April 25 – Daily Feast

April 25 – Daily Feast

The wild pink verbena that grew so profusely along the slopes have moved to another area. In their place are yellow flowers, unfamiliar but like sunshine after a shower. A familiar saying is that the more something changes the more it stays the same. Flowers, like people and circumstances, change so swiftly and unexpectedly that it seems like the very foundation of the familiar is moving and changing before us. The Cherokees call this a ma yi, creek water. It is always moving and changing before our eyes. Nature reminds us to renew our minds – to update and enlarge our vision instead of accepting the daily changes of the world that come to nothing. No one has ever been so perfect that he cannot surpass himself and bloom more brilliantly in another area.

~ When we lift our hands we signify our dependence on the Great Spirit. ~

BLACKFOOT

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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March 27 – Daily Feast

March 27 – Daily Feast

When we were born, we could not walk or talk or even focus our eyes. But the ability to do all these things and more was born in us. By continual effort, we still grow and learn and develop our identities. We learned early that we were not a bird and not an animal. And this is where personality begins to question – then, what am I? Who am I? Why am I here? Is this an identity crisis? No, it is a belief crisis. Every person has a hard time believing he has a specific reason for being here. Some have such a hard time believing that they go out and demand what others have. They see themselves outside the circle – not believing their own words and beliefs put them where they are. To a Cherokee status is freedom to move, freedom to achieve honor within himself, freedom to worship, and freedom to do what is right without ridicule.

~ They (the Cherokees) are apt in catching the spirit of growth…. ~

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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March 9 – Daily Feast

March 9 – Daily Feast

We are not always granted the privilege of going back and doing things differently. If we were, could we? We might if we had new knowledge. Otherwise, we would do the same thing we did before. It was all we knew. Every race has had its Trail of Tears, in fact, every individual has suffered and agonized over what he might have done. Gentle people hope that by cooperation things will work for all concerned. It isn’t in the hearts of the gentle to think that others do not have their same heartfelt ways. But challenges in the present times are sufficient without adding the past. If we know so much now, we need to use it. We can, sometimes, project ahead by looking back objectively to tap some reserve of knowledge. If we lack such inner knowledge, if we lack wisdom, we need to ask. And then we listen for the still small voice of direction.

~ Chief Ross led in prayer and when the bugle sounded and the wagons started rolling many of the children waved their little hands good-bye to their mountain homes. ~

PRIVATE JOHN BURNETT

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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March 6 – Daily Feast

March 6 – Daily Feast

Remember when you do anything, there will be someone that will find fault, no matter what you do. The pleasure of an unhappy person is to find something wrong in others to salve his own discontent. The Cherokees believe that tests sharpen their wit and help them a s qua dv, win or triumph over opposite powers. It would be beneath them to accept criticism as something they must overcome. The Cherokees flick it off like to is, pesky mosquitos. We all try to understand our differences of opinion, to care what effect we cause in other people. But the bane of anyone’s existence is ignorance – our own. We want more than anything to correct what we know is wrong. And what we find wrong in others may be a reflection of our own wrongs.

~ May the white man and the Indian speak truth to each other today. ~

BLACKFOOT

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

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