Full Moon in Virgo

During the Full Moon in Virgo, we turn to the task of separating grain from the chaff, to bring the things in our lives to order. Virgo is the practical priestess—the healer—connected to archetype of the Virgin Goddess, Hestia, who teaches us the value of intentional solitude. Virgo medicine show us how to be discriminating and hone things down to their essentials. She is the solitary Witch in the forest who tends the herbs by the Moon. The one who knows that rituals of daily life are sacred, that the body is the temple, and that service in the spiritual practice. Now is the time to synthesize, refine, and make the things of our lives sound. To know just what medicine is required, to dispel illusion and see into the heart of the matter.

Hestia, help me sort the seeds. Help me know when it is time to harvest and when it is time to let something die on the vine. Show me the magic of a simple well-ordered life.

Guiding Goddesses: Hestia, Astrea, Frigg

Copyright by Danielle Blacwood in Llewellyn’s Witches’ Datebook 2020 Page 55

FULL MOON AND NEW MOON CALENDAR FOR 2020

This Full Moon and New Moon calendar lists all Full and New Moons for 2020 with exact times in UTC. For more details and exact times in your location click on each months listing

Full Moon and New Moon Calendar
January » Full Moon
Jan 10, 2020
19:21 UTC
New Moon
Jan 24, 2020
21:42 UTC
February » Full Moon
Feb 9, 2020
07:33 UTC
New Moon
Feb 23, 2020
15:32 UTC
March » Full Moon
Mar 9, 2020
17:47 UTC
New Moon
Mar 24, 2020
09:28 UTC
April » Full Moon
Apr 8, 2020
02:35 UTC
New Moon
Apr 23, 2020
02:25 UTC
May » Full Moon
May 7, 2020
10:45 UTC
New Moon
May 22, 2020
17:38 UTC
June » Full Moon
Jun 5, 2020
19:12 UTC
New Moon
Jun 21, 2020
06:41 UTC
July » Full Moon
Jul 5, 2020
04:44 UTC
New Moon
Jul 20, 2020
17:33 UTC
August » Full Moon
Aug 3, 2020
15:59 UTC
New Moon
Aug 19, 2020
02:41 UTC
September » Full Moon
Sep 2, 2020
05:22 UTC
New Moon
Sep 17, 2020
11:00 UTC
October » Full Moon
Oct 1, 2020
21:05 UTC
New Moon
Oct 16, 2020
19:31 UTC
Full Moon
Oct 31, 2020
14:49 UTC
November » New Moon
Nov 15, 2020
05:07 UTC
Full Moon
Nov 30, 2020
09:30 UTC
December » New Moon
Dec 14, 2020
16:16 UTC
Full Moon
Dec 30, 2020
03:28 UTC

Humans have a strong affinity for the moon. It’s waxing and waning has formed the basis for calendars across continents and cultures. Almanacs charted full moons so farmers could work by its light. The full moon has been affiliated with harvests, festivals, wolves, and insanity. The very word “lunacy” stems from people’s ideas of mental stability and the moon’s phases. Full moons have captured imaginations across cultures and time, and many cultures have named the various full moons. 2020 is notable in that it will not have twelve full moons, but thirteen. The thirteenth full moon is called a blue moon. About every nineteen years, the opposite occurs, in that February will not have a full moon. This is referred to as a black moon. Each moon of the year has its own name and connotations depending on the season.

January’s full moon is often referred to as the Wolf Moon. It can also be called the Moon after Yule, in reference to the pagan holiday of Yule supplanted by Christmas. The early Catholic Church incorporated pagan holidays into their calendar to help conversion, which is why they coincide with holidays like Yule or solstice celebrations. February’s moon is usually called a Snow Moon since it tends to snow a lot in February. Some Native American tribes call it a Hunger Moon due to scarce food supplies.

March’s full moon is called the Worm Moon to signify the return of earthworms in the winter thaw as the season’s transition. Many names are attributed to March’s moon, such Crow Moon, Sap Moon for maple syrup season, and the old Anglo-Saxon term Lenten Moon. As the name implies, the Lenten Moon is the only full moon to occur during Lent. Continuing the Easter theme, an old Anglo-Saxon term for April’s full moon was Paschal Moon, in reference to the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The more common name for April’s moon in modern times is Pink Moon, as pink phlox flowers bloom that month.

Whereas April’s moon is for one flower, May’s full moon is called the Flower Moon to signify the massive bloom following April’s rainfall. The less romantic but more practical Corn Planting Moon is another name. As mentioned earlier, farmers like full moons because they can work under its light if the sky is clear. June is called the Strawberry Moon as that month is the peak of the season. Mead Moon is another name, as fermenting started earlier in the year to produce a proper drink. Continuing the new season’s growth, July is often called Buck Moon because male deer’s antlers start growing around this time. Since July often has many thunderstorms, Thunder Moon is another term for July’s full moon.

August, the last full month of summer, has many names related to food and bounty. The Algonquin tribes called it Sturgeon Moon as the lakes filled with fish. The Anglo-Saxons called it the Grain Moon, and some called it the Barley Moon or Green Corn Moon. The importance of the harvest and it’s relation to the moons grows stronger in the autumn. September’s moon is called the Corn Moon, though the Farmer’s Almanac used to refer to it as the Harvest Moon based on the Anglo-Saxon term.

In modern times, the Harvest Moon is in October, and in fact this happens every three years because the Harvest Moon is based on the equinox, not the calendar. Hunter’s Moon is the term for October’s full moon otherwise, since it’s prime hunting season and the time when northern peoples would stock up on meat for the winter. In 2020, the Blue Moon will occur on Halloween, making it even more extraordinary for moon fans.

To end the year, November is often called the Beaver Moon as beavers tend to be the most active in that month. It can also be called the Frost Moon since frost starts to form at night. If November’s full moon is the last before the winter solstice, it is called the Mourning Moon. Winter is often considered a season of death due to the migration of wildlife and trees bereft of leaves. December is aptly called the Cold Moon since winter starts in that month. The Anglo-Saxons once called the full moon the Moon before Yule, in reference to the holiday occurring around the winter solstice as mentioned before. It can also be called the Oak Moon, though this term can also apply to November. Either way, the history of the full moon’s names is long and spans many cultures and traditions.

From Moongiant.com

You can use this link to go forward or backward in time for Moon phase information. If you are curious you can even find out what phase the Moon was in when you or anyone else you know was on the date the person was born.

JANUARY FULL MOON

The very first full moon of the year is known in many cultures as the Full Wolf Moon, which is appropriate given the deep, ancient ties between wolves and January’s full moon. For instance, the Gaelic word for January, Faoilleach, comes from the term for wolves, faol-chù, even though wolves haven’t existed in Scotland for centuries. The Saxon word for January is Wulf-monath, or Wolf Month. Meanwhile, the festival of the Japanese wolf god, Ooguchi Magami, is held in January. The Seneca tribe links the wolf so strongly to the moon, they believe that a wolf gave birth to the moon by singing it into the sky. Just why are wolves so strongly associated with January’s full moon?

JANUARY FULL MOON CALENDAR
2020 » January 10
2:21 pm EST
January 10
19:21 UTC
2021 » January 28
2:16 pm EST
January 28
19:16 UTC
2022 » January 17
6:48 pm EST
January 17
23:48 UTC
2023 » January 6
6:08 pm EST
January 6
23:08 UTC

The most obvious answer is because wolves are much louder and more noticeable in January, which is when breeding season begins. Wolves begin to howl more frequently and aggressively to establish their territory, threatening neighbors and enemies alike to stay far away from their breeding grounds. A small pack of wolves may even try to make themselves seem like a larger pack by howling together. While a lone wolf can sustain a howl for the duration of a single breath, an entire pack may howl in unison for longer than two minutes during breeding season.

While it makes sense for the haunting howls of wolves to be more memorable during January, how did wolves come to be associated with the full moon itself? Everyone is familiar with the iconic image of a wolf raising its head and howling at the full moon – but do wolves actually sing to the moon? While that might be a romantic idea, there’s no scientific evidence that links wolves to the lunar cycle. Humans may have begun to associate wolves with the moon simpy because they are nocturnal animals that are very active at night. In addition, wolves do raise their heads in the direction of the sky so their howls can travel over far distances to reach their pack mates as they roam. Instead of singing to the moon, they’re actually singing to their friends.

In fact, wolves are so well-known for their tight-knit communities that the Sioux tribe called January’s full moon the Moon Where Wolves Run Together. The wolf is often seen as a symbol of loyalty and protection in many cultures. The Wolf Moon is the perfect time for you to reach out to loved ones and reaffirm your connections, in preparation for deepening your bonds and taking on new challenges together over the upcoming year.

That said, lone wolves are also entirely capable of overcoming hostile conditions on their own with their resourcefulness. According to Celtic mythology, the wolf is infused with lunar power, which refers to its ability to sniff out hidden insights or knowledge, and to detect unexpected sources of danger. In some legends, the wolf even swallows the sun so the wolf can bask in the moon’s overflowing lunar power! The Full Wolf Moon is a great time for you to plan out clever ways to achieve your goals for the upcoming year. Trust your wolfish instincts when it comes to decisions, but also be tenacious in searching for useful knowledge that will help you realize your masterplan.

January Full Moon

From Moongiant.com

You can use this link to go forward or backward in time for Moon phase information. If you are curious you can even find out what phase the Moon was in when you or anyone else you know was on the date the person was born.

FULL MOON AND NEW MOON CALENDAR from MoonGiant.com

This Full Moon and New Moon calendar lists all Full and New Moons for 2020 with exact times in UTC. For more details and exact times in your location click on each months listing.

Full Moon and New Moon Calendar
January » Full Moon
Jan 10, 2020
19:21 UTC
New Moon
Jan 24, 2020
21:42 UTC
February » Full Moon
Feb 9, 2020
07:33 UTC
New Moon
Feb 23, 2020
15:32 UTC
March » Full Moon
Mar 9, 2020
17:47 UTC
New Moon
Mar 24, 2020
09:28 UTC
April » Full Moon
Apr 8, 2020
02:35 UTC
New Moon
Apr 23, 2020
02:25 UTC
May » Full Moon
May 7, 2020
10:45 UTC
New Moon
May 22, 2020
17:38 UTC
June » Full Moon
Jun 5, 2020
19:12 UTC
New Moon
Jun 21, 2020
06:41 UTC
July » Full Moon
Jul 5, 2020
04:44 UTC
New Moon
Jul 20, 2020
17:33 UTC
August » Full Moon
Aug 3, 2020
15:59 UTC
New Moon
Aug 19, 2020
02:41 UTC
September » Full Moon
Sep 2, 2020
05:22 UTC
New Moon
Sep 17, 2020
11:00 UTC
October » Full Moon
Oct 1, 2020
21:05 UTC
New Moon
Oct 16, 2020
19:31 UTC
Full Moon
Oct 31, 2020
14:49 UTC
November » New Moon
Nov 15, 2020
05:07 UTC
Full Moon
Nov 30, 2020
09:30 UTC
December » New Moon
Dec 14, 2020
16:16 UTC
Full Moon
Dec 30, 2020
03:28 UTC

Humans have a strong affinity for the moon. It’s waxing and waning has formed the basis for calendars across continents and cultures. Almanacs charted full moons so farmers could work by its light. The full moon has been affiliated with harvests, festivals, wolves, and insanity. The very word “lunacy” stems from people’s ideas of mental stability and the moon’s phases. Full moons have captured imaginations across cultures and time, and many cultures have named the various full moons. 2020 is notable in that it will not have twelve full moons, but thirteen. The thirteenth full moon is called a blue moon. About every nineteen years, the opposite occurs, in that February will not have a full moon. This is referred to as a black moon. Each moon of the year has its own name and connotations depending on the season.

January’s full moon is often referred to as the Wolf Moon. It can also be called the Moon after Yule, in reference to the pagan holiday of Yule supplanted by Christmas. The early Catholic Church incorporated pagan holidays into their calendar to help conversion, which is why they coincide with holidays like Yule or solstice celebrations. February’s moon is usually called a Snow Moon since it tends to snow a lot in February. Some Native American tribes call it a Hunger Moon due to scarce food supplies.

March’s full moon is called the Worm Moon to signify the return of earthworms in the winter thaw as the season’s transition. Many names are attributed to March’s moon, such Crow Moon, Sap Moon for maple syrup season, and the old Anglo-Saxon term Lenten Moon. As the name implies, the Lenten Moon is the only full moon to occur during Lent. Continuing the Easter theme, an old Anglo-Saxon term for April’s full moon was Paschal Moon, in reference to the death, burial, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The more common name for April’s moon in modern times is Pink Moon, as pink phlox flowers bloom that month.

Whereas April’s moon is for one flower, May’s full moon is called the Flower Moon to signify the massive bloom following April’s rainfall. The less romantic but more practical Corn Planting Moon is another name. As mentioned earlier, farmers like full moons because they can work under its light if the sky is clear. June is called the Strawberry Moon as that month is the peak of the season. Mead Moon is another name, as fermenting started earlier in the year to produce a proper drink. Continuing the new season’s growth, July is often called Buck Moon because male deer’s antlers start growing around this time. Since July often has many thunderstorms, Thunder Moon is another term for July’s full moon.

August, the last full month of summer, has many names related to food and bounty. The Algonquin tribes called it Sturgeon Moon as the lakes filled with fish. The Anglo-Saxons called it the Grain Moon, and some called it the Barley Moon or Green Corn Moon. The importance of the harvest and it’s relation to the moons grows stronger in the autumn. September’s moon is called the Corn Moon, though the Farmer’s Almanac used to refer to it as the Harvest Moon based on the Anglo-Saxon term.

In modern times, the Harvest Moon is in October, and in fact this happens every three years because the Harvest Moon is based on the equinox, not the calendar. Hunter’s Moon is the term for October’s full moon otherwise, since it’s prime hunting season and the time when northern peoples would stock up on meat for the winter. In 2020, the Blue Moon will occur on Halloween, making it even more extraordinary for moon fans.

To end the year, November is often called the Beaver Moon as beavers tend to be the most active in that month. It can also be called the Frost Moon since frost starts to form at night. If November’s full moon is the last before the winter solstice, it is called the Mourning Moon. Winter is often considered a season of death due to the migration of wildlife and trees bereft of leaves. December is aptly called the Cold Moon since winter starts in that month. The Anglo-Saxons once called the full moon the Moon before Yule, in reference to the holiday occurring around the winter solstice as mentioned before. It can also be called the Oak Moon, though this term can also apply to November. Either way, the history of the full moon’s names is long and spans many cultures and traditions.

2020 Printable Full Moon Calendar and Some Information For Each One

History of Friday the 13th

Long considered a harbinger of bad luck, Friday the 13th has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise and not one but two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia—that describe fear of this supposedly unlucky day.

The Fear of 13

Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.

The Thirteen Club

In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. ArthurGrover ClevelandBenjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson.

The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

What bad things happened on Friday 13th?

On Friday, October 13, 1307, officers of King Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar, a powerful religious and military order formed in the 12th century for the defense of the Holy Land.

Imprisoned on charges of various illegal behaviors (but really because the king wanted access to their financial resources), many Templars were later executed. Some cite the link with the Templars as the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition, but like many legends involving the Templars and their history, the truth remains murky.

In more recent times, a number of traumatic events have occurred on Friday the 13th, including the German bombing of Buckingham Palace(September 1940); the murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens, New York (March 1964); a cyclone that killed more than 300,000 people in Bangladesh (November 1970); the disappearance of a Chilean Air Force plane in the Andes (October 1972); the death of rapper Tupac Shakur (September 1996) and the crash of the Costa Concordia cruise ship off the coast of Italy, which killed 30 people (January 2012).

Sources

“The Origins of Unlucky Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Friday the 13th: why is it unlucky and other facts about the worst day in the calendar,” The Telegraph.
“13 Freaky Things That Happened on Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Here’s Why Friday the 13th is Considered Unlucky,” Time.
“Friggatriskaidekaphobes Need Not Apply,” New-York Historical Society.

There’s a Full Moon Due on Friday the 13th for Most of the U.S. The Next One Isn’t for Another 30 Years

Time Magazine September 12, 2019

BY GINA MARTINEZ

The next full moon is set to make an appearance on the most ominous date on the calendar this month.

A September full moon, also known as a “Harvest Moon,” will be visible to many Americans this Friday the 13th.

According to NASA, the moon will be full early Saturday morning, Sept. 14, at 12:33 a.m. EST, but for those who live in the Central, Mountain and Pacific time zones, the full moon will be visible shortly before midnight on Friday the 13th.

NASA says that the moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time — from Thursday night through Sunday morning.

To read the rest Friday 13, 2019

JUNE’S FULL MOON

The sweetest full moon of the year is June’s full moon, commonly known as the Full Strawberry Moon. While the full moon itself is inedible, despite how round and delicious it may seem, the Full Strawberry Moon marks strawberry harvesting season in North America. Most Algonquin tribes understood that it was a sign that wild strawberries were starting to ripen and ready for the harvest. Delicious though ripe strawberries may be, June’s full moon has another name that’s even sweeter.

What could possibly be sweeter than strawberries? Try honey. In Europe, June’s full moon was actually known as the Honey Moon. Other European names for it included the Hot Moon, signifiying the beginning of hot summer days, or Hay Moon, because of the first hay harvest. Those names aside, European names for the Full Strawberry Moon overall tend to have sweet, romantic connotations – a good example is the name Full Rose Moon. June’s full moon is also called Mead Moon, which could refer to the mowing of meadows during summer, but there’s another more romantic interpretation as well.

In Europe, it’s traditional to gift mead or honey to a newlywed couple during their first moon of marriage. The name Honey Moon itself has now become a common word in the English language, used to refer to the honeymoon holiday that couples go on right after they’re married. It used to be that newlyweds in ancient Europe would go on a sweet romantic holiday around the time of June’s full moon, because the moon phases were seen as a symbol for the phases of a marriage, with the full moon signifying the fullest and happiest part, the wedding itself.

The Full Strawberry Moon is tied to romance and marital bliss all around the world. In India, for example, June’s full moon is celebrated as Vat Purnima, where married women perform a ceremonial ritual to show their love for their husbands. Vat Purnima is based off a legend from the Mahabharata, about a beautiful woman, Savitri, who is determined to save her husband, Satyavan, who is doomed to die an early death. Savitri fasts for three days before Satyavan dies, upon which she successfully negotiates with the King of Hell for the resurrection of her husband. Similarly, married women nowadays dress up in beautiful saris, fast, and tie a thread around a banyan tree seven times to wish that their husbands will lead long, happy lives.
It is no wonder, then, that the Pagans also call June’s full moon the Lovers’ Moon. This is an excellent time to work on the connections in your life, romantic or otherwise, by showing affection to your loved ones and allowing yourself to be vulnerable to encourage intimacy in your relationships. During this Honey Moon, some Hoodoo practitioners will even use honey in magic rituals to sweeten other people’s feelings towards the practitioner. An example of a sweetening ritual is to pour honey into a saucer containing the target’s name, before lighting a candle on top of it. Another example of a honey ritual is to tie two poppets together with honey between them, in order to heal a broken relationship between two people. Honey rituals aside, true magic may happen when you invest your time and effort during this month to work on your relationships and appreciate the love you have in your life.

MoonGiant.com – Major Cities Full Moon Time