Happy Litha Blessings

Litha/Summer Solstice Correspondences

From FlyingTheHedge.com – Litha Correspondences

Symbolism: life, fire, rebirth, transformation, power, purity

Symbols: sun flowers, leaves, sword, spear, sun, God’s eye, sun wheels, bonfire, balefires, fire, sun dials, bird feathers, seashells,

Colors: red, gold, orange, yellow, white, green, blue

Food and Drink: mead, ale, summer fruits and vegetables, strawberries, honey cakes, whipped cream, oranges, lemons, summer squash, honey

Herbs: Saint John’s Wortlavenderrose, peony, vervain, mugwortchamomile, chickweed, chicory, sun flower, lily, thyme, hemp, fennel, nettle, wisteria, rue, fern, heather, oakyarrowholly

Deities: Ra, Bast, Helios, Oak King, Fotuna, Arinna, and other sun god.

Crystals and Gemstones: Lapis, diamond, tiger’s eye, emerald, jade, and other green stones

Animals: butterflies, wren, horse, stag, robin, cattle, phoenix, dragon, faeries, satyrs

Magic: Litha is the time to celebrate the Sun and all that he provides for us. Protection spells and fire magic are great to perform on this night. Make protective amulets to be empowered in the balefire lit on Midsummer’s eve. Looking to promote a transformation, a new career, or create a new or strengthen an old relationship? Litha is a great night to perform such magic. Collect herbs, especially St. John’s Wort, on the eve of this sabbat to bring luck and enhance the herbs’ power. Renew your wedding vows or just enjoy the time with your friends and family. This is also a great time to communicate with faeries and seek their help if you so wish. Be careful though. Faeries can be tricky.

Please note this is not a complete list but a brief overview of symbols, colors, herbs, deities, and the like. If I have missed something that you feel should make the list, please feel free to contact me via the comments or through email. Willow

Celebrating Litha, the Summer Solstice The Midsummer Sabbat: Celebrate the Power of the Sun!

The gardens are blooming, and summer is in full swing. Fire up the barbeque, turn on the sprinkler, and enjoy the celebrations of Midsummer! Also called Litha, this summer solstice Sabbat honors the longest day of the year. Take advantage of the extra hours of daylight and spend as much time as you can outdoors!

Depending on your individual spiritual path, there are many different ways you can celebrate Litha, but the focus is nearly always on celebrating the power of the sun. It’s the time of year when the crops are growing heartily and the earth has warmed up. We can spend long sunny afternoons enjoying the outdoors, and getting back to nature under the long daylight hours.

Hold a Midsummer Night’s Fire Ritual, and celebrate the season with a big bonfire. Prefer to spend some time alone at the summer solstice? Not a problem! Add these simple Litha prayers into your summer solstice rituals this year.

Are you headed to the beach this summer? Take advantage of all of the magic it has to offer, with Seven Ways to Use Beach Magic. If you have little Pagans in your family, you can get them involved in the festivities too, with these 5 Fun Ways to Celebrate Litha with Kids. Finally, if you’re not sure how to get started celebrating Litha, try these Ten Great Ways to Celebrate Litha.

Traditions, Folklore and Customs

Interested in learning about some of the history behind Litha? Here’s some background on Midsummer celebrations—learn who the gods and goddesses of summer are, how they’ve been honored throughout the centuries, and about the magic of stone circles! Let’s start with a quick look at the history behind the celebrations of the summer solstice, as well as some of the customs and traditions of Litha.

There’s a ton of solar magic and myths and legends out there, and many cultures have worshiped the sun as part of religious practice throughout time. In Native American spirituality, the Sun Dance is an important part of ritual.

The summer solstice is also associated with festivals such as the Vestalia, in ancient Rome, and with ancient structures like the stone circles found all over the world.

Handfasting Season is Here

June is a traditional time for weddings, but if you’re Pagan or Wiccan, a Handfasting ceremony may be more appropriate. Find out the origins of this custom, how you can have a fantastic ceremony, selecting a cake, and some great ideas on gifts for your guests!

In a historical context, handfasting is an old tradition that has seen a resurgence in popularity lately. There are plenty of ways to have a magical ceremony that celebrates your spirituality as part of your special day. You may even want to invite some of the deities of love and marriage to be part of your ceremony!

If you’re not sure about how to have a handfasting, make sure you’ve got someone who is legally able to perform it, especially if you’re looking for a state-licensed marriage. You can use a basic handfasting ceremony template as a structure for your ceremony, and you might want to consider a Pagan-friendly custom like broom-jumping as part of your celebration.

Don’t forget, you’ll need a cake! Keep a few simple tips in mind when you’re selecting your handfasting cake.

Crafts and Creations

As Litha approaches, you can decorate your home (and keep your kids entertained) with a number of easy craft projects

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Happy Yule Blessings

Spell for Today – A Midsummer Night’s Fire Ritual

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A Midsummer Night’s Fire Ritual

The Summer Solstice, known to some as Litha, Midsummer, or Alban Heruin, is the longest day of the year. It’s the time when the sun is most powerful, and new life has begun to grow within the earth. After today, the nights will once more begin to grow longer, and the sun will move further away in the sky.

If your tradition requires you to cast a circle, consecrate a space, or call the quarters, now is the time to do so.

This ritual is a great one to perform outside, so if you have the opportunity to do this without scaring the neighbors, take advantage of it.
Begin this ritual by preparing the wood for a fire, without lighting it yet. While the ideal situation would have you setting a huge bonfire alight, realistically not everyone can do that. If you’re limited, use a table top brazier or fire-safe pot, and light your fire there instead.
Say either to yourself or out loud:

Today, to celebrate Midsummer, I honor the Earth itself. I am surrounded by tall trees. There is a clear sky above me and cool dirt beneath me, and I am connected to all three. I light this fire as the Ancients did so long ago.

At this point, start your fire. Say:

The Wheel of the Year has turned once more
The light has grown for six long months
Until today.
Today is Litha, called Alban Heruin by my ancestors.
A time for celebration.
Tomorrow the light will begin to fade

As the Wheel of the Year
Turns on and ever on.
Turn to the East, and say:
From the east comes the wind,
Cool and clear.
It brings new seeds to the garden
Bees to the pollen
And birds to the trees.
Turn to Face South, and say:
The sun rises high in the summer sky
And lights our way even into the night
Today the sun casts three rays
The light of fire upon the land, the sea, and the heavens
Turn to face West, saying:
From the west, the mist rolls in
Bringing rain and fog
The life-giving water without which
We would cease to be.
Finally, turn to the North, and say:
Beneath my feet is the Earth,
Soil dark and fertile
The womb in which life begins
And will later die, then return anew.

Build up the fire even more, so that you have a good strong blaze going.

If you wish to make an offering to the gods, now is the time to do it. For this sample, we’re including the use of a triple goddess in the invocation, but this is where you should substitute the names of the deities of your personal tradition.

Say:

Alban Heruin is a time of rededication
To the gods. The triple goddess watches over me.
She is known by many names.
She is the Morrighan, Brighid, and Cerridwen.
She is the washer at the ford,
She is the guardian of the hearth,
She is the one who stirs the cauldron of inspiration.
I give honor to You, O mighty ones,
By all your names, known and unknown.
Bless me with Your wisdom
And give life and abundance to me
As the sun gives life and abundance to the Earth.
I make this offering to you
To show my allegiance
To show my honor
To show my dedication
To You.

Cast your offering into fire. Conclude the ritual by saying:

Today, at Litha, I celebrate the life
And love of the gods
And of the Earth and Sun.

Take a few moments to reflect upon what you have offered, and what the gifts of the gods mean to you. When you are ready, if you have cast a circle, dismantle it or dismiss the quarters at this time. Allow your fire to go out on its own.

by Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

Summer Solstice: The Meaning and History Behind the First Day of Summer

The summer solstice sets off the official start of summer as the Northern Hemisphere angles itself at the point in its orbit closest to the sun, causing the longest day and shortest night of the calendar year.

Many cultures, both ancient and modern, celebrate the sunlight with rituals and holidays.

What is the summer solstice?

The term solstice comes from the Latin words “sol” (sun) and “stitium” (still or stopped). It is used to describe the exact moment when the poles are tilted at their maximum toward or away from the sun.

The summer solstice occurs when the sun is directly above the Tropic of Cancer, which is the circle marking the latitude 23.5 degrees north, and which runs through …

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Life in The Craft Going to an 8 Time Per Year Magazine Coming Straight toYour Emails Inbox for Free

 
I have started witchcraft magazine that comes as a PDF email to send to anyone who would like information about different topics highlighting the Sabbats that will be covered a little more in depth than it would be in a regular post on the WOTC website. All articles in this magazine will not be posted on the WOTC website. The magazine will be emailed to you a week before each of the 8 Sabbats corresponding with the Wheel of The Year starting with Lammas in the northern hemisphere and Imbolc in the southern hemisphere.
 
The topics are going to include are but not limited to:

More in-depth knowledge of tarot and/or oracle cards and/or other types of readings such as an Animal Spirit reading. Each issue will have one type of a general reading for that month. Each issue will focus on 1 major and minor tarot card number. 

Any gatherings that will be held during the month. For example, an Esbat or a Sabbat and/or an open chat.

Recipes regular and herbal. Spells. Longer Solitary rituals. I would enjoy having people submit their recipes, spells, and rituals to be included along with the name you would like to use so I can give you credit for your submission.

More topics that might be covered in an issue Goddesses, Gods, Meditation, Pagan/Witch Arts and Crafts, things for Children, a couple of fiction and/or non-fiction book lists with a short summary plus whatever else I and/or you think others may find interesting for that month

Each issue will cover topics that pertain to the specific Sabbats of the issue I will be emailing.  It will come in a PDF format so you can print it out the whole issue or just print whatever pages you find helpful and like. 

If I use things from a book or an internet website Dandelion cannot make any editing changes to it due to copyright laws.

Hopefully you are now asking yourself “How do I sign up to get this witchy/pagan magazine?” To start receiving this once-a-month magazine that began with the first issue that came out on January 30,2022 just email me at ladybeltane@aol.com, please put the email address you would like it sent to in the body of the email and Magazine in the subject line, so I make sure it gets to you. No one else will see your email address because I will be putting them in the BCC address line to make sure your personal information stays private. Also, email me anytime to tell me what topics you would like me to try to cover in a future issue, feedback on any issue and anything you would like to submit to be considered to have published in an issue. To ensure you get your copy please send your email address to me once by the 10th of any month. I will not be adding anyone to the emailing list after this date! If you asked for any of the issues through June’s, there is no need to ask for any of the other issues as you are already on the email list for Life in The Craft magazine. I will not be posting after sending out each issue anymore. Donations for the subscription is not necessary but are always very much appreciated.

If at any time you want to unsubscribe just email me and ask to be taken off the list and if you would not mind telling me the reason why you longer want to receive the minor magazine any longer, I would greatly appreciate it. Knowing the reason, you no longer wish to subscribe can help to improve the magazine. 

As I am the only person posting on WOTC, writing the magazine, replying to emails and running WOTC’s School of Witchcraft among other things I usually spend over 40 hours a week to bring you what I hope is interesting information to you. I have found I cannot do a monthly magazine and have the contents in it that I want to bring to you that is why I am cutting it down to being published only eight times a year. Plus, I want to keep the magazine free at least to end the of 2022 than I will rethink if I will charge for it or not.

I now have an Editor who is volunteering her time to fix my mistakes. Please help me thank Dandelion for her time and hard work in bring a more professional looking magazine to you. A huge thank you from me to Dandelion for volunteering to fix my mistakes which can take some time and for all the other editing you have done for me. 

Let’s Have Som e Fun – 10 Winter Crafts for Wiccans

With the cold weather bringing everyone indoors, and the upcoming Yule holiday, making crafts and gifts indoors is a cozy, soul-nourishing activity.

Here’s some ideas for creating with the heart and spirit in mind.

For fall project ideas, check out this article, 11 Fall Projects for the Crafty Witch.

For spring project ideas, take a look at 10 Spring Projects for Wiccans.

1.  Quilting.  We hear an awful lot about “focus” in the context of spell work.  Sewing makes for a powerful way to draw your intentions into sharp concentration.  Try hand sewing a quilted sachet using a steady chant with every stitch to bring the mind into a lovely, trance like state of calm.

2.  Candle making.  Nothing warms the heart and soul like burning fresh, homemade candles.  Pick a purpose.  Then toss in herbs, anchor the wick with a special gemstone, rub it with oil and/or carve whatever you want into them.

3.  Create an incense blend.  Every witch should learn the art of blending herbs into pleasing, aromatic scents.  Winter makes the perfect season for experimenting with dried herbs (preferably from your own fall garden harvest!).  Test your blend by tossing a handful into your burning fireplace to warm and bless the home.

4.  Make your own rune set.  With the natural light in retreat and the long nighttime hours, divination makes for a lovely indoor evening activity.  Make your own rune set—-and be creative!  Carve the runes into polymer clay, wood or paint small stones.  Makes a charming gift for a like-minded friend.

5.  Crock pot something.  A crock pot makes a perfect cauldron in the winter months.  Stew something kitchen-witch style or …

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Let’s Have Some Fun – 9 Summer Solstice Crafts & Recipes for a Magical Litha

This month, we compiled a list of our all-time favorite Summer Solstice crafts and recipes.

With the kids out of school and the days getting longer, escape the heat with these lazy-afternoon projects.

Foraged Fairy Ladder/Trellis

It’s the season of fairies, and nothing delights the inner child more than playing with the woodland spirits.

This one is so easy, it’s almost self-explanatory.

Literally:  Glue some sticks together.  Yup.  That’s it.  I used hot glue for the one above.

If you want to get fancy, add little bits of (affiliate link —–>) sheet moss to get that aged-in-the-garden feel.

You can even train roses or herbs to grow on it.

Honey Cakes …

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A Very Happy and Blessed Beltane To All

A Very Happy and Blessed Samhain to All

Samhain Correspondences – Printable

Printable Beltane Correspondences

Fertility Deities of Beltane

I feel t is important to remember Lady Abyss as we count down the days until Beltane so I decided to repost an article by her from 2017.

Fertility Deities of Beltane

 

Beltane is a time of great fertility — for the earth itself, for animals, and of course for people as well. This season has been celebrated by cultures going back thousands of years, in a variety of ways, but nearly all shared the fertility aspect. Typically, this is a Sabbat to celebrate gods of the hunt or of the forest, and goddesses of passion and motherhood, as well as agricultural deities. Here are a list of gods and goddesses that can be honored as part of your tradition’s Beltane rituals.

 

Artemis (Greek): The moon goddess Artemis was associated with the hunt and was seen as a goddess of forests and hillsides. This pastoral connection made her a part of spring celebrations in later periods.

 

Bes (Egyptian): Worshiped in later dynasties, Bes was a household protection god, and watched over mothers and young children. He and his wife, Beset, were paired up in rituals to cure problems with infertility.

 

Bacchus (Roman): Considered the equivalent of Greek god Dionysus, Bacchus was the party god — grapes, wine, and general debauchery were his domain. In March each year, Roman women could attend secret ceremonies called the bacchanalia, and he is associated with sexual free-for-alls and fertility.

 

Cernunnos (Celtic): Cernunnos is a horned god found in Celtic mythology. He is connected with male animals, particularly the stag in rut, and this has led him to be associated with fertility and vegetation. Depictions of Cernunnos are found in many parts of the British Isles and western Europe. He is often portrayed with a beard and wild, shaggy hair — he is, after all, the lord of the forest.

 

Flora (Roman): This goddess of spring and flowers had her own festival, Floralia, which was celebrated every year between April 28 to May 3. Romans dressed in bright robes and floral wreaths, and attended theater performances and outdoor shows. Offerings of milk and honey were made to the goddess.

 

Hera (Greek): This goddess of marriage was the equivalent of the Roman Juno, and took it upon herself to bestow good tidings to new brides. A maiden about to marry could make offerings to Hera, in the hopes that she would bless the marriage with fertility. In her earliest forms, she appears to have been a nature goddess, who presides over wildlife and nurses the young animals which she holds in her arms.

 

Kokopelli (Hopi): This flute-playing, dancing spring god carries unborn children upon his own back, and then passes them out to fertile women. In the Hopi culture, he is part of rites that relate to marriage and childbearing, as well as the reproductive abilities of animals. Often portrayed with rams and stags, symbolic of his fertility, Kokopelli occasionally is seen with his consort, Kokopelmana.

 

Pan (Greek): This agricultural god watched over shepherds and their flocks. He was a rustic sort of god, spending lots of time roaming the woods and pastures, hunting and playing music on his flute. Pan is typically portrayed as having the hindquarters and horns of a goat, similar to a faun. Because of his connection to fields and the forest, he is often honored as a spring fertility god.

 

Priapus (Greek): This fairly minor rural god has one giant claim to fame — his permanently erect and enormous phallus. The son of Aphrodite by Dionysus (or possibly Zeus, depending on the source), Priapus was mostly worshiped in homes rather than in an organized cult. Despite his constant lust, most stories portray him as sexually frustrated, or even impotent. However, in agricultural areas he was still regarded as a god of fertility, and at one point he was considered a protective god, who threatened sexual violence against anyone — male or female — who transgressed the boundaries he guarded.

 

Sheela-na-Gig (Celtic): Although the Sheela-na-Gig is technically the name applied to the carvings of women with exaggerated vulvae that have been found in Ireland and England, there’s a theory that the carvings are representative of a lost pre-Christian goddess. Typically, the Sheela-na-Gig adorns buildings in areas of Ireland that were part of the Anglo-Norman conquests in the 12th century. She is shown as a homely woman with a giant yoni, which is spread wide to accept the seed of the male. Folkloric evidence indicates that the figures are theory that the figures were part of a fertility rite, similar to “birthing stones”, which were used to bring on conception.

Xochiquetzal (Aztec): This fertility goddess was associated with spring, and represented not only flowers but the fruits of life and abundance. She was also the patron goddess of prostitutes and craftsmen.

by Patti Wigington
Published on ThoughtCo

 

For Your Viewing Pleasure – Beltane

Edinburgh’s Beltane Fire Festival celebrates the rebirth of summer with fire, dance and drumming c. 2017

Celtic festival of Beltane heats up in Scotland c. 2018