The Witches Magick for Wednesday – Revenge Curse Jar Spell and How to Protect Yourself From Backlash

Magical Mud-Slinging: How to Protect Yourself from Backlash

A question that I get asked very often (by which I mean about once a week) is some variation of “How do I protect myself from the backlash of casting baneful magic / perform cursing without consequences?”
Well, the truth is that there is no way of performing baneful magic without incurring consequences. As I’ve so often said, “You can’t sling mud without getting your hands dirty.” But just like with mud, there are things you can do to mitigate the mess.

Step 1: “Wear Gloves.”
Protect yourself with a personal ward before you begin. Try to limit the number of tools you use to put the curse together. Cast a protective circle, if you feel the need. Prepare materials to refresh your household wards, if you have them, because they’ll need boosting after you’re done.

Step 2: “Wash Your Hands.”
Once you’ve finished whatever it is you set out to do, cleanse EVERYTHING. Yourself, your tools, your home…everything, top to bottom. Take a shower with a bit of Simple Jinx Remover to keep the magical “sludge” from sticking to you. Refresh your household wards. If you don’t have them, a simple sprinkling of salt across doorways and windowsills will do the trick.

Step 3: “Pay the Price.”
It’s important to know that there is a cost to everything. “All Magic Has A Price.” With baneful spells, the effect is more severe because of the intent of the magic involved. It can range from just having a couple of bad days to a full-on backlash where the curse you threw boomerangs around and bites you square in the ass. Whatever you do, no matter how well you prepare, there will be a cost to cursing. You need to realize and accept this, and if it’s not something you’re prepared to deal with, I’d suggest finding another way to get things done.

–Bree NicGarran

Revenge Curse Jar Spell

Intent: To bring bad luck into the life of one who has wronged you.
Timing: Waning moon
Supplies:

Clay poppet
Toothpicks, pins, or nails
Yarn or thread
Lemon juice
Glass jar
1 fresh egg
Black candle stub
Shovel

Go to a patch of earth at a crossroads that is not likely to be disturbed. Carve the target’s name into the poppet and say aloud:

Poppet, I name you [Name]. Your limbs are their limbs, your flesh is their flesh. As you suffer, so shall they suffer.

Stick toothpicks/pins/nails into the poppet. Accompany each one with a particular malady you would like the target to suffer. Bind the poppet’s limbs, eyes, and mouth to prevent escape and drop it into the jar. Add more pins or nails if desired.

Add lemon juice while saying,

As the juice destroys the flesh, so let your fortunes sour
Let the sweet be gone from your life forth from this very hour

Add the egg, while saying,

As the egg disintegrates, your luck begins to rot
Relief you will seek from my curse, but find it you will not

 

Light the black candle and drip the wax into the jar, while saying,

This candle flame doth represent my hurt, my rage, my ire
May all your fortune vanish, as kindling in a fire
(If desired, light a piece of paper with a list of wrongs. Add the ashes to the jar.)
May hardship come to find you with the waning of the moon
[Name], my curse upon you from now till crack of doom

Alternatively (if you just want to teach someone a lesson):

For all that you have angered me, my rage may yet relent
[Name], my curse upon you until you do repent

Drop the candle stub into the jar and shake well. Bury the jar and walk away without looking back. Once at home, bathe thoroughly with the intention of washing away any residual energy still clinging to you. Wash your clothes and tools as well.

–Bree NicGarran

Justice Spell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

1 Short Black Candle

Sharp Thing to Crave Person’s Name onto the Candle

Lighter or Matches

Candle Holder (TRIVIA: A candle holders proper name is CANDLE STICK)

SPELL:

I ask the Universe, the Great Spirit, The Great Mother, and The Great Father that the person who has caused me (fill in blank examples – physical, mental, or emotional hurt or pain, purposely caused you to lose money or a job, etc) gets the equivalent in this lifetime.

I do not want them to suffer any more than I am or any less than I am.

I do not ask for anything that will completely harm the person causing them to lose everything they own, their family or friends. But let their true nature be seen by their family, friends, business associates, and stranger they meet in any setting.

I ask that they become more considerate of other people, animals, Mother Earth, and anything else they come in contact with in anyway.

THESE ARE MY WORDS! THIS MY WILL! SO MOTE IT BE! A’Ho (A’ho comes from the Kiowa word aho (“thank you”). It spread in usage by the Native American Church ceremonies, and from use at Pow Wows. It’s use these days it is used for “I agree”, “Amen”, or “Yes.” But for every nation except the Kiowa it is a loan word. For the definition of other Native American Tribes and Nations  For more information on the phase A’Ho please click here.)

Copyright 2020 Lady Beltane

 

 

 

6 Famous Curses and Their Origins

Dig into the superstitions that surround King Tut’s tomb, the Hope Diamond and more.

Throughout history, people have promoted stories of curses for a variety of reasons. To sports fans, curses can help explain their favorite team’s loss. When a cause of death is misunderstood, curses can provide an explanation. For an imperial nation, curses can betray anxiety about being punished for colonizing and taking artifacts. And sometimes, curses come about because someone just wanted to make up a story.

Here are some prominent curses in history.

1. King Tut’s Curse (and Other ‘Mummy’s Curses’)

King Tut's Curse

The burial mask of Egyptian Pharaoh Tutankhamun.

Hannes Magerstaedt/Getty Images

In February 1923, a British archaeological team opened the tomb of Tutankhamun, or “King Tut,” an Egyptian pharaoh during the 14th century B.C. Two months later, when the team’s sponsor died from a bacterial infection, British newspapers claimed without evidence that he’d died because of “King Tut’s curse.” Whenever subsequent members of the team died, the media dredged up the alleged curse again.

King Tut’s curse and other famous “mummy’s curses” were invented by Europeans and Americans while their countries removed priceless artifacts from Egypt. After the Titanic sank in 1912, some newspapers even promoted a conspiracy theory that the ship had sunk because of a “mummy’s curse.”

READ MORE: The Craziest Titanic Conspiracy Theories, Explained

Though it’s not clear how many people actually took these “curses” seriously, these stories became extremely popular subjects for horror movies like The Mummy (1932) and its many iterations, as well as comedies like Mummy’s Boys (1936) and Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy (1955).

2. The Curse of the Polish King’s Tomb

Casimir IV Jagiellon, King of Poland

Casimir IV Jagiellon.

Heritage Images/Getty Images

In 1973, a group of archaeologists opened the tomb of the 15th-century Polish king Casimir IV Jagiellon in Kraków, Poland. As with the opening of King Tut’s tomb 50 years before, European media hyped up the event, and the researchers involved allegedly joked that they were risking a curse on the tomb by opening it.

When some of the team members began to die shortly after, some media outlets speculated it was due to a curse. Later, experts discovered traces of deadly fungi inside the tomb that can cause lung illnesses when breathed in. This was the cause of their deaths.

3. The Hope Diamond Curse

To read the rest of this article please click here….

The Hope Diamond, Evelyn Walsh McLean

Evelyn Walsh McLean, one of the owners of the famous Hope diamond, c. 1915.

Topical Press Agency/Getty Images

In the 1660s, the French gem dealer Jean-Baptiste Tavernier purchased a large diamond of unknown origin during a trip to India. Yet by the 20th century, a myth had sprung up in the United States and Europe that Tavernier had stolen the diamond from the statue of a Hindu goddess. The newspapers and jewelers who spread this story claimed the diamond was cursed and brought bad luck to those who owned it.

By 1839, the diamond supposedly ended up with Henry Philip Hope, a Dutch collector based in London and the source of the stone’s modern name—the Hope Diamond. Sometime after this, European and American newspapers began claiming that the Hope Diamond carried a curse.

The French jeweler Pierre Cartier reportedly used these stories to enhance the diamond’s value when he sold it to American heiress Evelyn Walsh McLean in the early 1910s. After she died, it went to a U.S. jewelry company, which exhibited it before donating it in 1958 to the Smithsonian Institution, where it remains today.

READ MORE: 8 of Halloween’s Most Hair-Raising Folk Legends 

5. The Curse of Tippecanoe (or Tecumseh’s Curse)

he Curse of Tippecanoe, Tecumseh’s Curse

The Battle of Tippecanoe, where General Harrison fought Tecumshe on Nov 7, 1811.

Glasshouse Vintage/Universal History Archive/Getty Images

In the mid-20th century, U.S. media began to note a pattern in presidential deaths. Starting with William Henry Harrison and ending with John F. Kennedy, every 20 years the country elected a president who would die in office.

Harrison, the first president to die in office, was elected in 1840. The other presidents who died in office include Abraham Lincoln, elected 1860 (and 1864); James A. Garfield, elected 1880; William McKinley, elected 1900; Warren G. Harding, elected 1920; Franklin D. Roosevelt, elected 1940 (as well as 1932, 1936 and 1944); and JFK, elected 1960. The only president between Harrison and JFK to fall outside of this pattern is Zachary Taylor, who was elected in 1848 and died in 1850.

In the 1930s, Ripley’s Believe It or Not claimed the “pattern” was due to a curse Shawnee Chief Tecumseh placed on Harrison and future presidents after Harrison’s troops defeated Tecumseh’s at the Battle of Tippecanoe in 1811. (Tecumseh died two years later in another battle against Harrison’s troops.) This story likely originated with non-Native Americans and bears a similarity to other “curses” in U.S. books and movies about disturbing Native burial grounds.

WATCH: Halloween Documentaries on HISTORY Vault

6. The Curse of Macbeth

There are lots of superstitions in the world of theatre. It’s bad luck to wish actors good luck, hence the reason people instead tell them to “break a leg.” And it’s also bad luck to say the word “Macbeth” in the theatre except during a performance of the Shakespeare play. Supposedly, this is because tragedy has historically befallen productions of the play. In reality, these stories are a mix of fabrication and selective evidence-picking.

The legend about the play seems to have started with Max Beerbohm, a British cartoonist and critic born in the 1870s, nearly three centuries after Macbeth’s first performance. Beerbohm—possibly annoyed that Macbeth was such a popular playmade up a story that the first actor cast to play Lady Macbeth died right before the play’s opening night.

Since then, this story has become part of a myth that the play is cursed and has brought bad luck to those involved with it. Though there have been real accidents during runs of Macbeth over its more than 400-year history, these accidents gain more attention than accidents during other plays because of the supposed “curse.”

READ MORE: Did Shakespeare Really Write His Own Plays?

7. The Billy Goat Curse on the Chicago Cubs

History of the Billy Goat Curse

 A fan pushes a goat in a cart outside of Wrigley Field before the start of the 2017 home opener against the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 10, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois.

Scott Olson/Getty Images

As with theatre, there are also a lot of superstitions in the world of sports. One of the most famous is the supposed “billy goat curse” on the Chicago Cubs.

In 1945, a tavern owner named William “Billy Goat” Sianis was reportedly prevented from bringing his pet goat, Murphy, into Chicago’s Wrigley Field to see the Cubs play the Detroit Tigers in the World Series. Supposedly, Sianis put a curse on the Cubs, saying they wouldn’t win this or any other World Series ever again.

Before this, the Cubs had only won the World Series twice before, in 1907 and 1908. When they lost the World Series in 1945, the curse gained credence. In 2016, when the Cubs won the world series for the first time in over a century, U.S. media promoted the idea that the curse was broken.

The billy goat curse is similar to the curse of the Bambino, which supposedly began when the Boston Red Sox traded Babe Ruth in 1919 and ended when the team won the World Series in 2004. There’s also rapper Lil B’s curse on Kevin Durant, which Lil B issued in a 2011 tweet and lifted in 2017 in another tweet. When the Golden State Warriors won the NBA finals that year with Durant earning MVP, sports media jokingly (or not?) proclaimed that Lil B had helped by lifting the curse.

WATCH: A new season of The Curse of Oak Island premieres Tuesday, November 10 at 9/8c on HISTORY. Watch a preview now.

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