2,000 Year Old Celtic Coins

This is about Celtic coins found in Germany. Treasure Hunter Unearths Fortune in 2,000-Year-Old Gold Coins https://share.newsbreak.com/dh8sqwfy

Sunset Time for the Shortest Day of 2021 for the Northern Hemisphere

 

The shortest day of the year, in terms of daylight, is December 21, the winter solstice. But the days will actually begin to feel a bit longer two weeks before the solstice. That’s because the earliest sunset of the year happens before the solstice, and in 2021, it occurs on Tuesday, December 7.

For more about the shortest day of 2021 click here 

From The Farmers Almanac

 

Frankfurt, Germany, Europe

Daylight

8:09 am – 4:23 pm
8 hours, 13 minutes

Current Time: Dec 7, 2021 at 4:11:59 pm
Sun Direction: 232.10° SW
Sun Altitude: 1.02°
Sun Distance: 91.578 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 21, 2021 4:59 pm (Winter)
Sunrise Today: 8:09 am 126° Southeast
Sunset Today: 4:23 pm 234° Southwest
 
 

Rise/Set Times

Day/Night Length

London, England, Europe

Daylight

7:51 am – 3:52 pm
8 hours

Current Time: Dec 7, 2021 at 3:19:11 pm
Sun Direction: 226.54° SW
Sun Altitude: 3.30°
Sun Distance: 91.578 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 21, 2021 3:59 pm (Winter)
Sunrise Today: 7:51 am 127° Southeast
Sunset Today: 3:52 pm 233° Southwest
 
 

Rise/Set Times

Day/Night Length

New York,, New York, USA

Daylight

7:06 am – 4:28 pm
9 hours, 22 minutes

Current Time: Dec 7, 2021 at 10:08:33 am
Sun Direction: 155.25° SSE
Sun Altitude: 22.60°
Sun Distance: 91.578 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 21, 2021 10:59 am (Winter)
Sunrise Today: 7:06 am 120° Southeast
Sunset Today: 4:28 pm 240° Southwest
 
 

Rise/Set Times

Day/Night Length

Chicago, Illinois, USA

Daylight

7:04 am – 4:19 pm
9 hours, 15 minutes

Current Time: Dec 7, 2021 at 9:02:02 am
Sun Direction: 141.98° SE
Sun Altitude: 15.65°
Sun Distance: 91.578 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 21, 2021 9:59 am (Winter)
Sunrise Today: 7:04 am 120° Southeast
Sunset Today: 4:19 pm 240° Southwest
 
 

Rise/Set Times

Day/Night Length

Phoenix, Arizonia, USA

Daylight

7:19 am – 5:20 pm
10 hours, 1 minute

Current Time: Dec 7, 2021 at 8:09:45 am
Sun Direction: 124.20° SE
Sun Altitude: 8.30°
Sun Distance: 91.578 million mi
Next Solstice: Dec 21, 2021 8:59 am (Winter)
Sunrise Today: 7:19 am 117° Southeast
Sunset Today: 5:20 pm 243° Southwest
 
 

Rise/Set Times

Day/Night Lengt

Los Angeles, California, USA

Daylight

6:45 am – 4:43 pm
9 hours, 58 minutes

15 Must-See Astronomy Events in the December Night Sky (2021)

From spacetourismguide.com

While December is a month of extremes – cold and dark in the northern hemisphere and opposite in the southern – it’s also one of the best months of the year for amateur astronomers and stargazers.

A series of meteor showers occur in such quick succession that you might almost grow tired of wishing on ‘shooting stars;’ there are also good opportunities to spot solar system neighbors, watch the celestial dance of our Sun and Moon, and mark the astronomical calendar with the December solstice. Whatever drives you out to enjoy the night sky this month, be sure to bundle up – even in the southern hemisphere, it gets chilly at night.

If you need a telescope to help enjoy this month’s night sky events, we have a guide to the best stargazing telescopes and binoculars. On that page you’ll find resources on how to find a good piece of astronomical equipment that fits your budget and helps unlock the wonders of the December night sky. Ready to explore? Read on for all of the December night sky events you can see in the coming month.

Table of Contents

December 2 – Peak of the Pheonicid Meteor Shower

December 4 – Total Solar Eclipse

December 6 – Peak of the φ-Cassiopeid Meteor Shower

December 7 – Conjunction of the Moon & Saturn

December 7 – Peak of the Puppid-Velid Meteor Shower

December 7 – Venus at Greatest Brightness

December 9 – Conjunction of the Moon & Jupiter

December 9 – Peak of the Monocerotid Meteor Shower

December 10 – Asteroid 44 Nysa at Opposition

December 12 – Peak of the σ-Hydrid Meteor Shower

December 14 – Peak of the Geminid Meteor Shower

December 16 – Peak of the Comae Berenicid Meteor Shower

December 19 – Peak of the December Leonis Minorid Meteor Shower

December 21 – December Solstice

December 22 – Peak of the Ursid Meteor Shower

The Importance of November 11 Around the Globe

Please take a minute out of your busy day or evening at 11:11 AM or PM local time to remember those that gave their lives for their countries and for the family and friends left behind. If you meet a military person anywhere today or if you know a family who’s love one is serving, please take a few minutes to chat with them to thank them for their or their loves one’s service to whatever country you live in. But UNLESS you were in the military do not salute the military personnel as that is a right that only those who serve have the right and privilege to do to each other. If possible, make a small donation to whatever type of organization you have in your country to help them help those who are still servings and families of past and present military personnel. Thank you! The following articles help to try to explain why this day is so important in so many countries surrounding the globe. Much of it of information explains how WWI ended on this day.

United Kingdom and Some of Its Commonwealth’s Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day is observed in Canada (and other Commonwealth nations, which include 53 member states, nearly all of them former territories of the British Empire) on November 11. It carries much of the same meaning as America’s Veterans Day. Celebrated since the end of WWI, Remembrance Day actually marks Armistice Day — the day on which the hostilities between the Allies and Germany ceased on the Western Front.

WHEN IS REMEMBRANCE DAY 2021?

Remembrance Day, also known as Poppy Day due to the symbol of the remembrance poppy, is a day observed in Commonwealth member states. Countries such as Australia, Canada, and the United Kingdom observe Remembrance Day on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month.

HISTORY OF REMEMBRANCE DAY

At 11 A.M. on November 11, 1918, the guns on the Western Front fell silent after more than four years of continuous warfare. The allied armies had driven the Germans back, having inflicted heavy defeats upon them over the preceding four months. In November, the Germans called for an armistice, or suspension of…

Click here to read more about Remembrance Day from NationalToday.com

 

United States of America Veterans Day

Veterans Day, observed annually on November 11, is a tribute to military veterans who have served in the U.S. Armed Forces. Not to be confused with Memorial Day, which honors those who died while in service, Veterans Day honors all military veterans, including those still with us.

WHEN IS VETERANS DAY 2021?

Veterans Day is observed annually on November 11. It’s a holiday honoring men and women who have served in the U.S. armed forces, on the anniversary of the end of World War I.

HISTORY OF VETERANS DAY

Click here to read more about the USA Veterns Day from NationalToday.com

Today in History – November 11

Veterans Day

The Allied powers signed a ceasefire agreement with Germany at Compiégne, France, at 11:00 a.m. on November 11, 1918, bringing the war now known as World War I to a close.

President Wilson proclaimed the first Armistice Day the following year on November 11, 1919, with these words:“To us in America, the reflections of Armistice Day will be filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory, both because of the thing from which it has freed us and because of the opportunity it has given America to show her sympathy with peace and justice in the councils of the nations…” Originally, the celebration included parades and public meetings following a two-minute suspension of business at 11:00 a.m.

Between the world wars, November 11 was commemorated as Armistice Day in the United States, Great Britain, and France. After World War II, the holiday was recognized as a day of tribute to veterans of both wars. Beginning in 1954, the United States designated November 11 as Veterans Day to honor veterans of all U.S. wars. British Commonwealth countries now call the holiday Remembrance Day.

In an interview with the Federal Writers’ Project, World War I veteran Andrew Johnson remembered how his regiment…

Click here to read more about Armistice Day November 11 from The Library of Congress

 

 

National Education Day – India

India marks National Education Day on November 11 to memorialize the birthday of Maulana Abul Kalam Azad, the first Minister for Education in India. Maulana Abul Kalam Azad’s exemplary contributions to the field of education and institution building paved the way for the country’s modern system. Reputed as the main architect of education, he served as India’s first Vice President as well as the first education Minister from 1947 to 1958. Now, all educational institutions in the country mark the day with seminars, essay-writing, workshops and rallies with slogans on the importance of literacy and India’s commitment to education.

HISTORY OF NATIONAL EDUCATION DAY

In September of 2008, India’s Ministry of Human Resource Development declared the birthday of ‘the great son of India’ — Maulana Abul Kalam Azad — to be nationally recognized as Education Day. The day is also seen as an occasion to remember Abul Kalam’s contribution in laying the foundations of the education system …

Click here to read the rest about India’s National Education Day

International Observe The Moon Night – Global Moon Party

From NASA.gov (USA) National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Plan Your Event and Celebrate with Us

View our recorded Event Planning Webinar, and join the virtual Global Moon Party on October 9, for resources and activities that can take your International Observe the Moon Night to the next level.

Capture the moment like a pro! Check out our Moon photography tips for cell phones, professional cameras, and more.

The Moon is Earth’s constant companion, the first skywatching target pointed out to us as children. We watch its face change as the month progresses, and see patterns and pictures in its geological features.

It’s the object in the night sky that humanity knows best ― and the one that’s easiest to study. Whether your tools are a telescope, a pair of binoculars, or just your eyes, you can find plenty of features on the Moon.

We only ever see one side of the Moon from Earth. That’s because the interplay of gravity between Earth and Moon slows the Moon into a rotation that paces its own. The Moon rotates, but it rotates at the same speed that it orbits around Earth. This keeps the same side always turned toward us. We call this being “tidally locked.

The Moon has no glow of its own, but shines with the reflected light of the Sun. During its crescent phase in the twilight or dawn, you can also sometimes see the dark portion of the Moon glowing faintly in the sunlight that reflects off Earth, an effect called earthshine.

You can look at the Moon during any of its illuminated phases, but for better viewing of craters and mountains, try phases other than the full Moon. The shadows on the surface will be more pronounced, and help distinguish features you might otherwise miss.

Eyeballing the Moon

Looking at the Moon with only your eyes, you see mostly areas of white and gray. These gray patches are solidified volcanic lava flows. In the Moon’s youth, its interior was still molten, and magma would erupt onto its surface. These dark areas formed when massive asteroid or meteorite impacts on the Moon’s surface created basins. Because the impact basins were often the lowest places on the Moon’s surface, they would begin to fill with erupting lava. The lava was similar to the basalt that erupts on Earth and, like on Earth, cooled to form a relatively dark-colored rock. We call these areas the lunar seas, or maria.

The lighter-colored areas are called the highlands, and show the earliest crust on the Moon, dominated by a type of rock called anorthosite, which is primarily made up of the white mineral anorthite or plagioclase.

What you see on the Moon with your eyes only will vary depending on your eyesight. Give yourself plenty of time for your eyes to adjust and look carefully. You may be able to see some of the larger impact craters on the Moon’s surface if your vision is sharp enough, including Copernicus, Kepler, and Aristarchus and Tycho. You may even be able to see some of the bright streaks that are ray systems emanating from the Copernicus or Tycho craters, created when material was thrown outward by the force of the original impacts.

Lunar Sightseeing

Pick up a pair of binoculars, and the Moon transforms.

With binoculars, you’ll still see the entire Moon at once, but now it’ll have terrain. Smooth-looking patterns of gray and white resolve into craters and large mountain ridges. You’ll be able to tell where the Moon is relatively undisturbed and where it’s been pockmarked by impacts. Binoculars introduce texture, especially when you look at the Moon when it’s in any other phase other than full. Focus particularly along the terminator line between light and dark, where features will cast long shadows that make them clearer. Choose binoculars with a magnification of 7 at a minimum. Though a magnification of 10 or 15 will provide more detail, you may need a tripod to steady them.

Under the gaze of a telescope, the Moon becomes too big to take in at once. Now you’ll see real mountains, and not just craters but the crater chains created when impact debris splashes around the main craters. You’ll see valleys, and the cracks in the Moon’s surface called rilles, formed when the lava that once filled a basin cooled and contracted. If this is your first time looking at the Moon through a telescope, you may feel the same wonder Galileo felt seeing that familiar orb in the sky transform into another world. Be sure to examine the Moon at many different phases and on different days. Parts of the Moon near the edge of the disk come into view at some times but not others, a wobbling phenomenon known as libration. Experienced observers can take advantage of favorable librations to see about 59 percent of the lunar surface.

Published: September 20, 2021

Take on a Moon Observing Challenge from the Astronomical League. This activity challenges you to complete each of the following tasks:

  • Do an outreach activity. This could be an International Observe the Moon Night event or any activity that encourages observing the Moon in general.
  • Observe the Moon with just your eyes. No equipment is required.
  • Estimate the Moon’s percent illumination. Not illuminated at all would be 0%, half-illuminated would be 50%, and completely illuminated would be 100%.
  • Make a sketch or capture an image of the Moon that includes at least ten of the features below. Indicate your chosen features on your sketch or image:
    • Mare Crisium
    • Mare Fecunditatis
    • Mare Frigoris
    • Mare Imbrium
    • Mare Nectaris
    • Mare Nubium
    • Mare Serenitatis
    • Mare Tranquillitatis
    • Crater Copernicus
    • Crater Tycho
    • Crater Rays from Crater Copernicus
    • The Woman in the Moon

For more information about this challenge, and to learn how to submit your sketch or image, visit the Astronomical League website.

Note: You may make your observation any time between October 15, 2021 and October 22, 2021. The deadline for submission is November 22, 2021. You do not need to be a member of the Astronomical League to participate in this challenge.

A lot more Activities to do with People and Our Moon Goddess

September 30th Today in History

History on September 30th

Important Events

  • 1520 Suleiman the Magnificent succeeds his father Selam I as Ottoman Sultan (rules till 1566)
  • 1846 Anesthetic ether used for 1st time by American dentist Dr William Morton who extracts a tooth

Today’s Historical Event

On This Day in Film and Television

Events in Film & TV

  • 1939 In the first televised college football game, Fordham beats Waynesburg, 34-7 at Randalls Island, NY
  • 1947 In first televised World Series Baseball game, NY Yankees beat Brooklyn Dodgers, 5-3 in Game 1 at Yankee Stadium; also largest WS crowd to date, 73,365
  • 1950 Radio’s “Grand Ole Opry” is broadcast on TV for 1st time
  • 1950 WSM TV channel 4 in Nashville, TN (NBC) begins broadcasting
  • 1953 WICS TV channel 20 in Springfield, IL (NBC) begins broadcasting
  • 1953 WMT (now KGAN) TV channel 2 in Cedar Rapids-Waterloo, IA (CBS) begins
  • 1954 Sandy Wilson’s musical “The Boy Friend”, cast includes Julie Andrews, making her Broadway debut, opens at the Royale Theatre, NYC; runs for 485 performances
  • 1955 American actor and cultural icon James Dean is killed in a car crash aged 24

More Events in Film & TV

On This Day in Music

Events in Music

  • 1791 Mozart‘s opera “Magic Flute”, with German libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder, premieres at Schikaneder’s Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden in Vienna, Austria
  • 1935 George Gershwin‘s opera “Porgy and Bess” premieres in Boston
  • 1963 “Student Gypsy” opens at 84th St Theater NYC for 16 performances
  • 1964 “Oh What a Lovely War” opens at Broadhurst Theater NYC for 125 performances
  • 1965 Donovan’s 1st US TV appearance (Shindig)
  • 1992 26th Country Music Association Award: Garth Brooks wins
  • 1997 “Too Close” single released by Next (Billboard Song of the Year, 1998)
  • 2006 Farm Aid 19 held in Tinley Park, Illinois; performers include Willie Nelson, John MellencampNeil YoungDave MatthewsJerry Lee Lewis, Los Lonely Boys, Arlo Guthrie, Gov’t Mule, Steve Earle and Allison Moorer, Steel Pulse, Shelby Lynne, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, and Jimmy Sturr & his Orchestra

More Events in Music

On This Day in Sports

  • 1659 Peter Stuyvesant of New Netherlands forbids tennis playing during religious services (1st mention of tennis in US)
  • 1882 British Open Men’s Golf, St Andrews: Bob Ferguson wins third consecutive Open title; beats fellow Scot Willie Fernie by 3 strokes
  • 1887 8th America’s Cup: New York Yacht Club’s cutter Volunteer beats Scottish challenger Thistle by 11:48.75 seconds on corrected time to win series, 2-0 off Newport, RI
  • 1904 White Sox lefty Doc White, pitches his 5th shutout in 18 days
  • 1915 Red Sox clinch AL pennant by beating Detroit
  • 1916 Giants lose to Braves 8-3, ends 26 consecutive win streak
  • 1922 Yanks clinch pennant #2, beating Boston 3-1
  • 1927 Yankees slugger Babe Ruth smacks his MLB record 60th home run off Tom Zachary in 8th inning of New York’s 4-2 win over Washington Senators at Yankee Stadium

Events in Sports

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Events in Sport

  • 1659 Peter Stuyvesant of New Netherlands forbids tennis playing during religious services (1st mention of tennis in US)
  • 1882 British Open Men’s Golf, St Andrews: Bob Ferguson wins third consecutive Open title; beats fellow Scot Willie Fernie by 3 strokes
  • 1887 8th America’s Cup: New York Yacht Club’s cutter Volunteer beats Scottish challenger Thistle by 11:48.75 seconds on corrected time to win series, 2-0 off Newport, RI
  • 1904 White Sox lefty Doc White, pitches his 5th shutout in 18 days
  • 1915 Red Sox clinch AL pennant by beating Detroit
  • 1916 Giants lose to Braves 8-3, ends 26 consecutive win streak
  • 1922 Yanks clinch pennant #2, beating Boston 3-1
  • 1927 Yankees slugger Babe Ruth smacks his MLB record 60th home run off Tom Zachary in 8th inning of New York’s 4-2 win over Washington Senators at Yankee Stadium
  • More Events in Sport

    Events in Sport

    • 1659 Peter Stuyvesant of New Netherlands forbids tennis playing during religious services (1st mention of tennis in US)
    • 1882 British Open Men’s Golf, St Andrews: Bob Ferguson wins third consecutive Open title; beats fellow Scot Willie Fernie by 3 strokes
    • 1887 8th America’s Cup: New York Yacht Club’s cutter Volunteer beats Scottish challenger Thistle by 11:48.75 seconds on corrected time to win series, 2-0 off Newport, RI
    • 1904 White Sox lefty Doc White, pitches his 5th shutout in 18 days
    • 1915 Red Sox clinch AL pennant by beating Detroit
    • 1916 Giants lose to Braves 8-3, ends 26 consecutive win streak
    • 1922 Yanks clinch pennant #2, beating Boston 3-1
    • 1927 Yankees slugger Babe Ruth smacks his MLB record 60th home run off Tom Zachary in 8th inning of New York’s 4-2 win over Washington Senators at Yankee Stadium
    • More Events in Sport

      Events in Sport

      • 1659 Peter Stuyvesant of New Netherlands forbids tennis playing during religious services (1st mention of tennis in US)
      • 1882 British Open Men’s Golf, St Andrews: Bob Ferguson wins third consecutive Open title; beats fellow Scot Willie Fernie by 3 strokes
      • 1887 8th America’s Cup: New York Yacht Club’s cutter Volunteer beats Scottish challenger Thistle by 11:48.75 seconds on corrected time to win series, 2-0 off Newport, RI
      • 1904 White Sox lefty Doc White, pitches his 5th shutout in 18 days
      • 1915 Red Sox clinch AL pennant by beating Detroit
      • 1916 Giants lose to Braves 8-3, ends 26 consecutive win streak
      • 1922 Yanks clinch pennant #2, beating Boston 3-1
      • 1927 Yankees slugger Babe Ruth smacks his MLB record 60th home run off Tom Zachary in 8th inning of New York’s 4-2 win over Washington Senators at Yankee Stadium
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September 29th History

From On This Day

Important Events

522 BC Darius I of Persia kills Magian usurper Gaumâta, securing his hold as king of the Persian Empire

480 BC Battle of Salamis: The Greek fleet under Themistocles defeats the Persian fleet under Xerxes I

1567 War of Religion breaks out in France – Huguenots try to kidnap King Charles IX

1829 The first units of the London Metropolitan Police appear on the streets of the British capital

2008 Dow Jones Industrial Average falls 777.68 points, its largest single-day point loss, following the bankruptcies of Lehman Brothers and Washington Mutual

More History for September 29th

On This Day in Film & TV for September 29

On This Day in Music for September 29

On This Day in Sport for September 29

Remembering September 11, 2001 Twenty Years Later

CONTENTS

  1. World Trade Center
  2. Osama bin Laden
  3. Pentagon Attack
  4. Twin Towers Collapse
  5. Flight 93
  6. How Many People Died in the 9/11 Attacks?
  7. America Responds to the Attacks
  8. Department of Homeland Security Is Created
  9. Economic Impact of 9/11
  10. 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund
  11. 9/11 Anniversary and Memorial
  12. Photo Galleries
  13. SourcesSources

On September 11, 2001, 19 militants associated with the Islamic extremist group al Qaeda hijacked four airplanes and carried out suicide attacks against targets in the United States. Two of the planes were flown into the twin towers of the World Trade Center in New York City, a third plane hit the Pentagon just outside Washington, D.C., and the fourth plane crashed in a field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Almost 3,000 people were killed during the 9/11 terrorist attacks, which triggered major U.S. initiatives to combat terrorism and defined the presidency of George W. Bush.

Commemorating the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks, The HISTORY® Channel will premiere three documentary specials, starting on September 10. Watch a preview for all three specials now.

(I am leaving this post as is so you dear sisters, brothers, and guests can read the parts of this article and view pictures that you choose to read and/or look at.

Click here to read more of the article and see pictures about the horrific tragedy on September 11, 2001 from History.com

September 11th Victim Compensation Fund (VCF)

Solar flares and the Consciousness Connection

Are you experiencing sleep disturbances, feeling irritable for no reason, anxious, jittery, having visual distortions or feel immensely drained? If so you may be experiencing the effect of Solar Flares.

What are Solar Flares and Why are They So Important Towards Awakening?

The Earth is composed of a Magnetic field, also known as the geomagnetic field that encompasses the planet. The magnetic field extends from the Earth’s interior region to where it meets solar wind or a stream of charged particles emanating from the Sun.  “The magnetosphere is the region above the ionosphere and extends several tens of thousands of kilometers into space, protecting the Earth from the charged particles of the solar wind and cosmic rays that would otherwise strip away the upper atmosphere, including the ozone layer that protects the Earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation.”

Click here to read the rest of this article

Watch “Supermoon Total Lunar Eclipse Coming Soon”

From The Weather Channel Android App: https://weather.com/science/space/video/supermoon-total-lunar-eclipse-coming-this-month?pl=pl-the-latest

MOTHER EARTH/GAIA/ALL EARTH GODDESS’ EARTH DAY April 22, 2021

ALWAYS TRY TO LEAVE THE PLACES YOU TRAVEL CLEANER THAN WHEN YOU GOT THERE!

The theme of this year’s Earth Day is “Restore or Earth” As Pagans and/or Witches it is our duty to help clean up, plant new life, etc. for the Earth Goddess (Whatever name you may caller by). We are conservationists working at ground level to restore and keep the Earth Goddess clean. This way she can continue providing us with all living things that we make our shelter from the weather from, the clothes we wear, and the food we eat.

Remember to pick up after your dog as their scat has E.coli in it which if enough of it seeps into the ground our water and food sources could be come contaminated. Making our water undrinkable and our food inedible.

Treat her with love and respect

We thank you (insert the Earth Goddess’ name you use) for nourishing all living things that help to protect and nourish our physical bodies.

May we always strive to make you a beautiful and healthy in our every day lives.

These are our words to offer our help. This is our will to make our word rings true.

So Mote It Be ( Use whatever words you end your spellcasting and/or prayers with.)