wonderfully festive, or longer for a stronger mulled taste. This simmering symbolically brings the God and Goddess together. and adds a little “spice” to the mix. Pour into a mug, carefully an orange slice into each cup. Add cinnamon stick and serve. Makes 6 servings.

Copyright by Dallas Jennifer Cobb page 129

 

Flashback 2005 – Litha

The Summer Solstice, the zenith of the sun, is an excellent time to do spells for abundance and prosperity. Take three green candles and three gold or bright yellow candles and put them in gold-colored or brass candlesticks. Arrange them in a circle on your altar or on a table, alternating colors. In the center of the candles, arrange money and symbols of money. Coins are good, for example, and dollar coins work especially well because they are gold colored. You might also put pictures or drawings of what form you want your abundance to take, like a new car, a bill paid, or stocks and bonds and other symbols of wealth and security.

cast a circle as you usually would. Then chant, “Sun so high, bring me your bounty, warmth, and prosperity, bring me success. Bring me the means to fulfill my desires, enough and some to share.” Repeat this chant and imagine the pile of coins on the altar growing, and the pictures and symbols becoming real. Hold the thought as long as you can, and as soon as your attention begins to waver, say, “So mote it be,” and quickly blow out all the candles. End your circle in the usual manner.

Magenta Griffith in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2005 Page 79

Flashback 2005 – Yule

Gather with friends at sunrise, or as soon after as possible, on the Winter Solstice. Meditate on the idea that this is the darkest time of year, but that light will return. As it is the circle of the year, so may it be in the world: that as the light grows, illumination and warmth extend through-out the globe. Concentrate on the idea of peace, understanding, and harmony between all peoples spreading as the light of the Sun spreads. Resolve to be a more peaceful person in the coming year and think of ways you could promote understanding. Feel in your heart of hearts that peace is not only possible be inevitable, that the time of war is over, that the human race is evolving past such foolish pursuits. Then sign a song of peace, like “Imagine” or “Give Peace a Chance” by John Lennon; “Universal Solider” by Donovan; or “Last Night I Had the Strangest Dream” which has been recorded by Joan Baez, the Weavers, Pete Seeger, among others. If you are alone and don’t wish to sing, play a peaceful selection of music – either folk songs or music like Pachebel’s Cannon or Dubussy’s La Mer –while concentrating on the same idea.

By Magenta Griffith in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2005 Page