Tarot 101: Shattering the Myths of Tarot

Tarot 101: Shattering the Myths of Tarot

Learn the truth about this amazing tool

 

Does the Tarot seems intimidating? Have you had a fear of getting readings? Unsure of what the Tarot does? Brigit Esselmont, founder of BiddyTarot.com, will help you demystify Tarot, busting some of the biggest myths about reading Tarot cards…

Myth 1: You have to be psychic to read Tarot

Many people will have you believe that you have to be psychic to read Tarot. That is, to be a good Tarot reader, you have to have some sort of supernatural power that allows you to see into the future, know what people are thinking, or receive messages from the spirit world.

The truth is: You don’t have to be psychic to be a good Tarot reader. In fact, anyone can learn to read Tarot — including you. All you need to do is say yes to your intuition.

We are all intuitive beings. Every one of us. But many people have shut down their intuition, refusing to listen to their inner voice. They downplay the intuitive flashes they get and pass them off as a silly feeling that means nothing. Instead, say “yes” to those random, unexplainable messages you might receive that help you to navigate your life’s path. Say “yes” to going with your heart, not just your head.

Myth 2: Tarot will tell you your future

This one isn’t completely a myth, but it isn’t exactly the whole truth either… Many people see the Tarot as a fortunetelling tool. And, not only that, they believe that whatever the Tarot says will happen in the future, will happen, no matter what. Some people are so afraid of having their cards read because they worry that if they do, something bad will happen as a result.

The truth is: Tarot can tell you about not just your future, but also your past and your present. Understanding the past helps you discover the key lessons you’ve learned along your path so that you can make better decisions in the future. And understanding the present helps you discover what’s happening for you right now.

The future is not set in stone. Yes, the Tarot can predict the future — but “predict” is the key word here. It means that the Tarot can show you where you are headed based on where you are now. Don’t like where you’re headed? Then you can make changes right now to reshape your future! It all comes down to your free will and your ability to make choices.

Long story short: Tarot helps you understand your past and present to enable you to make good, positive choices that will shape your future. The future is in your hands and it’s yours to create.

Myth 3: Tarot is mysterious and complex

Look up “Tarot reader” on the internet and you’ll be met with images of mysterious-looking women in bohemian clothes, peering into a crystal ball, foretelling the future. This is not an accurate representation of what a Tarot reader is really like!

The truth is: People from ALL walks of life read Tarot — office workers, teachers, coaches, therapists, lawyers, executives, nurses — you name it. Just ordinary, normal people who have learned how to use the Tarot cards to connect with their intuition and navigate life’s challenges.

Tarot doesn’t have to be mysterious and complex. Tarot can be simple, fun and easy to learn. Anyone can do it, including you!

 

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Your Daily Tarot Cards, Runes & Ogham Reading

The Daily Tarot Card is The Empress

The Empress

Keywords: ideas, creative impulses, intellect!

Astrological Correspondence: Venus

The Empress signifies the queen of life, the ideal woman, the archetypal mother. She represents the matriarchal goddess, being part of nature, fertility, sexuality, and the generative forces. As the life-giving mother she is connected to the Earth and the natural rhythms, the appreciation of the senses. As a card of good fortune she signifies that if we are gentle and caring, as well as patient, we can bring anything to fruition; we have to be able to wait until the time is right for action so that we can reap the rewards; as a result, hard work pays off and relationships become satisfying. The Empress can, in negative situations, also depict vanity, undeveloped creativity, stagnation, and apathy.

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The Daily Tarot Love Card for is Justice

Justice

If single, you attract attention today. Be social when you and others are so relaxed. Today scores of people amuse and interest you. You link up with people who need to be in your life. Be aware that they may not be your soul mates, but they know them or know someone who knows them. You expand the boundaries of love in your Significant other union when you clear up emotional debris.

 

 

 

 

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Your Daily Erotic Tarot Card is Temperance

Temperance

The Temperance card represents erotic fairness and compromise, and perhaps even the necessity to calm passions in order to build up another part of your relationship. Have you been concentrating so much on the physical aspect of love that you’ve forgotten to nurture the mental, emotional, or spiritual side of things? Put a temporary hold on sex so that you can explore other aspects of a partnership. When the moratorium is over, prepare for some mind-blowing passion that will help make up for lost time!

 

 

 

 

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Your Weekend Influences

Tarot Influence:

Five of Wands

There may be obstacles on your path. Courage will be required to overcome them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Astrological Influence

Cancer

Creativity and a love of home are the key elements of Cancer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Element Influence

Air

Air denotes freedom and the ability to transcend the mundane. You may be, or may soon experience a spiritual or secular.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Your Daily Rune for Friday

 

Laguz

“Log-uhz” – Literally: “Water” or Ocean – Esoteric: Unconscious, Collective Memory

Rune of the unconscious context of becoming or the evolutionary process. Rune of Life’s longing for itself.

Psi: emotion, psychic powers, unconscious mental processes, love, dreaming

Energy: life energy, ocean spirit, origins of life, collective unconscious, the astral plane, love as unity, evolution

Mundane: water, imagination, occultism, dreams

Divinations: Life, passing a test, sea of vitality and of the unconscious growth, memory, dreams; or fear, circular motion, avoidance, withering, depression, manipulations, emotional blackmail, lack of moral fiber, fantasy, poison, toxicity

Governs:

Transpersonal powers
Mastery of emotion in order to shape wyrd
Guidance through difficult initiatory tests, ie. initiation into life
Increase in vitality and life force
Communication between your conscious mind to another’s unconscious mind
Development of ‘second sight’ or prophetic wisdom
All powers of dreaming (lucid dreams, astral projection)

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Daily Witches Runes is The Rings

 

The Rings

Keywords: Love, relationships.

Meanings: The Rings is the rune of love and when it is the leading stone, it is a positive answer to your question. It is very much a rune of relationship and can indicate engagement, marriage or a new/renewed relationship. It can also indicate the need for a fresh approach to an existing relationship.

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Your Ogham Reading is Ura-Heather

Ura-Heather

The beauty of heather flowers is one reason it is associated with the Irish Goddess of love, fertility, and new growth. Be happy when you draw this letter because it denotes love, companionship, and passion. Whether it will be a new love or an old love rekindled, Ura is a powerful symbol and one that may bring great luck in your love life.

Fortune – This Ogham deals in matters of Love. Whether it is new love or rekindling of old love, enjoy the peace and love that comes with Ura!

“Walk barefoot, listen to the wind, drink in the moon…. BE MAGICK”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tarot 101: The 3 Steps of a Tarot Reading

Tarot 101: The 3 Steps of a Tarot Reading

Learn Tarot the easy way in three simple steps

Brigit Esselmont

Here, you’ll get a quick crash course in Tarot, learning what the Tarot is and how it works.

What Is Tarot?

Ultimately, the Tarot is a deck of 78 cards that are enriched with images and symbols that help you connect with your intuition to make better, more spiritually-grounded decisions in your life. Many people turn to Tarot cards to help them understand and move forward in their relationships, career, finances, personal development, and major life changes.

The Tarot can also be used to help you understand your past, present, or future. It doesn’t tell you exactly what will happen — like the date when you’ll meet your future husband, or the first letter of your unborn baby’s name — but it does give you some insight into where you may be headed if you continue on your current path. It also gives you the space to make powerful and positive changes now so you can manifest your goals and your dreams in the future. What this means is that the future is indeed in your hands!

Every Tarot deck is typically made up of 78 cards, each with its own unique picture, symbolism, and meaning. While there are commonly agreed meanings for each card, it’s also very powerful to discover your own meanings of the cards as you connect intimately and intuitively with their images and symbols. Creating this kind of personal connection with the Tarot cards is where the magic happens, and what makes reading Tarot so special.

How does a Tarot reading work?

Ultimately, a Tarot reading boils down to a 3-step process:

Step 1: Create your question.

  • How can I find love this year?
  • Where is my career heading, and how can I make the most of my talents?

Step 2: Shuffle and lay out the cards.

As you’re shuffling, make sure you’re concentrating on your question to channel your energy into the reading and layout of the cards. Then when you feel ready, lay out the cards for your reading.

Step 3: Interpret the cards and answer your question.

This is the fun part! Go through each card and interpret what it means for you. Also, look at the reading as a whole and see what important messages and answers come through for you in the reading.

Of course, there’s a little more to a Tarot reading than these three simple steps, but if you’re just starting out, follow these three steps and you’ll be reading Tarot in no time! While some people prefer to have their Tarot cards read by professional Tarot readers, learning to read Tarot for yourself is like having the universe on speed dial! It’s such a gift to yourself to connect deeply with your intuition and have the Tarot cards as your spiritual guide.

 

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Tarot Card of the Day is Queen of Pentacles

Tarot Card of the Day

Queen of Coins

76

Traditionally, representing the energy of a Queen, this feminine guardian is endowed with enormous good sense and problem solving energy, but she is not particularly entrepreneurial. She loves to advise, encourage, and empower those she gets involved with, studying their problems with them and setting them up to solve them. Traditionally, she was pictured as the Sibyl or Oracle, perhaps a Tarot reader, who made herself available to people in need, no matter what their social class or situation. In modern times, she will be found educating, healing, managing disaster aid programs or a charitable drive of some sort.

In every case, she does not see the benefits that exist in her life as belonging solely to her. She feels the needs of her people and will spend freely of her time, energy, skills, money to see that nobody is left out. For this, and because she likes to work in an atmosphere of beauty, enjoyment and abundance, she is sometimes accused of being extravagant. But she works hard, and she sees no reason to deny herself the rewards of a job well done. Everyone who comes in contact with her feels enriched by her enjoyment in living.

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A Page of Bind Runes for Your Book of Shadows (Printable)

Introduction to the Runes

Introduction to the Runes

(Original Author was Lady Abyss)

 

Runes originate in the Viking period, in the time of Odin, the chief god of Norse mythology, a time
when longboats sailed from the fjords of Scandinavia on military missions. It is part of Viking legend
that Odin’s horse, Sleipnir, had runic symbols engraved upon its teeth. Maybe for this reason, the 19th
rune is called Ehwaz, the horse.

 

Fortunately runes and runic symbols did not die with the Vikings. Thanks to television and film, many
people who would otherwise know nothing of the Vikings are aware of them, their gods and their
lifestyle, but relatively few also know that the lore of the Vikings continues well into our modern-day
lives through the use of the runes.

 

Every rune symbolises not only an alphabetical letter, but a deeper meaning, an energy. It is our aim
to show the relevance of the wisdom of the runes even in this day and age in our everyday lives as we
progress through this book. At the end of the day, wisdom is ageless and its source never dries up.

What Is The Futhark?

Runes are often called the Futhark, Futhorc or Elder Futhark after the first six letters of the runic
alphabet in traditional order. The runic alphabet has undergone various changes over the years, and
runic characters are not only the alphabet of their time but also have their own meanings. They are not
mere letters with sounds, and in many ways are similar in character to ancient Egyptian or Hebrew.

 

Those who are interested in language foundation may already know that runic was originally the
language of the northern Germanic races, and that there are remarkable similarities between runic and
other early languages, such as early Celtic. Stemming from an unwritten language, the runic symbols
were often regarded as magical.

 

All the characters of the runic alphabet are in straight lines, as with the Ogham alphabet, of which we
will learn a little more at a later stage. This is probably because it made them easier to carve on stone.
As we progress with our studies of the runes, we will link the runic symbol with its modern English
alphabetical equivalent.

 

What Are Runes?

Runes are both strangely marked standing stones found in Scandinavia (more correctly known as
runestones rather than runes) and also smaller stones or wooden pieces used as a tool towards self-knowledge
and self-help. There are some fine examples of runestones in Stockholm Museum.

 

Many runic carvings can still be found throughout Europe, but unfortunately some of the original
carvings, many made in wood, have now perished, and only the stone carvings remain.

 

Until relatively recently, runes were seldom heard of and seldom used outside Scandinavia. Readers
of Tolkien may have heard of runes, but few people understood their significance. However, their
very accessible symbolism began to attract more attention towards the end of the 1960s, and today
many people around the world are using them.

 

Unfortunately the traditional meanings of the runes and their uses have been lost in time, and modern
interpretations have had to be formulated. However, as with the Tarot, the runes lend themselves to
the use of intuition, and most modern runemasters rely heavily on this faculty.

 

The Meaning of Runes

The word rune (sometimes also seen as run, runa or runar) actually means ‘secret’, ‘whisper’ or
‘mystery’, and it is therefore probably no surprise that the original meanings were never written down,
just as the Kabbala in Hebrew/Chaldean times was never written down, but passed on by word of
mouth.

 

The fact, however, that the runic symbols were at least carved in rocks meant that they survived, both
as a means of communication and as a means of self-enquiry, or as the Vikings thought, a means of
getting in touch with the gods.

 

Thinking In Terms Of Symbolism

Runes have links with many other forms, and are very much in tune with I Ching (the Chinese Book
of Changes). It is fair to say that in a sense they were the I Ching of the Viking race. Just as I Ching is
concerned with polarities, so are runes, but whereas in I Ching the polarities are termed yin and yang,
in runic lore they are fire and ice – images easily understood by the Vikings.

 

As with Tarot symbolism, which does not end with the picture, runic symbolism does not stop with
the outline of the character. The hope is that the drawing or casting of the runes will produce
information enabling us to access our own unconscious, thus expanding our awareness and shedding
light on our options.

 

Runes can help with what modern-day psychologists call ‘the learning process’. They carry inner
meanings which go far beyond their initial appearance and shape. They will give honest answers, but
sometimes these answers may not be what we want or expect.

 

The trick is, at such times, to learn from that answer and to broaden our horizons and experiences.
Maybe our destiny lies in a different direction to that which we would wish.

 

Symbolism can suggest many meanings; the aim in using the runes is to allow the symbolism to
permeate the very heart of our being and contact the essence of man.

 

Runes can help to form a bridge between our logical thinking mind, and that part of ourselves which
few understand, but so many wish to find.

 

Asking Questions

Whatever you seek an answer on, you can consult the runes for their wisdom. The question need not
have great worldly significance, and may even be fairly trivial – though never frivolous. The main
emphasis should be on the need for an answer. Whilst purists would say that one should not ask the
runes questions pertaining to the future (such as whether something is likely to turn out well or not),
questions can range from ‘Should I think of moving house now?’ to something more profound that
involves spiritual or emotional needs.

The only time you are unlikely to get a straightforward answer is if the blank rune appears, in which
case the situation is likely to be in a state of flux, or it is too early to judge the issue effectively. We
will look at the blank rune later.

Casting The Runes

Casting The Runes

Each individual will eventually devise his or her own way of casting the runes. What follows are some
suggestions, all following a similar path, but they are by no means fixed rules.

 

It is important to remember that your runes are your own, and are special. You have created a link
with them and that is important. Never lend your runes, unless you feel comfortable doing this. I
personally would never lend runes, Tarot cards or crystals to anyone else. If you are unsure, maybe
you should try drawing a rune from your pouch and seeing what you get as an answer. It is suggested
that an upright rune gives a Yes answer, and an inverted one a No answer. However, those runes
which look the same either way may prove a problem!

 

A traditional way of casting the runes is to mix them in a pouch and cast them on a cloth, usually
velvet. I keep my runes in such a pouch and use them in this way. It usually happens that the runes I
am intended to use find their way into my hand or between my fingers as I mix them in the pouch. I
usually draw nine runes.

 

Others have suggested drawing three runes at a time, three times, with a break in between each set of
three.

 

Old Nordic tales suggest that throwing runes at a person was a means of casting a magical spell.
Likewise spells are said to have been cast by writing certain runic inscriptions on a piece of paper and
passing it to the unsuspecting intended victim.

 

All these things may belong in folklore, and have no bearing on the modern usage for runes; it is up to
the individual to decide. One runemaster I know draws three runes which represent current
circumstances. Having looked at these three runes, he returns them to the pouch and draws three
more. The second set of three represents courses of action or possible outcomes. The second set is
then also returned to the pouch and a final single rune drawn, which indicates influences likely to have
a bearing on the problem as a whole.

 

Tradition suggests that Odin’s number was 5. For this reason, some runemasters work with only five
runes. Those interested in numerology will note that the runes total 25 if you include the blank rune.
This all adds up to 7, which is a powerful and spiritual number, and for this reason, perhaps, some
runemasters draw seven runes when casting.

 

Another means of casting the runes is to ‘shuffle them’ and leave them to their own devices for a while
(15 minutes is usually suggested), and then draw 12, laying them on a runic chart especially
prepared for the purpose.

Tarot Card of the Day

Tarot Card of the Day

Knight of Swords

61

 

This card is traditionally entitled The Knight, but in some modern decks appears as The Prince. Traditionally, this card portrays the restless mind, aroused by thoughts of offense and defense, storming around searching for a target to pounce on. He often feels slighted, has a chip on his shoulder and bristles with a hostile attitude. His usual method is to look for someone to blame for his irritation.

Furthermore, in an attitude of righteousness, he may assign himself the job of correcting the offender. Jumping easily to conclusions, he shoots first, asks questions later and is therefore often guilty of overkill. This is not to say that he does not have his heroic side; a single-minded combativeness can have its value. However, even when he is doing the right thing, he is likely to be doing it for the wrong reasons. Apt advice for this card is to deeply question your motives for what you are thinking about doing. Forethought will assist you in discriminating between righteous and unrighteous causes. Control any traces of impulsive judgement!

Occasionally you will notice in the detail on the card, that the person can be a woman rather than the expected man. There is some evidence that the tradition of knighthood included a certain number of “anonymous knights” who took mythic names and veiled their true identities. Living on the road with few or no servants, they served as freelance defenders of travelers, champions of the little people against the exploitation of both highway robbers and the wealthy classes. Odds are that some of these knights-errant were camouflaged women, and that idea is preserved with the traditional representation of the Sword Knight.

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Your Daily Tarot Card for Thursday

The Hanged Man

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keywords: Accepting, reflective, observant, calm, sacrifice!

Astrological Correspondence: Neptune

The Hanged Man is an unsettling, mysterious card, because it symbolizes the reversal of our life situations, all contradictions we face in ourselves and in life in general, and paradox in action. Although the Hanged Man seems restricted and helpless, he looks calm and relaxed. In this position the card represents the rational mind being turned off, acceptance of a new situation, a unique point of view, reflection and serenity. Deeply thoughtful, he seems to have reached a higher consciousness. By letting go and giving up, as painful as it may be, this symbolism suggests that we can overcome restrictions, find what we have been looking for, and ultimately become free, self-determined beings. In a negative setting the symbolism suggests manipulation, passivity, useless sacrifice, and apathy.

Today’s I Ching Hexagram

Today’s I Ching Hexagram:

45: Coming Together

Hexagram 45
General Meaning: The power of gathering together is represented by a rally, where each individual’s strength is magnified by the power of their community. History has shown that mass movements can bring about stable, ordered and durable conditions for the better. This hexagram may be pointing to an auspicious time for large undertakings. But the guiding force of your shared vision is essential to hold the forces of unity together, and keep them advancing toward a common goals and values.

Another image for this situation is that of a lake filling with water. Just as the fullness of the lake can bring good fortune to all in its sphere, it can also overflow, leading to calamity. Thus in a time of gathering together it is essential that precautions against excesses be considered along with efforts to advance along a clearly-charted course. Much of human misfortune comes from unexpected events for which we are ill prepared; when gathered together with others, we are both more powerful and, in some ways, also more vulnerable.

Any time of unified coming together is a time of great potential. But the potential can be both positive and negative. Everything is magnified when people unite around a central shared purpose. When many people unite behind a single goal or strong vision, it is wise to take personal precautions to protect your own reasonable self-interests, because these can easily be lost in the crowd.

Making Your Own Runes

Making Your Own Runes

 

Before deciding what to make your runes out of, it is worth considering which alphabetical system to
use. These follow several forms, but most runes will use the common German Futhark symbols popular use today.

 

However, if you feel you have an affinity with ancient English, a little alteration will
produce slightly different symbols. As you learn more about runes and read more about their usage,
you may find that you end up with several sets of runes, all using different symbolism. Make sure,
however, that you keep each set of runes separate and do not mix the systems.

 

There are many substances you can choose to make your own runes. If you want to make them out of
pebbles, try to ensure that the pebbles are similar in size, and be very careful to copy the symbols
exactly if endeavoring to paint them yourself. Also make sure that you use a paint which will not
flake or fade, preferably made from a natural pigment. It is said that the Vikings often used blood to
stain their runes; I wouldn’t recommend this, but I would suggest that a red pigment is used, red
having a strong association with the god Thor. Those who wish to use the colour associated with Odin
should use blue. Traditionally it is suggested that the pebbles used should be gathered from the
seashore during a storm, so bear this in mind should you live near or be visiting the seaside!

 

People who are keen on pottery or have access to a kiln may like to try to make their runes out of clay
or ceramics. Another possibility is making a set out of card. This is especially useful as a starting set,
or if money is scarce. Each runic card should be around 1″ wide by 2″ long at least.

 

Those who are able to carve might like trying to make a set of runes out of one of the traditional
woods, such as hazel, birch, ash or apple. Ash is a strongly runic tree, being the tree in which Odin
hung, and birch is also a wood traditionally used for rune-making. Apple wood is often used because
of the connection with the Goddess Idun, who kept apples in a basket which, it is said, kept age at bay.

 

Some runemasters suggest that it is acceptable to make runes out of yew, but others suggest that, to
the Vikings, the yew was a tree of death, and so should not be used. This stems from the fact that its
bark, leaves, roots and fruit are all poisonous. However, it can also be seen as the tree of life, as it
stays green throughout the year, and can be regenerated by its own daughter-tree growing in the soil
inside the dying trunk. It is therefore up to the individual to decide whether to use yew or not.

 

Tradition suggests that such wood should be cut from a tree during the waning of the moon, and
chopped into the 25 pieces immediately. It is important to ask permission of the tree before doing this,
explaining the purpose behind your action. The tree is a living thing and should be treated with
respect. It is of course equally important that you ask permission of the tree’s owner, should it not be
in your own garden! Some traditions also suggest that you should leave a silver coin somewhere
within the tree for payment, but this is up to the individual concerned.

 

Each piece should be flattened and smoothed before the symbols are carved, and sharp tools used.
Any paint put onto the carving to darken or further distinguish the symbols should be made from a
natural pigment. Another way of marking the runes could be burning the letters, but this should be
done with care and by someone who knows exactly what they are doing. Likewise it is important to be
fairly confident, when making your own runes out of wood, firstly that you have enough wood for the
job, and secondly that you are capable of the task.

 

As it is said that Wednesday connects with Odin (Woden’s day -Woden being another form of Odin),
you may decide to embark upon making your runes on that day.

 

Cleansing And Protecting The Runes

As with crystals, runes should be cleaned, especially if they are bought from a commercial outlet.
They should be washed in natural water, preferably spring water, or at least mineral water (check the
label to make sure that it has not been irradiated), and left to dry before being put into a pouch or bag,
which traditionally should be leather, felt, silk or velvet. A pouch with a drawstring is ideal. Tradition
suggests that the drawstring or thong should be leather, but those people who are against using animal
products may think otherwise.

Some people who have made their own runes out of wood like to keep them in a box made of the
same wood from the same tree. Again, this is a matter of personal preference. Many runemasters also
use a casting cloth, onto which the runes are cast. This is another matter of personal choice, but it is
worth noting that a casting cloth will help to prevent damage to the runes and keep them clean.

Ways Of Casting The Runes

Ways Of Casting The Runes

 

There are probably hundreds of different ways to lay the runes for a casting. What is given here is
only a selection. It is by no means exhaustive.

I would suggest that you try some of these, going for the ones with which you feel comfortable before
trying your own ideas out. The reasons for this are many, not least of which it is important to
familiarise yourself with the runes and how they are read as a group before progressing.

It should also be remembered that you may have some personal thoughts on the meanings of the runes
at the time you are carrying out the casting, which you should not dismiss out of hand. The meanings
given here are basic, and again by no means exhaustive. You may for example wish to use all
the reverse meanings given, even though some runes look the same either way up. Experience is the
best teacher, and you must always do what you feel comfortable doing. Don’t go along with something
just because others do – make up your own mind.

Another means of casting the runes consists of five runes, called Odin’s casting. Again these are laid
down from right to left, with the third rune slightly raised from the remainder. I read these as being
two pages within a book with the third rune being that which is either holding the pages together, or
conversely, stopping them from being turned. I use a similar layout in Tarot readings.

Similar layout could be used with seven runes.

You could also consider using a 12 rune casting, linking each rune either with a month or with a sign
of the zodiac. This is usually laid out in a circle, as in Figure 7.3, although I have seen many
variations of this.

Yet another suggestion would be what is sometimes called the rune-cast method. Basically, you ‘shuffle’ the runes within their pouch, and having formed a circle of string on the floor, empty the pouch into it.

Those runes nearest to you have the greatest meaning. Should any have fallen outside the string circle,
these can be ignored; likewise if they fall on the string or have fallen face downwards.

There are many more ways of casting the runes, and no doubt you will find one suitable for you.
Experiment and practise.

Green Witch Tarot

My question today for a general reading on this card was “Will we come out of this crazy time able to keep our homes, food, and clothes on our backs?” The card comes from the Green Witch Tarot Companion Book copyright 2015 by Ann Moura.

This card indicates that financial plans are coming together. There is a sense of peace and tranquility fostered by financial security and plans set in favorably in motion. Here the Queen of Pentacles sits comfortably in her fruitful pecan grove. Bountiful nature offers stability, and she feels the kindly influence of nature’s energies working with her. When this appears in a reading, one has the ability to bring to fruition plans leading to an economic security and well-being. Nurturing practical ambitions brings self-sufficiency and confidence. One may be inclined to luxury and seeking social standing, but this is tempered by generosity.

This card suggests planning ahead and having those plans work out as hoped. Money resources are under control, so there is a calm wisdom in money management and a strong, sensible utilization of funds. There is  prosperity and independence as well. Sometimes this card may signify a single-parent household where fiances are carefully monitored, or a lesser income that is successfully supplementing a larger one to have money for lighthearted entertainment, vacations, or small luxury.

Pecans, for prosperity and abundance, are gathered in a basket beside the Queen of Pentacles. A white dove, a symbol of prosperity, harmony, and wisdom, sits on a tree branch.

Meaning: Financial plans realized fruitfulness, independence, work rewarded, stability, dignity, practical ambition, attainment of physical goals, self-sufficiency, able to provide for self and others, social position and success.

Prompt Words: Financial plans realized.

Tarot for the Green Witch Card’s for Money and Health

 These are from a tarot deck by author of “The Green Witchcraft Series” Ann Moura Copyright 2015

I drew these cards with the questions what do my readers need to know about today. This card fell out “Knight of Athames”  I heard the word “money”. Both of their meanings come from “The Green Witch Tarot Companion” 

This is s card  of swift action, especially once one’s mind is made up.There is determination and an aggressive approach to getting something done, so the inherent warning is to look before leaping. Spur-of-the-moment enthusiasm and the excitement of embarking on a new objective  could result in a lack of preparation or making a premature commitment without a solid understanding of what is involved. There a an element of impulsiveness and a sense of self-assuredness that could board on recklessness in pursuit of adventure. However, this card indicates a smart, eager, and courageous person who is goal-focused and has the capacity to succeed with determination and incisiveness. Sudden changes are possible, as well as the skill to solve one’s own problems. Impatience and a quick temper may hinder cooperation from others; however, this card indicates someone who is competent and able to take charge for a successful conclusion.

Peppermint for action, challenges, and accomplishment, grows wild along the track. A badger, a symbol of assertiveness, determination, and action, watches from one side of the track.

Meaning: Swift action, aggressive energy, self-assured, sudden changes, boldness, courage, ability, skill, incisive career activity, bravery, heroic action, quick implementation of ideas.

 

 

 

ODIN’S DISCOVERY OF THE RUNES

ODIN’S DISCOVERY OF THE RUNES

The Norse god Odin is a relentless seeker after knowledge and wisdom, and is willing to sacrifice almost anything for this pursuit. The most outstanding feature of his appearance, his one eye, attests to this; he sacrificed his other eye for more wisdom. The tale of how he discovered the runes is another example of his unquenchable thirst for understanding the mysteries of life, not to mention his unstoppable will.The runes are the written letters that were used by the Norse and other Germanic peoples before the adoption of the Latin alphabet in the later Middle Ages. Unlike the Latin alphabet, which is an essentially utilitarian script, the runes are symbols of some of the most powerful forces in the cosmos. In fact, the word “rune” and its cognates across past and present Germanic languages mean both “letter” and “secret/mystery.” The letters called “runes” allow one to access, interact with, and influence the world-shaping forces they symbolize. Thus, when Odin sought the runes, he wasn’t merely attempting to acquire a set of arbitrary representations of human vocal sounds. Rather, he was uncovering an extraordinarily potent system of magic.

Odin’s Discovery of the Runes

At the center of the Norse cosmos stands the great tree Yggdrasil. Yggdrasil’s upper branches cradle Asgard, the home and fortress of the Aesir gods and goddesses, of whom Odin is the chief.

Yggdrasil grows out of the Well of Urd, a pool whose fathomless depths hold many of the most powerful forces and beings in the cosmos. Among these beings are the Norns, three sagacious maidens who create the fatesof all beings. One of the foremost techniques they use to shape fate is carving runes into Yggdrasil’s trunk. The symbols then carry these intentions throughout the tree, affecting everything in the Nine Worlds.

Odin watched the Norns from his seat in Asgard and envied their powers and their wisdom. And he bent his will toward the task of coming to know the runes.

Since the runes’ native home is in the Well of Urd with the Norns, and since the runes do not reveal themselves to any but those who prove themselves worthy of such fearful insights and abilities, Odin hung himself from a branch of Yggdrasil, pierced himself with his spear, and peered downward into the shadowy waters below. He forbade any of the other gods to grant him the slightest aid, not even a sip of water. And he stared downward, and stared downward, and called to the runes.

He survived in this state, teetering on the precipice that separates the living from the dead, for no less than nine days and nights. At the end of the ninth night, he at last perceived shapes in the depths: the runes! They had accepted his sacrifice and shown themselves to him, revealing to him not only their forms, but also the secrets that lie within them. Having fixed this knowledge in his formidable memory, Odin ended his ordeal with a scream of exultation.

Having been initiated into the mysteries of the runes, Odin recounted:

Then I was fertilized and became wise;
I truly grew and thrived.
From a word to a word I was led to a word,
From a work to a work I was led to a work.

Equipped with the knowledge of how to wield the runes, he became one of the mightiest and most accomplished beings in the cosmos. He learned chants that enabled him to heal emotional and bodily wounds, to bind his enemies and render their weapons worthless, to free himself from constraints, to put out fires, to expose and banish practitioners of malevolent magic, to protect his friends in battle, to wake the dead, to win and keep a lover, and to perform many other feats like these.[1]

“Sacrificing Myself to Myself”

Our source for the above tale is the Hávamál, an Old Norse poem that comprises part of the Poetic Edda. In the first of the two verses that describe Odin’s shamanic initiatory ordeal itself (written from Odin’s perspective), the god says that he was “given to Odin, myself to myself.” The Old Norse phrase that translates to English as “given to Odin” is gefinn Óðni, a phrase that occurs many times throughout the Eddas and sagas in the context of human sacrifices to Odin. And, in fact, the form these sacrifices take mirrors Odin’s ordeal in the Hávamál; the victim, invariably of noble birth, was stabbed, hung, or, more commonly, both at the same time.[2]

Odin’s ordeal is therefore a sacrifice of himself to himself, and is the ultimate Odinnic sacrifice – for who could be a nobler offering to the god than the god himself?

So, it seems that a statement above is in need of qualification. Part of Odin survived the sacrifice in order to be the recipient of the sacrifice – in addition to the runes themselves – and another part of him did indeed die. This is suggested, not just by the imagery of death in these verses, but also by the imagery of rebirth and fecundity in the following verses that speak of his being “fertilized,” and, like a seedling, “growing,” and “thriving.”

Even a casual browsing of the Eddas and sagas alerts the reader to how accomplished, self-possessed, and inwardly strong many of their central figures are, especially the most Odinnic of them (such as Egill Skallagrimsson, Starkad, Sigurd, and Grettir Asmundarson). Perhaps their strength of character was largely due to the example set by their divine patron, with the songs sung in his honor telling of how he wasn’t afraid to sacrifice what we might call his “lower self” to his “higher self,” to live according to his highest will unconditionally, accepting whatever hardships arise from that pursuit, and allowing nothing, not even death, to stand between him and the attainment of his goals.

Looking for more great information on Norse mythology and religion? While this site provides the ultimate online introduction to the topic, my book The Viking Spirit provides the ultimate introduction to Norse mythology and religion period. I’ve also written a popular list of The 10 Best Norse Mythology Books, which you’ll probably find helpful in your pursuit.

The Viking Spirit Daniel McCoy

References:

[1] The Poetic Edda. Hávamál, stanzas 138-163.

[2] Turville-Petre, E.O.G. 1964. Myth and Religion of the North: The Religion of Ancient Scandinavia. p. 42-50.

Published on Norse Mythology for Smart People