Preparing for Ostara/Spring Equinox Coven Gathering Ritual

Merry meet and merry greet. The coven gathering is open to any witch who would like to attend. It is being held on Saturday, MArch 19, 2016 at 7:00 PM CT. For more information go to the Home page on Covenlife.co and scroll down to the announcement for this gathering.

Ostara is the start of spring when day and night are in perfect balance. It is the time when the Triple Goddess starts out as a Maiden and conceives her child. The eggs represent this quickening of the womb. The Ying/Yang symbol represents the male and female energy all living things have inside of them.It is a time to plant your seeds to nurture them into seedlings to plant on or around Beltane when the Triple Goddess enters the Mother aspect.

Below are the things that should be prepared ahead of time for our ritual. I suggest not making the eggs more than 2 days in advance because we will be eating them during the ritual.

Items Needed:

1 White Candle (any size is fine) Represents Ostara

1 Green Candle (same size as white one) Represents Oak King

Lighter or Matches

Water Proof Markers in 2 colors – 1 Light and 1 Darker

2 Previously Hard Boiled and Colored Eggs – 1 Colored the Darker Shade

                                                                                   1 Colored the Lighter Shade

Something to put the egg shells in when you eat them

Pair of Pointy Scissors to cut circles out of Ying/Yang Symbol

1-8×11 Inch Piece of Plain White Paper – With Ying/Yang Symbol Drawn on it.  I suggest using a dessert plate to draw the circle on the paper and then cutting around the outside of the mark.

Holes cut out to fit 1 egg in large part of each side of the symbol. I suggest using a shot glass or something the same size to draw th circles,  then cut inside the lines. Keep circles you cut out. One should be colored the lighter color and the other the darker one (you will be taping them back into the Ying/Yang symbol.

When coloring the eggs and Ying/Yang symbol use the lighter shade on one side and 1 egg. Then use darker side to do other side of symbol and egg.

Black Sharpie or similar Marker to write on the eggs with.

Before the ritual the eggs should be colored, the Ying/Yang symbol drawn and colored. Cut the circles out of each side of the symbol to nestle the eggs in. The reason for putting the opposite color egg into the symbols is to show how if it is the masculine side they have some feminine qualities and vise versa. 

Below will be a drawing of what each step in making the symbol and eggs will look like. My drawing with the Paint program on my computer is not that good but at least it will give you an idea of what I am talking about above.

Ying Yang Drawing

Mark each egg with as many runes as needed to convey your wishes/goals for yourself to sprout and grow thought out the summer and to be harvested in the fall. Below is a list of  one type of runes and their common meanings. You can find other types of runes by doing a search on Google.com or Bing.com

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ITEMS NEEDED FOR RITUAL:

First should have all ritual items as close to your computer as possible, so you can follow along with ritual easily.

Prepared Ying/Yang Symbol

2 Prepared Hard Bile Eggs

1-3 inch Black Candle

1-3 inch Yellow Candle

Plate or something to put egg shells on

Something to save egg shells in -you will be “planting” these either in your garden outside or in a pot inside with some type of seeds (flower or leafy plant or a vegetable- whatever kind of seed is your choice) You can refrigerate or freeze egg shells until you are ready to plant them on Beltane.The egg shells will help nourish what ever seeds or plant you chose to use them with.

Any questions about this post? Please email Lady Beltane at ladybeltane@aol.com

The actual ritual will be posted one week before our gathering in the post that has the date, time and place. Just scroll down this page to find it.

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The Witches Correspondences for Friday, December 25th

Christmas with animals ::: Weihnachten mit Tieren
FRIDAY CORRESPONDENCES

Venus/Water/East/West/South/Dawn/Female/Libra/Taurus

 

Magickal Intentions: Love, Romance, Marriage, Sexual Matters, Physical Beauty, Friendship and Partnerships, Strangers, Heart

Color: aqua, blue, light blue, brown, green, pale green, magenta, peach, pink, rose, white, all pastels

Number: 5, 6

Metal: copper

Charm: green or white garments, scepter

Stone: alexandrite, amethyst, coral, diamond, emerald, jade, jet, black moonstone, peridot, smoky quartz, tiger’s-eye, pink tourmaline

Animal: camel, dove, elephant, goat, horse, pigeon, sparrow

Plant: apple, birch, cherry, clematis, clove, coriander, heather, hemlock, hibiscus, ivy, lotus, moss, myrtle, oats, pepperwort, peppermint, pinecone, quince, raspberry, rose, pink rose, red rose, rose hips, saffron, sage, savin, stephanotis, strawberry, thyme, vanilla, verbena, violet, water lily, yarrow, and all flowers

Incense: ambergris, camphor, mace, musk, myrrh, rose, saffron, sage, sandalwood, sweetgrass, vanilla, violet, all floral scents

Goddess: Aphrodite, Asherah, Baalith, Brigid, Erzulie, Freya (Passionate Queen), Frigg, Gefion, Harbor (Beautiful One), Hestia, Inanna, Ishtar (Lady of Passion and Desire), Lakshmi, Lilith, Mokosh, Nehalennia, Nerthus, Ostara, Pombagira, Sarasvati, Shakti, Shekinah, Sirtur, Al Uzza, Venus (Queen of Pleasure), Vesta

God: Allah, Bacchus, Bes, Cupid, the Dagda, Dionysus, El, Eros (God of Love), Freyr, Frit Ailek, Shukra

Evocation: Agrat Bat Mahalat, Anael, Hagiel, Mokosba, Rasbid, Sachiel, Uriel, Velas

Courtesy of Moonlight Musings

The Witches Correspondences for Friday, November 20th

celtic musician

FRIDAY CORRESPONDENCES

Venus/Water/East/West/South/Dawn/Female/Libra/Taurus

 

Magickal Intentions: Love, Romance, Marriage, Sexual Matters, Physical Beauty, Friendship and Partnerships, Strangers, Heart

Color: aqua, blue, light blue, brown, green, pale green, magenta, peach, pink, rose, white, all pastels

Number: 5, 6

Metal: copper

Charm: green or white garments, scepter

Stone: alexandrite, amethyst, coral, diamond, emerald, jade, jet, black moonstone, peridot, smoky quartz, tiger’s-eye, pink tourmaline

Animal: camel, dove, elephant, goat, horse, pigeon, sparrow

Plant: apple, birch, cherry, clematis, clove, coriander, heather, hemlock, hibiscus, ivy, lotus, moss, myrtle, oats, pepperwort, peppermint, pinecone, quince, raspberry, rose, pink rose, red rose, rose hips, saffron, sage, savin, stephanotis, strawberry, thyme, vanilla, verbena, violet, water lily, yarrow, and all flowers

Incense: ambergris, camphor, mace, musk, myrrh, rose, saffron, sage, sandalwood, sweetgrass, vanilla, violet, all floral scents

Goddess: Aphrodite, Asherah, Baalith, Brigid, Erzulie, Freya (Passionate Queen), Frigg, Gefion, Harbor (Beautiful One), Hestia, Inanna, Ishtar (Lady of Passion and Desire), Lakshmi, Lilith, Mokosh, Nehalennia, Nerthus, Ostara, Pombagira, Sarasvati, Shakti, Shekinah, Sirtur, Al Uzza, Venus (Queen of Pleasure), Vesta

God: Allah, Bacchus, Bes, Cupid, the Dagda, Dionysus, El, Eros (God of Love), Freyr, Frit Ailek, Shukra

Evocation: Agrat Bat Mahalat, Anael, Hagiel, Mokosba, Rasbid, Sachiel, Uriel, Velas

 

Courtesy of Moonlight Musings

 

The Witches Correspondences for Friday, November 6th

The Witching Hour

Friday Correspondences

Venus/Water/East/West/South/Dawn/Female/Libra/Taurus

 

Magickal Intentions: Love, Romance, Marriage, Sexual Matters, Physical Beauty, Friendship and Partnerships, Strangers, Heart

Color: aqua, blue, light blue, brown, green, pale green, magenta, peach, pink, rose, white, all pastels

Number: 5, 6

Metal: copper

Charm: green or white garments, scepter

Stone: alexandrite, amethyst, coral, diamond, emerald, jade, jet, black moonstone, peridot, smoky quartz, tiger’s-eye, pink tourmaline

Animal: camel, dove, elephant, goat, horse, pigeon, sparrow

Plant: apple, birch, cherry, clematis, clove, coriander, heather, hemlock, hibiscus, ivy, lotus, moss, myrtle, oats, pepperwort, peppermint, pinecone, quince, raspberry, rose, pink rose, red rose, rose hips, saffron, sage, savin, stephanotis, strawberry, thyme, vanilla, verbena, violet, water lily, yarrow, and all flowers

Incense: ambergris, camphor, mace, musk, myrrh, rose, saffron, sage, sandalwood, sweetgrass, vanilla, violet, all floral scents

Goddess: Aphrodite, Asherah, Baalith, Brigid, Erzulie, Freya (Passionate Queen), Frigg, Gefion, Harbor (Beautiful One), Hestia, Inanna, Ishtar (Lady of Passion and Desire), Lakshmi, Lilith, Mokosh, Nehalennia, Nerthus, Ostara, Pombagira, Sarasvati, Shakti, Shekinah, Sirtur, Al Uzza, Venus (Queen of Pleasure), Vesta

God: Allah, Bacchus, Bes, Cupid, the Dagda, Dionysus, El, Eros (God of Love), Freyr, Frit Ailek, Shukra

Evocation: Agrat Bat Mahalat, Anael, Hagiel, Mokosba, Rasbid, Sachiel, Uriel, Velas

 

Courtesy of Moonlight Musings

Ostara Creation Spell

Ostara Creation Spell

This joyous holiday honors the spring goddess, Ostara, whose name means “movement toward the rising Sun.” Just as Imbolc signals the return of light, Ostara signals the awakening of the Earth. Trees are blooming, bulbs are pushing up out of the ground, birds are nesting, and animals are mating. The creative energy is at its strongest during this season. If you haven’t decided what you wish to manifest this year, do so now.

To empower your goal, write it on a hard-boiled egg with a wax crayon. The egg is a powerful symbol representing the universe in embryo. Your goal lives within you in the same way that creation lives within its egg, and like the egg, your goal has everything it needs to manifest. Now, draw two interlocking triangles to form a six-pointed star on your egg. This star symbolizes one of the most important keys in magic: as above, so below. What you can create in your imagination, you can manifest on the physical plane. Dye your egg a deep red to symbolize the goddess and life itself. Using your egg as a focus, work in the days ahead with the interplay of imagination and physical striving to achieve your desire.

By: Lily Gardner

8 Ideas for Celebrating Ostara


Ostara Comments

8 Ideas for Celebrating Ostara

 

Ostara, the Spring Equinox, is always especially beautiful here in Sonoma County, California. This year seems especially nice. Winter’s rains have been lighter than we would like, but they have been gentle and well timed. My farmer friends with whom I’ve spoken are feeling good. Warming temperatures and longer days have brought forth the first abundant flowers, especially the wild mustard that makes it seem as if our craggy valley oaks and vineyards have their feet awash in bright yellow paint. The threats from frost are virtually over.

Our season and Ostara’s symbolism are in perfect harmony.

Wiccan Sabbats celebrate our Wheel of the Year, and the Wheel of the Year, like the phases of the moon, symbolize to us the stages of life, from birth to death to rebirth. Four Sabbats are “Greater Sabbats” originally linked with Celtic agricultural cycles: Brigit, Beltane, Lammas, and Samhain. The other four “cross quarter” Sabbats are correlated with the cycles of the solar year, the solstices and equinoxes. On the 21st of this month, Witches and many other Pagans will celebrate Ostara, the Spring Equinox.

Equinoxes are times of balance between day and night, light and darkness. But the balance is dynamic, lasting a day, before shifting into playing a role in that greater balance that is the Wheel of the Year. For me this sense of balance should be the dominant theme of either Ostara, or Mabon, the Fall Equinox. But they are very different Sabbats otherwise, for after Ostara the light will continue to grow, whereas after Mabon, it is darkness that increases.

There is another aspect of balance that comes to mind as a am mulling this post over, that between the universal and the concrete. Solar Sabbats are universal, the Greater Sabbats are specific to time and place. Together, they balance the universal with the variety that is local. So while I think it is important to make sure Greater Sabbats are strongly connected with where we live, it is not as important for the Cross Quarter ones.

With these thoughts in mind, I have a few ideas for celebrating Ostara I want to share. All are suitable for Solitaries.

  1. On my altar I will have 4 candles. I will light two, and with sundown, light another. I have tried to figure out a simple but visually beautiful way of symbolizing Sabbats and their meaning, and here is my scheme into which this simple observance fits.

Yule – 1 candle lit during ritual.

Imbolc – 1 candle lit, a second during the ritual.

Ostara – 2 candles lit, a third lit at end of ritual or at sunset.

Beltane – 3 candles, one lit during ritual, making

Midsummer – 4 candles, one extinguished at end of ritual.

Lammas – 3 candles, one extinguished during ritual.

Mabon – 2 candles, one extinguished at sunset or end of ritual.

Samhain – 1 candle lit, but extinguished during ritual.

  1. I will fill my place with local flowers. I just spoke with a friend in Maine. The garden I helped plant still looks like a snow drift. Maybe the willows are changing their color as the sap tentatively rises, making for a good altar decoration. If not, it’s good that this is a solar Sabbat!

3. I will watch the dawn, and do some invocations and prayers while I do it. Ostara is said to have been a Goddess of the Dawn as well as spring, so this is fitting, although very little is known of Her. If I was in Fairbanks, I might let this slide.

  1. In Pagan times eggs and hares were associated with the creation of life and fertility, for obvious reasons. While it seems all folklore of ancient provenance has disputed origins, regardless of how these customs arose and survived, they are perfectly fitted for symbolizing this time, when almost everywhere spring has arrived or is coming soon. Dyeing the eggs in Spring-time colors, and having a good old fashioned Ostara Egg hunt is a wonderful thing for kids.
  2. A good smudging, followed by a good airing if the weather permits. Burning sage is the easiest way to smudge a place, though any cleansing incense is worthwhile. Be sure to get corners and dark places. Energy collects and stagnates in those places, and most of us have had all winter for that to happen.
  3. Plant a seed associated with a magickal ritual for something you want to grow. Simple and personal is best. Focus your intent strongly on the seed, then on the pot of soil after you have planted it. Take care of it. I’d recommend a perennial, that you can plant and let continue to flourish with your care, but maybe an annual will do the trick. Depends on your project.
  4. If you have a yard, this is a good time to begin getting in touch with the spirits of your place. But as with any relationship, it will normally take some time to grow. The last time I lived for any length of time in a house with a yard, I would make weekly offerings in a out of the way part of my yard, that I otherwise left alone (all the rests was garden). I would leave a small glass of rum, some tobacco, and a votive candle (be very careful about fire if you do this). After some months the ‘feel’ of my back yard began to change in ways I and others liked a lot. But remember, attitude makes or breaks this kind of thing – as with all relationships.
  5. If there is a public Sabbat celebration, and you are not part of a coven, try and go. Some are well done, some can seem like ‘ritual abuse,’ but either way, this is a good way to begin meeting other local Pagans. In my view the real magic of what we do is most powerful when we work and celebrate together

Source

Information from Beliefnet

Author: Gus diZerega

Blog: A Pagan’s Blog

Ostara Symbols

Ostara Symbols

Lilies – These beautiful flowers were a symbol of life in Greece and Rome. During the Ostara season, young men would give a lily to the young woman they were courting. If the young woman accepted the lily, the couple were considered engaged (much like accepting a diamond ring from a young man in today’s society).

Lambs – This fluffy little mammal is an eternal symbol of Ostara, and was sacred to virtually all the virgin goddesses of Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. The symbol was so ingrained in the mindset of the people of that region that it was carried over into the spring religious rituals of the Jewish Passover and Christian Easter.

Robins – One of the very first birds to be seen in the Spring, robins are a sure sign of the fact that warm weather has indeed returned.

Bees – These busy little laborers re dormant during the winter. Because of this, the sighting of bees is another sure sign of Spring. They were also considered by the Ancient peoples to be messengers of the Gods and were sacred to many Spring and Sun Goddesses around the world.

Honey – The color of the sun, this amber liquid is, of course, made through the laborious efforts of the honeybee. With their established role as messengers to the Gods, the honey they produced was considered ambrosia to the Gods.

Faeries – Because of their ability to bring blessings to your gardens, protect your home, and look after your animals, it is beneficial to draw faeries to your life. Springtime is the quintessential season to begin drawing the fae again. You want to be sure to leave succulent libations or pretty little gifts for them. Some ideas for libations or gifts are… honey, fresh milk, bread, lilacs, primrose blossoms, cowslip, fresh berries, dandelion wine, honeysuckle, pussy willows, ale, or shiny coins.

Equal-armed Crosses – These crosses represent the turning points of the year, the solstices and equinoxes and are often referred to as ‘Sun Wheels’. They come in many forms such as God’s eyes, Celtic crosses, Shamrocks, Brigid’s crosses, 4-leaved clovers, crossroads, etc.

Ostara: Enter the Light!

Ostara: Enter the Light!

Author:   Mara Light 

In these rather dismal times, people are worrying about their homes, their food, their families, and for those who are of the more humanitarian persuasion, their neighbors. It seems to me every one is wrapped up in their concerns right now, and in turn, wrapped in darkness. Up until a few days ago I was in this same funk, not sure where to turn or how on earth I was going to be happy with the news seeming to get worse and worse. And then as I sat around one day wondering what sabbat or esbat was coming up I was drawn to Ostara and thought, ‘Hm, Easter. I guess I could do something like that…’ and began to read up on it.

I am now very happy I did.

Ostara is a sabbat of light, of joy, of humor, of celebrating and growing. It is a time for balance of light and dark, and finding and starting new paths. ‘That sounds like Imbolc to me.’ some of you might be saying, and I thought so too until I took a closer look. Imbolc is a time when it is dark, and we huddle inside against the cold (unless you’re in the tropics of course) and contemplate where we want our journeys to take us. Think of it as being in a tunnel and seeing a light far ahead of you. You know its there, and you’ll get into it eventually, but you can’t quite reach it yet.

Ostara is the true emergence from this tunnel and into the light. It is time to celebrate and leap for joy! You are SO out of that cave, and the world around you is green!

This ‘lesser’ sabbat is a great one to celebrate; it brings for a sense of freshness and fun. After all, it’s the only holiday I can think of that has cute fluffy bunnies and chickens as their mascots! In the spirit of helping shine a light through the dark clouds hovering over all of us, I have written this article to help bring some fun and interesting facts about Ostara and some ideas for rituals that any one can do whether you’re a millionaire or barely making it. We could all use a break, so I hope this helps to bring some light to you all.

Most pagans know that Oestra, or Eastre, is the goddess of spring. These names stem from the Saxon goddess. She and the god are young and in love, and I can just see them frolicking through the world, and turning things green wherever they go. A sweet story I read—and one I think is more true than other rather ramshackle stories I was looking up—about Oestra and the bunny goes as following:

The goddess was walking through the woods one day when she found a wounded dove. While trying to heal it the magic went a bit off and turned the bird into a rabbit though not fully, for it kept laying eggs! So grateful was the rabbit that it left her the eggs at her door. She was touched by his kindness and rather than keep them for herself colored them bright colors and hid them for others to find that they might enjoy it. Ever since then we have painted eggs for others to find and eat (or eat the treats inside at any rate) .

Colors for this fun sabbat are usually pastels, light greens, pinks, purples, whites, and yellows. Stones used are aquamarine, rose quarts, and moonstone. Alters are usually set up to contain flowers (whether store bought, picked from a field, or fake) , and eggs, birds, or rabbits.

I looked high and low for types of food you’re supposed to eat for this sabbat and it turns out that there isn’t much! Seeds, light greens (such as sprouts) , eggs, and dairy products. No meat (unless you count eggs) is required. Things to do are dyeing eggs, having an egg hunt and races, enjoying and looking for nature around, prosperity spells (we can all use some right now huh?) , starting an herb garden, and renewing your thoughts in a more positive light.

A wonderful ritual that you can do yourself or with your coven, family, or friends, is perfect for renewing yourself. It was made by Patti Wigington, and many blessings to her for this very thoughtful ritual. All you need is a black sheet (as in a bed sheet) and a candle, salt, incense (think floral) , and water. Put the sheet over yourself (if alone) or others (if in a coven or family) , and pass each element over the person (you can make up any words you wish) before telling them (or yourself) to slowly rise and take off the sheet. In doing so you will discard with it all the gloom, sadness, anger, bitterness, or failed results with you. It is time for you to be reborn and enter into the light of spring and love.

Remind the person to take their time, really feel that you’re leaving your old self or fears in the dark cold months of previous times, and entering a world of new chances and hopes.

It is simple, cost efficient, and very effective. I haven’t done this ritual yet myself; but I intend to this coming Ostara. Another ‘thing to do’ that is fun is blessing seeds and then growing them. Seeds are easy and fun to grow, cheap, and hey, you’ll get food from them—if not pretty smelling flowers! I hope you will all remember to have fun and look at the beauty that is entering your life.

The god and goddess are never far from our sides; they show us every day that they are with us. Enjoy the simple pleasures of spring, eat well, and take comfort in the fact that a brighter day is coming. Ostara is a wonderful holiday to celebrate and I hope I have helped to bring some optimism to you all. Blessed Be!

Ode to Ostara

Ode to Ostara

Author:   Morgan Ravenwood 

I really feel sorry for those who complain that their lives seem to pass in a blur. One minute it’s winter, the next it’s summer, and so many people never seem to mark the changing of the seasons until the day they look in the mirror, see the lines on their own faces and the gray hair on their heads, and wonder when they acquired them. I feel fortunate that because I am a Pagan I’m not only observing the seasonal changes but am also actually participating in them (or, as I like to put it, “living a conscious life”) , unlike those who simply view them as a spectator or, worse yet, fail to notice them at all. For surely, if life is but a classroom and we are here to learn certain lessons, we can hardly do otherwise and expect to achieve spiritual growth.

While we Pagans are most famous for our celebration of Samhain, which symbolizes the death of the old year and the beginning of the new one, I believe that it is the Spring Equinox that carries a much more important connotation: that of birth and renewal. There is no better place to watch this cycle play itself out than in a garden.

I live in the southwestern desert where we don’t usually get much of a winter, albeit the nighttime temperatures do dip below freezing at times. Despite the mild weather, my small but productive garden knows what the seasons are, and shows its pleasure in the warmer weather with a riotous green display.

I’m like an excited little kid after I first plant the seeds I’ve chosen to grow; every day I anxiously peer into the various pots, barrels and seedbeds, beside myself with curiosity to see if the first seedling has made its appearance yet. Of all the stress-relieving exercises known to man, this has got to be one of the easiest and best. It’s also highly effective for a Pagan in that it offers an opportunity to temporarily abandon the cares of the world and perform a life-affirming activity, which is also one in which they can actually commune with the divine if they will but listen as well as speak. That this can be achieved by performing such a simple activity as tending a garden is part of the deep appeal of Paganism. This is why I feel that every Pagan should attempt to grow something, even if it’s just a houseplant or a few herb seeds in a small pot on a windowsill. It’s also a particularly great way to introduce children to one of the fundamental beliefs of Paganism: that divinity is inherent in all of nature.

In a garden we not only can see the metaphorical drama of the Goddess and God, but of our own lives as well: the seed is planted, it grows to adulthood, produces seed of its own, dies, and is resurrected through its seed, which has been planted in its place. The message is, of course, that nothing is ever truly wasted or dies. Anybody who would argue with that has surely never been a gardener!

This birth-death-resurrection cycle plays in all aspects of organic and biological life. I had an opportunity to meditate on this when my pregnant daughter showed me an ultrasound picture of her baby girl, who was my first grandchild. A myriad of images and emotions swept through me as I gazed upon the image of this tiny little creature lying curled up like a new rosebud. It seemed that I could hear my mother’s voice and see my father’s face and feel their love and pride, and yet above that I also heard and felt the presence of something even greater and more awesome.

Other images flashed before my eyes and mind; I saw myself as a baby and my husband as a child. I thought of the day I learned that I was pregnant with my daughter and saw my husband’s joyful countenance when he held her for the first time. And then I thought how appropriate the term “family tree” is. Whoever coined it must have had some Pagan leanings, to be sure! But most of all, as I looked at that picture, I felt like I’d actually made a difference in this world. And I think that anyone who takes the opportunity-and responsibility–in nurturing a life, whether it’s planting a garden, raising a kitten or having a child, has been given the wonderful opportunity to share a little bit of the divinity—and immortality—that is unique to the gods. For sure, allowing us to share this with them is their greatest gift to us.

The idea of new life springing forward after a long period of silence and stillness is a concept that is shared in most religions today, and it is no secret that all of them have incorporated many elements of the earlier Pagan faiths into their own doctrines. I am betting that many people in these religions today are unaware of the extent of their syncretism. All that most Christians know about Neo-Paganism is that its one and only holiday appears to be “Halloween” (which is known to us as Samhain) . They do not realize that while they are celebrating Easter as a strictly Christian holiday, its roots, as well as its name, originated completely in Pagan faiths.

Ostara, of course, is the holiday that is celebrated at the Vernal Equinox to herald the return of life and light to the world, and its rituals and events largely mirror those of the Christians sans the religious observances in a church, of course. Pagan children need not miss out on the usual springtime celebrations; when my children were still living at home, we always colored and hid eggs for them. We would always plant some seeds or young plants and try to balance eggs on one end at the minute of the Equinox, with which we had a fair amount of luck. The kids loved Ostara because it came earlier than Easter.

However, no children are required for Pagan adults to join in the fun. I still color eggs even when the grandkids can’t visit, and will always continue my seed-planting ritual. The weather around Ostara is usually pretty nice where I live, so I try to get outdoors to spend some time with Nature and observe its rapid changes. After so many years of celebrating our sabbats, it would feel strange NOT to do these things.

I hope I have given some helpful tips on how to celebrate Ostara. May all your celebrations be blessed ones!