Your Animal Spirit for October 20th is the Black Swan

Your Animal Spirit for Today
October 20, 2013

 

Black Swan

Wherever the Black Swan appears in your reading you can expect unexpected and unpredictable events to majorly impact your life in that aspect.  Beyond noting that the influences Black Swan indicates will be extraordinarily large in scope, it may be difficult to tell if the fortune it foretells will be good or bad.  Black Swan affected events may begin so subtly that they are very difficult to identify.  When trying to discover what the Black Swan portends for you, look for events that do not occur in your life regularly or at all.

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Your Animal Spirit for August 9th is Black Swan

Your Animal Spirit for Today
August 9, 2013

Black Swan

Wherever the Black Swan appears in your reading you can expect unexpected and unpredictable events to majorly impact your life in that aspect.  Beyond noting that the influences Black Swan indicates will be extraordinarily large in scope, it may be difficult to tell if the fortune it foretells will be good or bad.  Black Swan affected events may begin so subtly that they are very difficult to identify.  When trying to discover what the Black Swan portends for you, look for events that do not occur in your life regularly or at all.

Good Blessed Thursday Morning, My Dearest Friends & Family!

This was simply too cute to pass up, also so true. You find a true friend hang on to them and never let go. They are a precious gift from the Goddess!

Down to business, lol! Me, business, PLEASE! I thought today we would put up the magickal correspondences for the gems associated with Yule. Some of the gems are familiar, I believe there might be one or two odd ones that we probably don’t use very often. Also I have the Yule Daily Devotional Course, which I signed up for you. Guess What? Today will be the current issue! In addition to all the, I tracked down the story of The Snow Maiden. It is a Russian tale which is not that well known in the States. The version I found doesn’t tell the story totally. It gives you a glimpse into the tale. The Snow Maiden is a tale we would associate with Frosty the Snowman. I have been trying to track down winter folklore and tales from across the world. I love to hear and learn things from other countries. Heck, I have been trying to get the Australians in the Southern Hemisphere site to teach me to speak Australian. Would you believe I have not had one offer yet. I am wondering if they think it is to hard for me to learn, hmm!

Sorry I got totally side tracked. I am through rambling now. I am off to work. I hope you enjoy today’s edition.

Have a very Blessed & Happy Thursday,

Luv & Hugs,

Lady A

 

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Yuletide Herb – Mistletoe

Mistletoe

Botanical: Viscum album (LINN.)

Family: N.O. Loranthaceae

—Synonyms—Birdlime Mistletoe. Herbe de la Croix. Mystyldene. Lignum Crucis.

—Parts Used—Leaves and young twigs, berries.


The well-known Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant, growing on the branches of trees, where it forms pendent bushes, 2 to 5 feet in diameter. It will grow and has been found on almost any deciduous tree, preferring those with soft bark, and being, perhaps, commonest on old Apple trees, though it is frequently found on the Ash, Hawthorn, Lime and other trees. On the Oak, it grows very seldom. It has been found on the Cedar of Lebanon and on the Larch, but very rarely on the Pear tree.

When one of the familiar sticky berries of the Mistletoe comes into contact with the bark of a tree – generally through the agency of birds – after a few days it sends forth a thread-like root, flattened at the extremity like the proboscis of a fly. This finally pierces the bark and roots itself firmly in the growing wood, from which it has the power of selecting and appropriating to its own use, such juices as are fitted for its sustenance: the wood of Mistletoe has been found to contain twice as much potash, and five times as much phosphoric acid as the wood of the foster tree. Mistletoe is a true parasite, for at no period does it derive nourishment from the soil, or from decayed bark, like some of the fungi do – all its nourishment is obtained from its host. The root becomes woody and thick.

—Description—The stem is yellowish and smooth, freely forked, separating when dead into bone-like joints. The leaves are tongue-shaped, broader towards the end, 1 to 3 inches long, very thick and leathery, of a dull yellow-green colour, arranged in pairs, with very short footstalks. The flowers, small and inconspicuous, are arranged in threes, in close short spikes or clusters in the forks of the branches, and are of two varieties, the male and female occurring on different plants. Neither male nor female flowers have a corolla, the parts of the fructification springing from the yellowish calyx. They open in May. The fruit is a globular, smooth, white berry, ripening in December.

Mistletoe is found throughout Europe, and in this country is particularly common in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. In Scotland it is almost unknown.

The genus Viscum has thirty or more species. In South Africa there are several, one with very minute leaves, a feature common to many herbs growing in that excessively dry climate; one in Australia is densely woolly, from a similar cause. Several members of the family are not parasitic at all,being shrubs and trees, showing that the parasitic habit is an acquired one, and now, of course, hereditary.

Mistletoe is always produced by seed and cannot be cultivated in the earth like other plants, hence the ancients considered it to be an excrescence of the tree. By rubbing the berries on the smooth bark of the underside of the branches of trees till they adhere, or inserting them in clefts made for the purpose, it is possible to grow Mistletoe quite successfully, if desired.

The thrush is the great disseminator of the Mistletoe, devouring the berries eagerly, from which the Missel Thrush is said by some to derive its name. The stems and foliage have been given to sheep in winter, when fodder was scarce, and they are said to eat it with relish.

In Brittany, where the Mistletoe grows so abundantly, the plant is called Herbe de la Croix, because, according to an old legend, the Cross was made from its wood, on account of which it was degraded to be a parasite.

The English name is said to be derived from the Anglo-Saxon Misteltan, tan signifying twig, and mistel from mist, which in old Dutch meant birdlime; thus, according to Professor Skeat, Mistletoe means ‘birdlime twig,’ a reference to the fact that the berries have been used for making birdlime.  Dr. Prior, however derives the word from tan, a twig, and mistl, meaning different, from its being unlike the tree it grows on. In the fourteenth century it was termed ‘Mystyldene‘ and also Lignum crucis, an allusion to the legend just mentioned. The Latin name of the genus, Viscum, signifying sticky, was assigned to it from the glutinous juice of its berries.

 

—History—Mistletoe was held in great reverence by the Druids. They went forth clad in white robes to search for the sacred plant, and when it was discovered, one of the Druids ascended the tree and gathered it with great ceremony, separating it from the Oak with a golden knife. The Mistletoe was always cut at a particular age of the moon, at the beginning of the year, and it was only sought for when the Druids declared they had visions directing them to seek it. When a great length of time elapsed without this happening, or if the Mistletoe chanced to fall to the ground, it was considered as an omen that some misfortune would befall the nation. The Druids held that the Mistletoe protected its possessor from all evil, and that the oaks on which it was seen growing were to be respected because of the wonderful cures which the priests were able to effect with it. They sent round their attendant youth with branches of the Mistletoe to announce the entrance of the new year. It is probable that the custom of including it in the decoration of our homes at Christmas, giving it a special place of honour, is a survival of this old custom.

           The curious basket of garland with which ‘Jack-in-the-Green’ is even now occasionally invested on May-day is said to be a relic of a similar garb assumed by the Druids for the ceremony of the Mistletoe. When they had found it they danced round the oak to the tune of ‘Hey derry down, down, down derry!’ which literally signified, ‘In a circle move we round the oak. ‘ Some oakwoods in Herefordshire are still called ‘the derry‘; and the following line from Ovid refers to the Druids’ songs beneath the oak:
        ‘—Ad viscum Druidce cantare solebant—.’
     Shakespeare calls it ‘the baleful Mistletoe,’ an allusion to the Scandinavian legend that Balder, the god of Peace, was slain with an arrow made of Mistletoe. He was restored to life at the request of the other gods and goddesses, and Mistletoe was afterwards given into the keeping of the goddess of Love, and it was ordained that everyone who passed under it should receive a kiss, to show that the branch had become an emblem of love, and not of hate.

 

—Parts Used Medicinally—The leaves and young twigs, collected just before the berries form, and dried in the same manner as described for Holly.

—Constituents—Mistletoe contains mucilage, sugar, a fixed oil, resin, an odorous principle, some tannin and various salts. The active part of the plant is the resin, Viscin, which by fermentation becomes a yellowish, sticky, resinous mass, which can be used with success as a birdlime.

The preparations ordinarily used are a fluid extract and the powdered leaves. A homoeopathic tincture is prepared with spirit from equal quantities of the leaves and ripe berries, but is difficult of manufacture, owing to the viscidity of the sap.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—Nervine, antispasmodic, tonic and narcotic. Has a greatreputation for curing the ‘falling sickness’ epilepsy – and other convulsive nervous disorders. It has also been employed in checking internal haemorrhage.

The physiological effect of the plant is to lessen and temporarily benumb such nervous action as is reflected to distant organs of the body from some central organ which is the actual seat of trouble. In this way the spasms of epilepsy and of other convulsive distempers are allayed. Large doses of the plant, or of its berries, would, on the contrary, aggravate these convulsive disorders. Young children have been attacked with convulsions after eating freely of the berries.

In a French work on domestic remedies, 1682, Mistletoe (gui de chêne) was considered of great curative power in epilepsy. Sir John Colbatch published in 1720 a pamphlet on The Treatment of Epilepsy by Mistletoe, regarding it as a specific for this disease. He procured the parasite from the Lime trees at Hampton Court, and recommended the powdered leaves, as much as would lie on a sixpence, to be given in Black Cherry water every morning. He was followed in this treatment by others who have testified to its efficacy as a tonic in nervous disorders, considering it the specific herb for St. Vitus’s Dance. It has been employed in convulsions delirium, hysteria, neuralgia, nervous debility, urinary disorders, heart disease, and many other complaints arising from a weakened and disordered state of the nervous system.

Ray also greatly extolled Mistletoe as a specific in epilepsy, and useful in apoplexy and giddiness. The older writers recommended it for sterility.

The tincture has been recommended as a heart tonic in typhoid fever in place of Foxglove. It lessens reflex irritability and strengthens the heart’s beat, whilst raising the frequency of a slow pulse.

Besides the dried leaves being given powdered, or as an infusion, or made into a tincture with spirits of wine, a decoction may be made by boiling 2 OZ. of the bruised green plant with 1/2 pint of water, giving 1 tablespoonful for a dose several times a day. Ten to 60 grains of the powder may be taken as a dose, and homoeopathists give 5 to 10 drops of the tincture, with 1 or 2 tablespoonsful of cold water. Mistletoe is also given, combined with Valerian Root and Vervain, for all kinds of nervous complaints, cayenne pods being added in cases of debility of the digestive organs.

Fluid extract: dose, 1/4 to 1 drachm.

Country people use the berries to cure severe stitches in the side. The birdlime of the berries is also employed by them as an application to ulcers and sores.

It is stated that in Sweden, persons afflicted with epilepsy carry about with them a knife having a handle of Oak Mistletoe to ward off attacks.

The Witches Magick for November 24th – Black Opal Charm

Dragon Comments & Graphics

BLACK OPAL CHARM

 

The black opal is widely known as the “Witches Stone” and is prized for its magic
enhancing properties. To increase your magickal power, charge the stone with the
following chant and place it on your altar.

 

“Opal black, of burning fire
Add the power that’s required
To make my magic hit its mark,
By light of day, or night so dark.”

~Magickal Graphics~

Happy & Blessed Monday to you, dear friends & family!

If only I could, go back to bed that is. I have a doctor’s appointment today with a specialist. I will explain all of it later. Right now, I am hoping I can fly like the wind and get some posts on here for a change. Oh, I hope you like the new layout. I got to wondered if the problem could have been in the old template. The Apothecary wasn’t having any problems, so I just put 2 and 2 together and came up with 8, lol!

Well I have got to hush and run. I hope you have a super Monday, dear friends! Just remember only 4 more days till Friday. Do we live for the weekends? Hmm….I am off now.

Luv & Hugs,

Lady A

 

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Herb of the Day for August 12 – Broom

Broom

Botanical Name

  • Family Leguminosae
  • Sarothamnus scoparius syn. Cytisus scoparius

Common Names

  • Scotch Broom, Irish Broom/Tops, Broomtops, Besom, Scoparium, Basam, Bizzom, Browme, Brum, Breeam

Cautions

  • Take internally only under professional supervision.
  • Do not take during pregnancy.
  • Do not take if suffering from high blood pressure.
  • Do not take with MAO inhibitors as it can cause a sudden rise in blood pressure.
  • Farm animals that ingest large amounts, especially along with alfalfa, may suffer fatal internal bleeding.

Description

Native to Europe, broom is commonly found on heaths, along roadsides, and in open woodlands. It is naturalized in many temperate regions, including North America, Africa, Canary Islands, Chile, and Japan. In the US, Australia, and New Zealand, it has overrun large areas of land once used for recreation and farming. The plant is a tall deciduous shrub, growing to a height of six feet, with narrow ridged stems, small trefoil leaves and bright yellow flowers in leafy terminal spikes. The leaves and pods are mildly toxic to farm animals if ingested in large amounts. The flowering tops are used by herbalists for medicinal purposes and are gathered from spring to autumn.

History

Both the common and species names indicate its usefulness as a sweeper (“scopa” means broom in Latin).

Its medicinal value is not mentioned in classical writings, but it does appear in medieval herbals. The 12th century Physicians of Myddfai recommended broom as a means of treating suppressed urine.

Broom was adopted at a very early period as the badge of Brittany, and has a long and colourful history. Geoffrey of Anjou was said to have thrust it into his helmet before going into battle so his troops could see him.

Henry II of England adapted broom’s medieval name (Planta genista) as his family name Plantagenet).

The shrub was seen on the great seal of Richard I, and adorns the Westminster Abbey tombstone of Richard II.

 

Medicinal Parts

  • Flowering tops
  • Sparteine is a potent alkaloid with actions similar to those of nicotine, slowing the heartbeat by suppressing certain nerve impulses. Other alkaloids in broom have shown to raise blood pressure and stimulate uterine contractions.
  • Isoflavones are estrogenic.
  • Scoparoside is a glycoside that is believed to have diuretic and laxative properties.

Traditional Uses

Common uses included ridding the body of excess fluid especially in CHF (congestive heart failure), as well as for treating cardiac arrhythmias, including an irregular, fast heartbeat. The plant acts on the electrical conductivity of the heart, slowing and regulating the transmission of the impulses. Since it is strongly diuretic, it stimulates urine production and thus countering fluid retention common in CHF cases. In Germany, broom is considered gentler and less toxic than the drug quinidine for treating heart arrhythmias.

It is also used to stimulate uterine contractions, and, since it causes the muscles of the uterus to contract, it has been used to prevent blood loss after childbirth.

By constricting small arteries, broom is said to help control heavy menstrual bleeding and reduces varicose veins.

Daily OM for July 15 – Earth Chakras

Earth Chakras

Caretaking The Soul Of Gaia

As we walk upon the earth, we walk upon a living being more similar to ourselves than we imagine. Just like us, the earth has both a physical body and an energetic body, complete with a chakra system identified by ancient mystics and modern scientists alike. Gaia, as the earth is called when acknowledged as a living entity in her own right, has her own life force and her own path of unfolding, separate from us, but including us. Human beings and Gaia are intertwined on every level, not just the physical, and an awareness of her chakras can help us to acknowledge, heal, and enable her on her path, just as she selflessly returns the favor to us.

It is generally agreed that Gaia has seven major chakras distributed evenly across her body and connected to one another via two lines of energy that intersect at various points on the earth. The first chakra is located at Mount Shasta in Northern California; the second is in Lake Titicaca in South America; the third chakra is in Uluru-Kata Tjuta in Australia; the fourth chakra resides in Glastonbury in England; the fifth chakra is at the Great Pyramid in Mount of Olives; the sixth chakra is in Kuh-e Malek Siah in Iran, and the seventh chakra is in Mount Kailas in Tibet. In addition to her seven major chakras, she has minor chakras and other vortexes of energy that are significant to her life-energy system, and all these energy centers need caretaking. Just as we can heal ourselves through our own chakras, we can heal and support Gaia through hers.

While it would be a wonderful experience to visit one of the earth’s chakras, you can always participate in loving and healing Gaia wherever you are. Maintaining an awareness of the regions in which her chakras reside can be very powerful. You may place photos of the locales on your altar, sending healing energy to each of her chakras during your meditations. As you consciously connect your energy system to her energy system, the true meaning of groundedness reveals itself—it is a relationship with Gaia in which we acknowledge our calling as the caretakers of her soul.

Wishing You A Very Blessing Thursday, dear friends!

Fairy Images, Quotes, Comments, Graphics

All I can say is it Friday yet? Please, Friday, hurry up and get here! I am sure you can imagine how my life is going right now, HA! And that’s not “HA” funny, it’s “HA” this is pathetic. I have always heard about people having their grown children move back in with them. But I never, ever, thought it would happen to me. I love my children to death and there is nothing I wouldn’t do for them. My son has been here today, it makes 3 days, and it seems like 3 years. He works the afternoon shift 2 – 10 p.m., and sometimes he work 12 hours. The last couple of nights he has come in and has wanted to talk. I have no problem listening to him and giving him advice (and of course, telling him his shit don’t stink, lol!). But he is a worse night owl than I am. He wants to talk till 4, 5 or 6 in the mornings. This old dog just can’t hang. The bad thing, this old dog ain’t that old but this lifestyle will make you an old dog quick.

Yesterday, I got so sleepy I couldn’t stand it. I decided I had too much to do to take a nap. So half asleep, Kiki and I waddled out the door. I forgot to put her leash on her because I was half asleep. Well she stayed on the porch like a good girl. I thought, “this is going to be a breezy.” So with my mind settled Kiki was going to behave, I started pulling up stones. I have been running into wolf spiders every other stone. I lifted this one up and sure enough, there sit a huge wolf spider. I went to beating him with one of the stones. In the meantime, a huge black Lab comes strolling down the street. Little Miss Perfect (Kiki) took off like a bullet. Well I forgot about the spider, but the spider didn’t me. As I was getting up, the spider bit me always on my rump but thank goodness he missed. He got me were your leg ends and then the fatty part of your rump begins. I can’t wait to go to the doctor, oh brother. But anyway, I took off running after my idiot dog. My neighbor finally caught her. After all this, I was starting to get sick from the bite. We came in the house and I laid down in the floor and went to sleep. I got up around 11:00 p.m. I cleaned up the kitchen and told my husband, he needed to talk to our son. So I went to bed because I was sick from the bite. Well believe it or not, my hubby talks to my son. Three o’clock in the morning, I am sound asleep. Here comes my son wanting to know if I am a wake. Three in the morning why wouldn’t I be wide awake??? His father had made him mad and he wanted to talk to me about it. Well he talked to about 5:00 this morning. I need to go and buy me some more toothpicks to hold my eyes open. I don’t believe I am going to survive my son’s divorce. The funny thing, he thinks this is really rough on him, HA!

I feel like Lurch on the Addams’ Family, lol! All I know, my mother-in-law use to tell me, “If I knew then what I know now, I would have had puppies instead!” I now understand, she was a very wise woman!

Special Kitty of the Day for May 23rd

Name: Tonka
Age: Seventeen years old
Gender: Female
Kind: Calico
Home: Near Topeka, Kansas, USA
Hi, my name’s Tonka. As you can see, I’m a calico. I only weigh four or five pounds cause I’m a tiny little girl. I was born right here in the house I live in. My fur momma showed up here one day and the owners took her in. She was already expecting kittens and so here I am.

I used to go outside a lot and bug my brother, I’m afraid I never did like to play with toys that much. Now my favorite pastimes are sleeping, bugging my brother Pepper and my stepbrother Carlito, and eating. My favorite trick is to guard the can of food thats just been opened. If it’s sitting on the counter, I lay right next to it and will not let any other cat get near it. (It’s mine!)

Well, that’s about it. It’s been a pleasure talking with you, and now I’ll be able to hold my head up as high as Pepper has his.

Mom says: Her name started out as Tanqueray, but got shortened to Tonka over the years, I don’t remember why. Tonka is a better name for her anyway because I read somewhere that it’s a Native American word for strong or tough, and this little kitty is certainly both. Tonka thinks she’s the boss of the boys. Pepper goes along with it, but Carlito gets a little angry with her sometimes. It doesn’t stop her from trying to be top cat though.

She’s a very affectionate cat – she’s always looking for a lap to lay on and demands pets and back scratches if you happen to walk past where she’s laying. She’s terrified of strangers, and even freaks out when we get a package in the mail. If it doesn’t smell like home, she gets terrified and runs around the house hiding and peeking out to see if it’s safe yet.

Tonka is a little bundle of dynamite, and we love her all the more for it.