A Little Humor for Your Day – Keeping Summoned Beings as Pets is a Bad Idea

Keeping Summoned Beings as Pets is a Bad Idea

 

Why keeping summoned beings as pets is a bad idea…

They may be cute and cuddly when they’re little, but they tend to grow. Fast. To something large.

You can’t flush your overgrown summoned pet down the toilet and no pound will take one. (Trust me on this one. )

Unless you spay or neuter them, they will breed, quickly.

Good luck trying to find a vet that will spay or neuter one…

The feeding costs are astronomical. New Age shops are very expensive. Oh, sorry, I meant “astrological”.

An exotic summoned pet is very difficult to feed. Museums start suspecting your interests in ancient cultures rather quickly.

Getting them used to gourmet food is a bad idea: there aren’t that many virgins around, you see!

Cats sitting on the chest of a sleeping child sucking their life-force out may be a myth. With summoned pets, it isn’t.

No insurance will cover it if your summoned pet bites your guests.

They may even eat your guests while you pop into the kitchen for tea.

When they nibble your toes on Sunday morning, it does NOT feel nice. Besides, you need those toes for proper balance.

Clipping their toenails to save your sofa from being torn into shreds is pretty damn hard.

You think a pet stealing your stuff is bad? Summoned pets steal your stuff and hide it to the astral plane!

Summoned pet dung is difficult to get rid of. They won’t accept it at the toxic waste plant anymore …

Cat’s hairballs are easy to clean away. Try dealing with astral slime puke.

They don’t stay in their cage unless you remember to seal it magickally properly. Every single time.

It also gets a bit tedious to keep that triangle of salt intact in the corner of the living room.

A summoned pet possessing your grandmother is NO fun, I can tell you!

A summoned pet possessing your stereo system may be painful.

Having them play with your altar tools is not cute.

Having them play with your Book of Shadows is even less cute.

Smell of sulfur wafting in the apartment tends to deter Jehovah’s Witnesses and other pests, though… But it does make breathing labored in the long run.

Landlords tend to dislike the “things that go bump in the night” routine you have going on in your flat.

Landlords will detest finding out that paying residents in your block are disappearing as if by magick.

On the other hand, the police may become a tad too interested in the very same phenomena.

It’s not fun to have your pet deciding to “hump” your neighbor’s dog in the middle of your daily walk.

It’s practically impossible to find new, caring homes for the resulting Cerberoses, too.

While it may be cute to have a pet that actually does talk back to you, it’s not nice when they start throwing curses.

It may be nice to have a pet that can retrieve your e-mail along with regular post, but it’s NOT fun having them actually posting replies…

Advanced summoned pets may summon pets of their own. That means BIG trouble.

Last but not least: If you’re not quite careful, you may one day wake up realizing that it is in fact YOU who are the pet in this deal.

 

By  Faerie K.

Website: Ecauldron.com

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A Little Humor for Your Day – Keeping Summoned Beings as Pets is a Bad Idea

Keeping Summoned Beings as Pets is a Bad Idea

They may be cute and cuddly when they’re little, but they tend to grow. Fast. To something large.

You can’t flush your overgrown summoned pet down the toilet and no pound will take one. (Trust me on this one. )

Unless you spay or neuter them, they will breed, quickly.

Good luck trying to find a vet that will spay or neuter one…

The feeding costs are astronomical. New Age shops are very expensive. Oh, sorry, I meant “astrological”.

An exotic summoned pet is very difficult to feed. Museums start suspecting your interests in ancient cultures rather quickly.

Getting them used to gourmet food is a bad idea: there aren’t that many virgins around, you see!

Cats sitting on the chest of a sleeping child sucking their life-force out may be a myth. With summoned pets, it isn’t.

No insurance will cover it if your summoned pet bites your guests.

They may even eat your guests while you pop into the kitchen for tea.

When they nibble your toes on Sunday morning, it does NOT feel nice. Besides, you need those toes for proper balance.

Clipping their toenails to save your sofa from being torn into shreds is pretty damn hard.

You think a pet stealing your stuff is bad? Summoned pets steal your stuff and hide it to the astral plane!

Summoned pet dung is difficult to get rid of. They won’t accept it at the toxic waste plant anymore …

Cat’s hairballs are easy to clean away. Try dealing with astral slime puke.

They don’t stay in their cage unless you remember to seal it magickally properly. Every single time.

It also gets a bit tedious to keep that triangle of salt intact in the corner of the living room.

A summoned pet possessing your grandmother is NO fun, I can tell you!

A summoned pet possessing your stereo system may be painful.

Having them play with your altar tools is not cute.

Having them play with your Book of Shadows is even less cute.

Smell of sulfur wafting in the apartment tends to deter Jehovah’s Witnesses and other pests, though… But it does make breathing labored in the long run.

Landlords tend to dislike the “things that go bump in the night” routine you have going on in your flat.

Landlords will detest finding out that paying residents in your block are disappearing as if by magick.

On the other hand, the police may become a tad too interested in the very same phenomena.

It’s not fun to have your pet deciding to “hump” your neighbor’s dog in the middle of your daily walk.

It’s practically impossible to find new, caring homes for the resulting Cerberoses, too.

While it may be cute to have a pet that actually does talk back to you, it’s not nice when they start throwing curses.

It may be nice to have a pet that can retrieve your e-mail along with regular post, but it’s NOT fun having them actually posting replies…

Advanced summoned pets may summon pets of their own. That means BIG trouble.

Last but not least: If you’re not quite careful, you may one day wake up realizing that it is in fact YOU who are the pet in this deal.

 

Source:
by Faerie K.
Website: The Cauldron, A Pagan Forum

Over the Moon Spell

Over the Moon Spell

Most everyone is familiar with the nursery rhyme: “Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle, the cow jumped over the moon; the little dog laughed to see such sport, and the dish ran away with the spoon.” Cast this spell to empower your bond with your pet.

For this spell, you will need your cat or dog, lavender essential oil, and a few drops of lemon juice.

After dark sit with your pet so you can see the night sky. Say the nursery rhyme to your cat or dog. Sit quietly together for a few minutes. Rub behind his or her ears. Tell your pet how much she or he means to you, how much your pet is appreciated. Say three times:

Blessed be (say your pet’s name)

Thank you for your loving company.

Now, pour a few drops of lavender essential oil and a few drops of lemon juice into your hand and rub it onto your cat’s or dog’s fur. Don’t get this mixture near your pet’s head, mouth, nose or eyes. As you rub say quickly (because your pet will take off like a rocket once she or he gets scent of the lavender oil):

May the God and Goddess protect and bless you always!

Herbal Healing for Pets

Herbal Healing for Pets

I will begin by stating that you should not attempt herbal healing for your pet unless you have a good understanding of what is ailing your pet. And a good understanding of the healing herbs. Don’t guess…..check with a veterinarian first! There are now a lot of holistic/natural vets out there – call around and see who you can find. This advice is not meant to replace the diagnosis and advice of a licensed veterinarian. That said, I will share with you the herbal treatments that we use on my ranch. Most are simple, safe, and effective.

Remember first and always that cats and dogs and other small creatures have much shorter digestive systems than us human caretakers. Fresh herbs are not digested as they are in humans. Therefore, the tincture form of an herb will work better for them. An acceptable alternative would be a stronger herbal tea than you would use for yourself. Doses need to be compatible with your pet’s weight – small amounts for small animals, larger amounts for large animals. When in doubt, consult a holistic or natural healing veterinarian. Administering several doses throughout the day, rather than one big dose once a day will speed the herbs into your pet’s system and boost the immune system much faster. And as with ourselves, no herb should be given to any animal on a continuous basis. Like us, their bodies will begin to build an immunity, and once that happens, that herb becomes useless medicinally.

A good rule of thumb for any herbal remedy for your pet is two weeks on, one week off. That gives the body time to work on its own, and gives you time to determine if the herbal treatment needs to be continued. There are exceptions to this rule, as with all rules, as in herbs that take a while to build up in the body to be effective. Don’t give herbs you wouldn’t take yourself, internally or externally. Just about any herbal remedy that you use for yourself can be adapted for use for your pet – just remember to use tinctures whenever possible, stronger teas when necessary.

For overall general good health, as with ourselves, you should of course look to diet. There are many natural diets being recommended today for all sorts of pets. Do a little research, or preferably a lot, into the natural dietary needs of your pet. Raw meat added to the diet of a cat or dog, natural carnivores, can often clear up a lot of mysterious ailments, as can the addition of fruits and vegetables. If you feed a commercial diet, feed the best you can afford, and add to it when you can. Years of healthy life can be added to your pet when diet is properly looked after!

When you are changing your pet’s diet, do so gradually. Add one new item at a time, and space out those additions. That way if there is a negative reaction, you can quickly pinpoint the culprit. Not every food agrees with every animal.

Sunlight is also necessary for the health of your pet. Sunlight helps the body convert the nutrients in the foods you feed into the necessities for their systems. In place of sunlight, use full-spectrum lighting, like Vita-Lites, or an equivalent. These are ideal for your indoor pets, such as birds, reptiles and amphibians.

Here are some herbal remedies for those common problems:

Eyes:

A strong tea of eyebright, used as a wash, is perfect for irritated eyes on all pets. Also administer orally to boost the internal mechanisms to fight infection from the inside. Alternatively, you can make a saline solution. Dissolve 1/8 teaspoon of sea salt in 1/2 cup boiling water. Add 1 drop of goldenseal extract to 1 tablespoon of the saline solution, once cooled, when you are going to use it….it shrinks swollen tissues and disinfects.

Itching:

The common cause of itching is due to fleas and flea bites – some animals are actually allergic to the flea bites, compounding the problem. Brewer’s yeast is often recommended, 1 teaspoon or tablet per day, as a deterrent. A word of caution here – some animals are allergic to the brewer’s yeast, or react to it with dry patches of skin that itch just as bad as the fleas do. If you use brewer’s yeast, keep an eye out for these sorts of skin problems to develop, and discontinue the brewer’s yeast if necessary as soon as one of these symptoms appear. A good remedy for those dry itchy skin patches is tea tree oil, rubbed over the patch. The bitter taste will discourage the animal from digging at his skin, and the oil works well to heal the dryness. Do not use it near the eyes or genitals, however. Aloe is also good for those dry patches. Another method is to put a slice of raw cucumber over the “hot” spot, holding it there for a few minutes, and then rub aloe or tea tree oil over the area.

The shampoo you use, or the flea collar you use, may actually be causing the itching. Bathe the animal in an all natural shampoo, preferably something that has aloe in it, and find an alternative to that flea collar!! Would you wear chemicals around your neck? Neither should they!

You can make an herbal dip for your pet as follows: 2 cups packed fresh peppermint, pennyroyal, or rosemary; 1 quart boiling water; 4 quarts warm water – – Prepare an infusion by pouring the boiling water over the herbs and allow it to steep for 30 minutes. Strain the liquid and dilute it with the warm water. Saturate the animal’s coat thoroughly with the solution, allowing it to air dry. Use at the first sign of flea activity. This remedy will need to be repeated everthree to four days, but it is totally safe.

If the itching persists, and fleas or poor diet are not the culprit, use a mixture of Licorice Root, Dandelion Root, and Cat’s Claw in equal drops of each tincture for two weeks. The licorice is a natural cortisone, and will help to jumpstart the immune system.

To get rid of fleas in your carpet, after removing pets from the room, sprinkle Borax over the carpet and rub it in. Wait a while, then vacuum as usual. This is a safe, non-chemical method of flea control. Reapply the Borax once a week until the problem is gone.

Cuts:

Fresh aloe is an excellent application for those strange cuts and scrapes we can never figure out how our pet got. It is a natural antiseptic, and will keep the area moist until the cut can heal. Alternatively, you can clean the wound with a wash of goldenseal, and apply aloe or other herbal treatments that are your favorites.

Abscesses:

First you must lance the abscess. I mix a betadine solution with water until it looks like tea, and then fill an eyedropper with the solution and squirt it into the hole. Do this several times per day, at least three. The important thing is to clip the fur away from the abscess and don’t cover it with any bandage, or it can’t drain properly. It has to heal from the inside out. If it is extremely deep, you may need a vet to put a drain in it. I also begin to administer antibiotic herbs orally, to help fight any infection that may occur. Another course of action is to use chamomile in the wound to prevent infection. I have had a lot of success with these methods, which my vet recommends. However, I also know that if it doesn’t begin to clear up within a week, I need professional help to combat the infection.

Carsickness:

Does your pet get carsick when you take him for trips? Try giving a few drops of ginger root extract prior to the trip to settle his tummy. If it is a long trip, you may want to administer the ginger again halfway through the trip.

Infections:

Give a tincture of equal drops of echinacea and goldenseal. If the illness persists after two weeks, try a combination of different herbal antibiotics after careful diagnosis by your vet. If the animal recovers quickly, continue giving the herbs for a few days after, to aid in healing completely.

I generally give a capsule of garlic oil in the food once per week. It helps keep the biting insect critters away, and helps keep the immune system healthy.

Dehydration:

When a pet is dehydrated, due to illness or injury, you can give them Pedialyte, available in the baby food section of any grocery store. Alternatively, you can substitute Gatorade. However, the sugar content in Gatorade is rather high, which is not good for long term use with our pets. If using it, cut it in half with plain water. There are also powdered electrolyte solutions available in most feed stores that work just as well, and are less expensive. Electrolyte solutions given in place of water for the first 24 hours will also help new pets that were shipped to deal with the stress of shipping. This is especially important with reptiles, amphibians, and birds of all types.

Ulcers:

If your pet is suffering from ulcers, give him two drops each of Calendula, Comfrey, Knotgrass, and Nettle twice per day. Couple this with a bland, easy to digest diet until the ulcer has healed.

Anxiety, Stress:

When your pet suffers from stress or anxiety, try a combination of the extracts of Oats, Valerian, and Chamomile. Rub a little lavendar oil near the animal’s muzzle, or place some on a cotton pad in the pet’s bed or in his sleeping area. And remember that if you are stressed, the animal will be too, so sniff a little of that calming lavendar for yourself as well.

Orphans:

To raise an orphan, first find some goat milk – the fresher the better – to use as the replacement for mother’s milk. Goat milk is high in butterfat content, and is infinitely better to use than those powdered replacements found in stores, and miles ahead of cow’s milk. This applies for human babies, as well. Many a colicky baby has had their stomach soothed with goat milk…..and goat milk is usually easily used by those considered lactose-intolerant. Goat milk can be found in your health food store, and often in your grocery store, but the very best source is of course directly from the goat. Find a dairy goat farmer in your area. The prices will be better, too! We have raised everything from puppies and kittens to colts and calves on goat’s milk, and have observed or experienced none of the weight-gain problems or vitamin deficiency or immune deficiencies that occur often when using substitutes. Remember to feed the milk warmed. For puppies and kittens, it is often helpful to rub the face and anal area with a warm swab, to stimulate their system, much as the mother does after the baby feeds from her. Once per day, add a little spirulina (powdered) to the milk. It boosts the immune system, so needed in orphaned babies, and provides many necessary vitamins and nutrients.

Pregnancy:

Raspberry leaf administered daily throughout a pet’s pregnancy (mammals) will help tone the uterus and aid in the healing of the uterus after birth, as well as help to stimulate milk production in the mammaries.

Diarrhea, vomiting:

Powdered slippery elm bark is useful for treating diarrhea, vomiting, and sensitive stomachs for pets.

Shiny Coats:

One teaspoon (less for very small animals, such as ferrets) of cod liver oil dribbled over the pet’s food once or twice per week will give a thick, shiny coat, as well as provide many nutrients needed by your pet’s body.

Bee Pollen:

1/4 teaspoon for every 15 pounds of animal, given two to three times weekly, helps to slow the aging process. It will also restore hormone balances, regulate the digestive tract, and calm the symptoms of common allergies. Give bee pollen daily during times of stress, illness, or disease to give a boost to the body.

Vitamin C:

Giving 1000 mg to 2000 mg per day for three months to puppies from large breeds can help prevent hip dysplacia. Give 500 mg to 1000 mg daily to ease arthritis in dogs and cats. 500 mg each day can prevent urinary tract symptoms and problems for cats.

A WORD OF CAUTION:

Do not give white willow to cats or kittens. Many felines are allergic to salycin, the active ingredient in both white willow and the drug that is derived from it, aspirin. Substitute meadowsweet as a pain reliever instead.

 

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When Your Pet is More Than A Pet – Familiars and Avatars

When Your Pet is More Than A Pet – Familiars and Avatars

Author:   Bronwen Forbes   

As a prologue to this, you need to know that Herne has been my patron God since I was nine years old. You don’t need to know, but you’ll probably figure out by reading this (if you haven’t already) that sometimes I’m a little slow to notice the obvious.

A few months after adopting my red and white beagle mix Herman, I was trying to sleep in one Saturday morning when I began to idly wonder, “There are so many Goddesses with dogs as part of their symbolism. I wonder what Gods are associated with dogs, too?” And then it hit me like a two-by-four to the forehead. Herne, Lord of the Wild Hunt, is very much associated with dogs, especially red and white hunting dogs, than you very much. (I warned you I’m a little slow sometimes) .

Needless to say, sleep was no longer an option. I sat up and looked at Herman (who had spent the night, as he usually did, asnooze at my side) who was already staring at me with a definite, “took you long enough to figure it out” expression.

And just like that, I not only had a familiar, I had an avatar.

I’m defining “avatar” here not as a recent hit movie or a small picture that represents you on various blogs or discussion boards, but as the earthly representative of a deity. And for the love of me, I hadn’t a clue what to do with mine.

Four months later, we adopted a German Shepherd mix named Katie – and lo and behold, she was also what my husband likes to call a “God-touched” dog. But unlike Herman who was also my familiar (notice the past tense; I still miss him) , Katie let us know pretty quickly that she had no interest whatsoever in being my husband’s familiar, but would happily attend her Goddess Nehelennia’s tasks of safe travel, healing and commerce. Period.

Since acquiring Herman and Katie in 2001, I’ve alao gotten the clue what to do, not just for my special dogs, but for anyone else who may wake up one morning and see deity shining through the eyes of their pet.

First and foremost, and I know this sounds obvious, you have to keep treating your pet like a, well, pet. Your animal companion is your spiritual and or magickal support (familiar) or a little bit of deity (avatar) but he still needs proper food and water, adequate shelter, regular veterinary checkups, exercise, training, vaccinations, etc. After all, it’s not like the Gods can or will take care of your pet for you.

But once the regular, responsible pet ownership duties are taken care of with your familiar or avatar, there are still some things you need to think about to keep your relationship with your animal companion – and your deity – as smooth and fulfilling as possible.

1. Remember that, despite her spiritual role in your life, your pet is still going to act like an animal. Herman used to drive me crazy with this. He was a daily reminder of my relationship with my patron deity, helped me work through some serious ritual issues, was a whiz at helping new students ground and center simply by sitting in their laps during ritual – and he was also a master escape artist. He could climb or dig under any chain link fence, and did so on a pretty regular basis.

Katie, a born healer, is also a big dog and an unrepentant counter-surfer. I can’t begin to count how many times I packed my lunch, left the kitchen to get dressed for work, and came back to find my lunch bag and food containers in Katie’s crate and my ex-lunch in her stomach. She may be God-touched, but she’s still a dog!

2. Give your familiar and/or avatar full autonomy regarding ritual attendance. This includes personal workings, small group rituals, festivals, and rites of passage. Shortly after my Saturday morning revelation about Herman, my husband and I took him with us to visit my parents for the weekend. While we were there, I helped my parents bury the ashes of our old family cat in the side yard garden – an understandably emotional activity. Herman was in the back yard, separated from me by a picket fence. He could see me through the fence, but couldn’t get to me. As my father dug a hole for the ashes, Herman went nuts, for want of a better word. Instead of pursuing squirrels (his usual pastime in my parents’ backyard) , he was throwing himself against the fence and barking frantically, trying to get to me. I should have stepped over the fence, opened the gate, and allowed Herman to join the small ritual. After all, he only wanted to do his job.

There have also been instance and rituals where Herman or Katie did *not* want to attend a particular ritual, and we quickly learned to “listen” to their opinions – rather like knowing that it doesn’t feel right to take a certain tarot deck with you when you go do readings at a community event. We learned this lesson the hard way when we took Katie to a ritual she clearly didn’t want to go to and she had a seizure.

3. Give your pet enough down time. Just as you can’t be in ritual 24/7, it’s unrealistic to expect your pet to be “on, ” i.e. actively acting as a divine representative or helping you with your spiritual work all the time. Don’t bug him to help you if he clearly doesn’t feel like it – the fact that he’s asleep or ignoring you are clear signs that he “doesn’t feel like it.”

If you find yourself needing extra protein, water or sleep after a working or ritual, offer some to your familiar or avatar as well.

If you have a pet that also enhances your spiritual practice or connection with your deity, you have been given a gift beyond price. Very few animals, at least in my experience, can do this, and if you get one or even two in a lifetime, you have truly been blessed. It’s also not something you can actively look for; it’s like love (actually it *is* love) – the more you try to find that special animal, the less likely you are to succeed.

Be patient. If and when you’re ready, the right animal will come.

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Are We Killing Our Pets With Treats?

Are We Killing Our Pets With Treats?

Nearly 600 dogs have died since 2007 who consumed pet jerky treats made in  China, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Another 3,600 dogs have been  reported ill. The pet treats were sold under a wide variety of brand names.

The FDA currently does not know the cause of this outbreak and is reaching  out to veterinary health professionals, as well as the public, for answers to  help solve the mystery. Since the FDA is unable to determine the cause, no  recall has been put in place, meaning pet owners need to make more educated  decisions about what pet treats are safe to use.

I recently spoke with pet nutrition expert Anthony Bennie about the outbreak.  He provided some insight and helpful knowledge on feeding our pets healthy  treats.

LS: How long do you think this has been going on?

AB: It’s been going on since it became evident that it’s possible to sell  really cheap versions of what people want here. It’s one thing to copy  electronics, another to copy pet treats. When you take the theory of cheapest  practices and apply that to what you put in your animals’ mouths, it is a recipe  for disaster.

LS: What do you think caused the recent outbreak, with number of death and illnesses still on the rise?

AB: Irradiation (the process of exposing pet food and treats to  radiation as a means of eliminating foodborne microbes and killing pests) and glycerin (a humectant preservative) in virtually all pet treats from  China in pet treats from China. There have been issues with pet  food ingredients and finished treats from China for quite some time, including  the massive recalls in 2007 that were traced to melamine, a non-edible protein  additive used in China to adulterate and cheapen the products.

LS: Have there been studies done on the dangers of using glycerin and  irradation together?

AB: The use of both glycerin and irradiation in the same product is  troubling to me. No proper studies have been done to determine the possible  synergistic effects. For the health and safety of your pets, as a first step I  strongly encourage pet guardians to buy pet treats and foods made and sourced in  the USA; but even then, be a detailed label reader and avoid products with  chemical preservatives or other ingredients that you can’t pronounce and don’t  recognize as foods.

LS: The FDA made a recent statement that treats aren’t a necessary part of a  fully balanced canine diet. Honestly, I was  appalled by the ignorance of this statement. In addition to the nutritional  value,  my dogs are paid and rewarded well with treats. Nobody wants to work for free, including dogs.

AB: Our pets are  an extension of the family, so news like  we’ve been hearing is very  worrisome for any pet guardian. But to make a  statement like this, which  could damage many ethical American pet treat  manufacturers, is bizarre  and unfair. No one is claiming ANY problems with  American made treats.  It would be absurd to allow these fears to stop you from  offering your  pet ANY treats or between meal snacks. Think of your  own energy  level throughout the day; would you want to eat nothing all  day until your  single nightly meal? It’s the same with your animal  companions, who can lose  vitality and playfulness if these ‘pick me ups’  are simply cut out of the diet.  Emotional bonding is also reinforced  when providing healthy snacks to your  pet, and training often involves  food rewards. Give your pet treats and  snacks  in moderation as you always have.  But stick with USA Made, grain  free, low carb, natural snacks that  are dominated by meat protein but  offer a holistic balance with other whole  food nutrients such as flax  and veggies.

LS: I frequently give my dogs fruit and vegetable treats. They love shredded  carrots and cut up apple pieces. When purchasing  healthy treats, what should we look for?

AB: A healthy pet treat that is 100% USA made and sourced, and features   all-natural and wholesome ingredients like USDA inspected chicken and  beef  along with natural cheddar cheese, organic flaxseed, and air dried  vegetables.  My family-owned company, ClearConsciencePet.com, provides that in our dog treats. I  am proud to say that we have won six national awards for nutritional excellence.  People tell us that our Sliders® are like doggy crack. Dogs will do anything for  them.

LS: Thanks Anthony. I can’t wait to have Sanchez and Gina try them too! I’m thrilled that all of  your treats are gluten free, as my dogs are gluten intolerant, and I  don’t always have time to make all of their treats myself.

Do you give your dogs treats/ snacks? Do you look at the package to check the  ingredients and where they are made? Thanks for sharing your stories in a  comment below.

 

 

Pets & Animals Holiday Gift Guide

Pets & Animals Holiday Gift Guide

Any pets, animals, or the people who love them left on your holiday gift list  this season? Care2 Healthy Living has you covered! Check out our  suggestions for pet and animal holiday gifts.

Custom Pet Portraits Customized portraits are a great  way to show your love for your beloved pooch or kitty. Check out these  fabulously vibrant and quirky portraits from artist Zerrin Koch! Contact artist for price quotes.

Sweetie Pie  Treats Dog treats that meet all the standards: healthy, tasty,  and sustainable. Made from anti-oxidant filled sweet potatoes and free-range  chicken, these treats seem to be a favorite of dogs. Feel good about your  purchase — a portion of Bark Stix profits support Greyhound rescue and adoption  groups. $8.95

Hemp Dog  Bones These 100 percent Eco-Friendly Stuffed Hemp Bone Toys  consist of a hemp canvas shell and are stuffed with recycled poly-cotton, making  them an enjoyable chew toy for your pet. Soft, yet firm, these bones are perfect  for tugging, throwing, chewing and snuggling. $8.95

Support  Wildlife Want to honor the animal lover in your life? Give the  gift of preservation and protection of wildlife like polar bearswolves and whales with a gift to the NRDC.

Music to Calm Your Canine Companion, Vol.  1 Have a dog that could use some relaxation? Care2′s very own pet blogger, Lisa Spector, has just the thing for  you. The pieces are “clinically tested to calm dogs, and in many cases, reduce  anxiety.” $14.98

EcoChoices  EcoAnimal also has a variety of toys made out of post-consumer  recycled materials, such as the squeaky turtle posted below.

Zogoflex Dog  Toys Zogoflex differs from other plastics typically used in dog  toys in that it’s engineered to be recyclable and is made from an FDA-approved  material that is safe and non-toxic. Now if Spot gnaws up his Zogoflex frisbee,  his owner can send the broken remainders back to West Paw Design, where they’ll  be ground down, made into a new toy of the owner’s choosing, and returned at no  extra cost. From $8.50

Cool Hemp Dog Collars The cutest dog collars  ever, adjustable and made of hemp. $20.

Green Cat Collars Give the gift of a soft (not  nylon) and eco-friendly collar to your cat–try organic cotton, hemp, recycled  cotton or bamboo. $5-$13.

A Little Humor for Your Day – The Truth About Cats

The Truth About Cats

  • There is no snooze button on a cat who wants breakfast.
  • Thousands of years ago, cats were worshipped as gods. Cats have never forgotten this.
  • Cats are smarter than dogs. You can’t get eight cats to pull a sled through snow.
  • In a cat’s eye, all things belong to cats.
  • As every cat owner knows, nobody owns a cat.
  • “One cat just leads to another.” — Ernest Hemingway
  • Dogs come when they’re called; cats take a message and get back to you later.
  • Cats are rather delicate creatures and they are subject to a good many ailments, but I never heard of one who suffered from insomnia.
  • People who hate cats, will come back as mice in their next life.
  • Cats aren’t clean, they’re covered with cat spit.
  • A dog will jump on your lap because he likes you; a cat will jump on your lap because it’s warmer than the floor.

Turok’s Cabana

A Magickal Touch with Pets

A Magickal Touch with Pets

Author:   Luna 

At the time of writing this, I’m currently on spring break and spending time with my sister and relatives (many of whom I haven’t seen in five years) in the Upper East Coast of the US. It’s been awhile since I’ve been out here, but my Grammy’s house still feels like home. But there’s always been something about her house, our family (both on Mom and Dad’s sides) and my life in general that’s really come to the forefront in the last couple days: pets.

I’ve only been a Witch for a few years now, but I’ve been around pets all my life. Some of my first memories are of my uncle’s first dog, Dillan, a wonderful male border collie. He and I were around the same age, year wise (dogs and cats age faster than humans) , so I guess you could say I basically grew up with him. Then there was Lita, Jazz and Zeer, the three cats my Grammy had for a long time. On Mom’s side, one of my uncles had a golden retriever named Sporty, already old when I first met him. Then came Skye, who my uncle and my then-new aunt got as a companion for Dillan. And their puppies. There were five in all, though my family kept two: Nellie, who belongs to my Grammy, and Burn, who stayed with my uncle and aunt (and her parents) .

When I was about 9 or so, my mom and dad got our first dog: a Portuguese water dog by the name of Georgie. I still remember the first night we had him home. The poor boy hadn’t had a fun time on his flight to us (he never liked planes) , and he came out of his crate scared and sopping wet at home. But it was love at first sight. We dried him up, gave him something to eat and lots of love and petting, and he cheered up. From then on, he was our “choochie.” Or “Chooch, ” as we nicknamed him later on. Sadly, Georgie didn’t live as long as we had hoped. Shortly after he turned five and a half, he began to get sick for the first time. By the time we figured out that it was heart cancer, it was already too late. Georgie was already in the terminal stages and, rather than let him suffer for a few for weeks before death, we gave him a tearful goodbye (even thinking of it now makes me cry) , and we had him euthanized. I was about 14 years old then, but I cried like a baby from losing my best friend.

Despite how much we missed Georgie, we couldn’t bear not having a dog in our lives. Mom noted how she couldn’t bear to wash Georgie’s old nose prints off the living room window. So, after enough mourning time had passed, we went to another breeder and got Annie, a border terrier who was very active in her youth. She loved us, and we loved her dearly, but she seemed lonely without another dog around. So we went back to the same breeder and got her little cousin Iggy as well. Love at first sight, once again. I remember I had just come back from camp and Mom met me and her parents (who had picked me up from camp) at a strip mall on my way home, and there was Iggy, the tiniest little thing I ever laid eyes on. He rode in my lap the entire way home. We’ve been best buds ever since (and he still hasn’t grown up) .

We still have both Iggy and Annie today, despite the fact that my sister and I are both in college and don’t come home too often (Sis lives too far away, and I love my college a lot) . They’re both getting older now. Annie just recently turned 8 and has had three different knee surgeries within the last couple years. You’d never know it if you met her, though: she’s recovered beautifully. And Iggy… I think he’s one of a couple exceptions to the “Dogs age faster than humans” concept. He’s not as small as he once was, but he still looks and acts like a puppy. By the time this is posted on the Witches’ Voice, he’ll be seven years old.

So why do I mention all these dogs and cats? Well, there are two strange stories that go along with this. One is something I figured out a while ago, the other is more recent (like, just happened in the last 48 hours recent, as I’m writing this) . Both of these happened after I came to Wicca and dedicated myself to Witchcraft. You see, as I watched Iggy grow up, I began to notice many of his behaviors mimicked that of our first dog, Georgie. He was especially close to Mom and me, as Georgie had been. He loved popcorn, jumping on the table (well, as close as he could come—border terriers are a lot smaller than Portuguese water dogs) and doing 180-degree jumps. Eventually I began thinking about reincarnation, especially in a Wiccan context.

I remember reading in one of my books that “cats reincarnate too” along with humans. So I thought, “Well, if cats can reincarnate, why can’t dogs?” Over time, I came to the conclusion that Iggy was Georgie’s reincarnation, not only because they were so similar but also enough time had passed between Georgie’s death and Iggy’s conception (Annie was either already in her mom’s tummy or newly born when we lost Georgie) . It seemed like too much of a coincidence. I guess Georgie loved us so much that he couldn’t bear to be away from us. Frankly, if this is the case, I’m glad he came back. My life wouldn’t be the same without him.

The other story literally happened as soon as Grammy and my step-grandpa (long story—she’s still good friends with my Granddad, and I didn’t even know they were divorced until I was nine) brought me back to their house, the same house I mentioned earlier. They still have Nellie, though the rest of her family has passed on to the Summerland. Dillan lived to be sixteen, Skye lived to be thirteen, and Burn lived to be eleven. Nellie’s currently twelve, and Grammy and Grandpa Bill wanted another dog to keep her company. So they brought home a rescue dog named Candy, a little shih tzu who’s now five years old. Now, according to Grammy, Candy’s not usually fond of strangers, and she and I had never met before. However, within the space of five minutes, we bonded. She’ll come for me, she snuggles next to me on the couch, and she lets me pet her. Grammy says I have “the touch” when it comes to animals, and that I’ve become her new best friend.

But it didn’t stop with Candy. My other aunt and uncle on Dad’s side (his sister and brother-in-law) also have a border collie named Daisy. I met Daisy a long time ago, and we got along okay, but it was clear she wanted space between us. I obliged her that. Now, she’s twelve years old as well, and dealing with arthritis, but still well loved by her mommy, daddy and their two children (my younger cousins) . And now Daisy let me pet her and talk to her. Then we went up to my uncle’s house, where we were celebrating another cousin’s (his son’s) birthday. After their dogs passed on to the Summerland, they adopted two cats and recently adopted another border collie—well, Border collie mix– named Maggie (I guess border collies are popular on my dad’s side) . Within five minutes, she was giving me little doggie kisses and following me everywhere. Again, Grammy said I had “the touch” when it came to animals.

Now, I’m still not sure how I feel about Grammy saying this about me. She still doesn’t know I practice Wicca, and this feels like it’s hitting pretty close to home for someone I haven’t told. Still, she might have a point. I’ve been starting to work a little more magick with pets—I remember performing a little color magick for Annie while she was recovering from her knee surgeries—and I try to treat them with as much love and respect as I can. And I’ve begun to pick up on some of the vibes they give off.

For one thing, despite Iggy’s cuteness and love for me, I’ve realized he doesn’t like getting a lot of baby talk. Annie’s the same way, and I can’t say I blame them too much. Some of my family’s other dogs seem to feel the same way. I know they do like it when I talk to them as if I were talking to another human being, despite my sister’s objections to this idea. After reading about faeries from Ellen Dugan’s books, I’ve figured out that, whenever we think Iggy’s barking at nothing, he might be barking at brownies or other fae in our neighbors’ yards. And I’m always able to pick up jealousy vibes from my dogs—if I play catch with Iggy while Annie’s in the same room and not otherwise engaged, she’ll bark angrily and steal the ball. My parents managed to pick up on this too after I mentioned it enough. Always got to remember to give them equal treatment, otherwise one gets jealous and then chaos ensues.

So is Grammy right? Do I have a touch with pets? Are they able to detect that I’m a Witch and maybe feel more comfortable around me? Or do they just sense that I love pets and treat them with love and respect? Maybe all of this is happening. I’m not completely sure myself. All I know is that, whatever this is, I’m glad to have this connection with pets. The God and Goddess have blessed me not only with a loving family, but with a long history of loving pets, perhaps even one that came back through reincarnation to be with us. I earnestly thank them for it, and wish that this connection would stay strong in the years to come.

And to all of you and your pets, canine or feline (or perhaps something completely different) , I wish you all a heart-felt Blessed Be.