Whispering Woods coven Faery Lore course: Final Exam

Whispering Woods coven Faery Lore course

Final Exam

 

1. “Red cap” may well be a symbol for the ____ ______ mushroom.

2. Ohdows are small North American faeries who live __________.

3. “Coiste-Bodhar” is a large black coach with a _______ on it.

4. Deduska is a Russian house faery that is often ________.

5. The meaning of the word “Barguest” stems from the description, _____ _____.

6. The king of Alaka, the magickal kingdom of the Himalayan faeries, is _______.

7. A horseshoe hung upright so that its ______doesn’t pour out, serves as a charm against faeries.

8. Jenny Greenteeth is a well known water faery living in the River ______ in Lancashire.

9. It is thought that Murraue can be either female or male and is generally someone who is born on a _____.

10. The Scottish word “eldritch” means _______.

11. A Catez has the head of a man but the body of a _____.

12. A Mine Monk is a _______ mine faery.

13. The children from a union of Nixen are called _________.

14. In general, Faery Godmothers appear _______ days after a child’s birth to determine its fate.

15. ________ is the faery horse of the knight known as Lanval.

16. Within the Christian faith it is thought that faeries are actually ________ ______.

17. Aerico is Albanian Dryads which can be found in old and barren _______ ______.

18. The Welsh counterpart of the Cyhyraeth, is the _________.

19. Hinzelmann is a unique German house faery that lived in ________ castle.

20. On the island of Baltrum the male mare is called ________.

21. It is thought that a horseshoe nailed to the bottom of the churn prevents butter from being meddled with by _______.

22. Gorska Makva is a Hag Faery from _______.

23. Peak District miners follow a ball of flame called a _____ _____.

24. Njuzu is a Zimbabwe water faery who appears as a ______ with a human head.

25. In Scotland the owl is known as ________.

26. It is said that wearing an ankle of Blue Bells at ______ will attract the attention of faeries to you.

27. After twelve years the _____ transforms from a dragon into a hag called a Kulshedra.

28. The Cauchemar is the ______ version of a nightmare faery

29. Ekimmu is an ancient ________ banshee

30. A ______ appears when a mushroom is fried in tar, salt, and sulphur and then is beaten with a rod.

31. Uldra is the _______ faeries that live underground.

32. The Rodjenice are ________ Faery Godmothers.

33. To keep a human child from being stolen by faeries it is customary to hang a pair of iron ______ above the crib.

34. Elves have _______ blood to distinguish them from humans.

35. The Schwarzbraunen Madelein is now known as St. __________.

36. The Teine Sith is the Scots Gaelic version of the ____ – _ – __ – ___.

37. When Gyre-Carlin rides the storms, she is known as ______.

38. On the Cabbyl Ushty, the _______ are turned backwards.

39. Neck is a Scandinavian water faery who is often seen playing a _______.

40. ___ ____ – ______ enters and escapes through a keyhole in the bedroom.

41. During the Battle of Culloden (1746 CE) the _________ was seen shrieking over the heads of the Scottish and English armies that were engaged in combat.

42. When a child is born the _______ induces the mother into a deep slumber.

43. Musail is the Russian King of the ______ faeries.

44. Landalfar, the Icelandic elves are considered to be _________ elves.

45. To invite the fairy folk to visit your home, hang a spray of _______ on your door.

46. Glaisein is strange ______ house faeries.

47. Barstukken is a German or Prussian Dryad that lives in the ______ of trees.

48. In Indonesia, the will-o-the-wisp is known as _________.

49. _____ – ______ are Iranian vampire faeries which in appearance are half man and half goat.

50. According to Gypsy lore, clumps of Nettle mark the entrances to the subterranean tunnels of the _____.

51. The ____ ______ is a Scottish sea cow.

52. Weles are _______ faeries who guard animals.

53. The only two words ever uttered by the ________ are, Mi phrein and Tu phrein

54. Lars Familiaris are the oldest known form of _______ house faeries.

55. The Doyla is said to live behind ones ______.

56. the Hmin range freely through the forest, and are said to _______ ____ those unfortunate humans they encounter, thus causing them to come down with malaria.

57. The little flecks on Foxglove are said to be the faeries __________.

58. It is said that cutting down an Elder will antagonize the ______ residing within.

59. The Cyoerraeth carry ______-______ when an impending shipwreck is about to take place.

60. Gyre-Carlin is the Queen of the fairies in the Fyfe area of ________.

61. It is said that if one sprinkles their clothes with ________ or carries it in their pocket, that no faery will approach them.

62. Wives of Rica, is the name for the Albanian _____ ________.

63. The Old Hag is the nightmare faery found in __________.

64. Boruta is a Polish Dryad that prefers to inhabit ___ trees.

65. Billy Wittwisp is a Will-o-the-wisp found in ____ ________.

66. Muireartach is the mother to the king of the mythical underwater realm of _______.

67. The Kikimora are reputed to be tiny women with ________ feet.

68. Haus-Schmiedlein are said to announce the impending death of a miner by knocking ______ times.

69. The ________ is considered to be the deadliest banshee in Malaysian folklore.

70. Gimle in Norse mythology is the home of the _____ _____.

71. Vihans are Gallic faeries who stand guard over ________ ______.

72. Befind means _____ _____.

73. Queen Summer rules the Native American faeries known as the _____ __ _____.

74. The ______ ______ were used to haul the “Afranc” from its lair in the River Conway.

75. Lunantishee guards the ________ bushes

 

The End

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

 

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Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Sixteen – Faery Godmothers

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Sixteen

Faery Godmothers

 

In general, Faery Godmothers appear three days after a child’s birth to determine its fate. They can bless the child or curse it. On occasion they will favor a child by giving it a birthmark.

Generally Faery Godmothers are dressed in all white.

In French literary fairy tales, fairy godmothers acted as actual godmothers did amongst their social circles, exerting their benefits for their godchildren, but expecting respect in return.

In preparation for the arrival of a Faery Godmother, the area of birth is made tidy and clean. And then various offerings are laid out on a table for them. These offerings include honey, bread, coins and other gifts. There should be a light in the room and the door should be left ajar. It is thought that these faeries generally live in caves.

Often Faery Godmothers will appear in threes and emulate the three Greek Fates who spun, measured and cut the thread of life.

Parzae – These are a type of Northern European Faery Godmothers. They are also known as Fates.

Orisnici (Establishing) – This Faery Godmother is found in Southern Slavonia. They determine what the sex of the child is going to be. Once the child is born a supper is offered to the Orisnici as a libation.

Rodjenice (To Give Birth) – These Croatian Faery Godmothers are said to live in caves. They are described as being very beautiful with pale faces. They wear all white adorned with silver or gold jewelry. They are often seen carrying candles in their hands. As Fates, they determine the sex of a child soon to be born. After the birth of the child, folks leave a libation at the entrance to their caves.

Witte Wieven (White Ladies) – These Dutch Faery Godmothers are said to be found near swamps and mounds. They are said to dress in all white and that as Fates they can predict the future.

Sudicky – These Bohemian Faery Godmothers decide the fate of newborn children. When the child is born the Sudicky induces the mother into a deep slumber. Then usually three Sudicky will appear and determine the child’s fate. One will spin the threads of life, one will measure and the third will cut the thread. It is thought that one can bribe the Sudicky for a favorable fate, by laying out a table for them laden with butter, cheese, bread, butter, salt and beer.

Befind (White Lady) – This is the name for the Irish Faery Godmothers. Three Befinds will preside over a newborns birth and then together will determine its fate. They will often bestow faery gifts upon the newborn child.

Rozanice (Mother) – These Slavonic Faery Godmothers determine the fate of a newborn child. Their name is derived from “roditi” meaning “to give birth”. She is often offered a libation of cheese, bread and honey. They are described as being tall and very pale to the point of being translucent, though they have sparkling eyes. It is said that when one encounters these faeries that they are unable to move.

Trois Maries – These are the Swiss Faery Godmothers or Fates, who determine the fates of newborn children.

Doyla – This Russian Faery Godmother is said to live behind ones stove. She generally appears as an old woman. If one is blessed with a good Doyla, then prosperity will follow one through life. But if a person gets a bad Doyla, they will never prosper. A Doyla, bad or good, stays with one for life.

Udelnicy (Dispensers) – These are the Faery Godmothers of Northern Russia who determine the fate of newborn children. As with most such faeries they are said to be beautiful, though pale of face. They are clad in white robes and adorned with silver or gold jewelry.

Ursitory – These are the Gypsy Faery Godmothers found in Romany folklore. Three Ursitory will appear three days after a child is born in order to determine its fate.

Wives of Rica – This is the name for the Albanian Faery Godmothers or Fates.

Arsile – This French Faery Godmother or Fate is known as one of the three “Bonnes Dames” (Beautiful Ladies). As with most Fates, she presides over the birth of a newborn and then decides its destiny.

 

Quiz:

1. In general, Faery Godmothers are thought to live in ______.

2. Faery Godmothers usually dress in the color ______.

3. Faery Godmothers are also known as ____.

4. When the child is born the Sudicky induces the mother into a _____ ______.

5. A Doyla, ___ or _____, stays with one for life.

6. Rodjenice is often seen carrying ______ in their hands.

7. ______ is the name for the Irish Faery Godmothers.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Fifteen – Nightmare Faeries

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Fifteen

Nightmare Faeries

 

A Charm to Control the Night-Mare

England

S. George, S. George, our ladies knight,

He walkt by daie, so did he by night.

Untill such time as he her found,

He hir beat and he hir bound,

Untill hir troth she to him plight,

She would not come to him that night.

 

A nightmare is a dream of particular intensity and with content that the dreamer finds disturbing. They are usually associated with rapid eye movement (REM) periods of sleep, and may be accompanied by physical movements. Until as late as the eighteenth century, nightmares were widely considered to be the work of demons, which were thought to sit on the chests of sleepers. Various forms of magic and spiritual possession were also advanced as causes. A mareinduced bad dream is called a nightmare in English, martröð (mare-ride) in Anglo-Saxon and Icelandic, mareridt (mare-ride) in Danish, mareritt (mare-ride) in Norwegian, and Alpdruck (alp-pressure) or Alptraum (alp-dream) in German.

It is said that by stopping up the keyhole, and then placing one’s shoes with the toes facing the door, and then getting into bed backwards one can protect oneself against nightmares or “Mortriden” (mare rides).

 

Mortriden (Mare Ridden) – This is the Germanic term for nightmares and is thought to be caused by an evil elf sitting on the chest of one sleeping.

Old Hag: This is what the nightmare faery is called in Newfoundland. It is thought that when an Old Hag is about, it feels as if someone is pressing you down. If one does not awaken they pass in their sleep from the Old Hag. The term “I was hagged last night” refers to those who have had an encounter with the Old Hag.

Murraue – the Murraue is said to slip up on a sleeping body, from below. At first one feels her weight on their feet, then the stomach and lastly on the chest. It’s thought that if you say her name she will retreat for the night. This particular faery is known to cause temporary paralysis in a sleeper. One should be careful not to stand beneath a pine limb when it starts raining. For if the water from the tangled pine needles, drip on you, a Murraue will be visiting in the night. It is thought that Murraue can be either female or male and is generally someone who is born on a Sunday.

Polunocnica – Polunocnica (lady midnight) a “demon” said to torment children in the middle of the night. This is a Slavonic nightmare faery.

Rittmeije (Forced Ride) – On the island of Baltrum the male mare is called “wålrüder” and the female mare is called “rittmeije.” Baltrum is a German island.

Stendel – in the deep of the night the Toggeli seeks out his victims, sits on their chests and steals their breath away.

Toggeli – This type of nightmare faery is found in the Southern European countries.

Waldruder – This is the male version of the nightmare faery found on the German island of Baltrum. He presses on the chest of the one sleeping in order to induce nightmares.

Cauchemar – The Cauchemar is the French version of a nightmare faery that sits on the chest of one sleeping and rides them through their dreams.

Le Rudge-Pula – Le Rudge-Pula is a type of nightmare faery who enters and escapes through a keyhole in the bedroom.

 

Quiz:

1. The Murraue is said to slip up on a sleeping body, from _______.

2. Toggeli is a type of nightmare faery is found in the ________ European countries.

3. A mare-induced bad dream is called a nightmare in _________.

4. One can protect oneself against nightmares by placing one’s shoes with the toes facing the _____.

5. _________ is called “Lady Midnight”.

6. The Cauchemar is the _______ version of a nightmare faery.

7. The Stendel steals the ________ away

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Fourteen – Faery Animals

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Fourteen

Faery Animals

 

Both, domestic and wild animals have been associated with the faeries. And they are often seen as dogs and horses, though other creatures can also be included as faery animals. For instance, eagles, owls and wrens have all been associated with the faeries. There are also the Selkie and the Roan which are in effect, shape-shifting seals. As well as ants, bees, butterflies and so forth. The world of the faeries is very diverse and so are the animals that are associated with them. Following is but a partial list of these amazing creatures.

Barguest – The meaning of the word “Barguest” stems from the description “town ghost”. The Barguest seems to have been a name used relatively widely for a shape shifting creature, which could also appear in the shape of a bear, indeed the name Barguest may derive from the German for “bear ghost”. The Barguest could not cross through running water, and as a black dog it was often seen as a portent of death. In general it is a Black Dog faery animal of Northern England. It is said to have claws and horns, along with glowing red eyes. He is often seen and heard dragging clanking chains behind him. He is almost always an omen of death, if not an impending disaster. One Barguest is said to haunt the North Yorkshire gorge of Trollers Ghyll. They have also been sighted in other locales.

Cu Sith (Cu Sith literally means fairy dog) – In appearance this dog is green with long shaggy fur; it is roughly the size of large calf and is considered dangerous to encounter. This is the only example of a green dog although green is a favorite color of the fairies.

Black Shuck – for centuries, inhabitants of East Anglia have told tales of a large black malevolent flaming eyes that are red or on occasion, green. They are described as being as large as saucers. The Black Shuck is said to vary in size from that of a large dog to the size of a small horse. The legends of Black Shuck roaming the Anglican countryside date back to the time of the Vikings. The name is thought to derive from the Anglo-Saxon word “scucca” meaning “demon”. The legend may have been part of the inspiration for the Sherlock Holmes novel The Hound of the Baskervilles. The Black Shuck is generally an omen of death but folks have been known to have lived after an encounter with the Black Shuck. However if one is to look him in the eyes they will surely perish. At times Black Shuck has appeared headless, and at other times he appears to have one eye. According to folklore, this faery dog often haunts graveyards, back roads, crossroads and dark forests.

Blanchard – This is the faery horse of the knight known as Lanval. It was given to him by the faery Tryamour. Lanval was a knight at King Arthur’s court. Tryamour was the faery mistress of Lanval.

Kelpie – The kelpie is a shape-shifting water horse that is said to haunt the rivers and lochs of Scotland and Ireland. It generally has grayish black fur, and will appear as a lost pony, but can be identified by its constantly dripping mane which usually looks like seaweed. Its skin is like that of a seal but is deathly cold to the touch. The kelpie tries to lure folks onto its back and then dive into a deep lake to drown its hapless rider. The kelpie has been known to eat the remains of its victims.

Bolla – In ancient Albanian folklore, the Bolla (also known as Bullar in South Albania) is a type of faery animal, dragon with a long, coiled, serpentine body, four legs and small wings. It is said to sleep all year long only to awaken on St. George’s Day (April 23rd). After a period of twelve years it transforms from a dragon into a hag called a Kulshedra. The Kulshedra is often depicted as having pendulous breasts and a very hairy body. The Kulshedra are said to cause droughts and to require human sacrifices to continue living.

Cabbyl Ushty – This is a Manx water horse that resembles a real horse. Except that its hooves are turned backwards. It has been said that it tries to entice humans to ride on its back. Once this occurs the Cabbyl Ushty swims out to sea in an effort to drown its human rider.

Boobrie – The Boobrie is a large faery bird found in Scotland. It is said to be a water bird with white feathers, though some accounts have it as having black feathers. Its bill is said to be three feet long and that it will stalk ships carrying livestock. It imitates the sounds of the livestock in an attempt to draw them overboard to a drowning death. The Boobrie then proceeds to feed on the drowned carcasses.

Cait Sith (Faery Cat) – This is a Black faery cat that roams the Scottish Highlands. It is said to have a white spot on its chest. There are those who believe that it is a witch that has shape-shifted.

Dinny Mara (Dooinney Marrey – Men of the Sea) the Dinny Mara are the Mermen (water horses) of the Manx. They are found around the Isle of Man. They can be benevolent to fishermen, but whistling on board may irate them, resulting in the Dinny Mara raising up a windy storm.

Pigs – According to Welsh folklore, pigs originally came from Faeryland. And the first pigs seen by humans were from a gift to Pryderi from the King of the Underworld.

Glas Ghaibhneach (The Grey cow with the White loins) – This is a Dun colored Faery cow or sea cow. They are said to inhabit the fresh and saltwater areas of West coast of Scotland. The Crodh Mara had many beneficial aspects and was even known to protect people from the dangers of the water horse.

Fuwch Gyfeiliorn – This was a faery cow that belonged to a band of faeries whom inhabited Llyn Barfog, a lake situated near Aberdovey near Wales. It is said that at dusk these particular faeries appear with all clad in green. Along with the faeries appear milk white, hounds and cows. One day a local farmer was said to have captured one of these milk white cows and upon taking it home, he prospered quite well. Years afterwards, the farmer figured that it was time to put the faery cow down due to its age. But when the farmer struck it a blow, it rose back up and disappeared back into the lake, to be seen no more.

Dog of Bouley (Le Tchan de Boule) – This faery black dog is found only the Channel Island of Jersey. He is not known to have killed anyone but he has been known to terrify his victims to the point of shock. He would drag a chain that made a noise so horrifying that it stopped its human victim in their tracks. It is said that he has eyes as big as saucers and long sharp teeth.

Ychen Bannog – These were two mystical long horned oxen or faery cows. They were used to haul the “Afranc” from its lair in the River Conway which is near Betwys y Coed in Wales. During this task one of the faery cows lost its eye. When the eye fell to the ground, it became a pool known as “Pwll Llygad Ych” (Pool of the oxen eye).

Selkies – These are the faeries of the Shetland and Orkney islands who take on the shape of seals. When they come upon land, they shed their seal skin and emerge in beautiful human woman form. It is said that if one can find the Selkies skin while they are on land that you can enforce the Selkie to stay as a mate. But should they find their seal skins, they will return to the seas. The Mac Codrum clan who hail from North Uist in the Hebrides claims to be descended from a union of a man and a selkie. They are called (sliochd nan Ron) “offspring of seals”.

 

Quiz:

1. Blanchard is the faery horse of the knight known as ________.

2. Cabbyl Ushty is a Manx __________.

3. The Black Shuck is found in _____ _____.

4. The Dinny Mara are found around the ____ __ ____.

5. Cu Sith literally means _______ ____.

6. The first pigs were a gift to ______.

7. ________ wears the skins of seals.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Thirteen – Mine Faeries

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Thirteen

Mine Faeries

 

As the name indicates, these faeries spend their lives living in subterranean tunnels and mine shafts. They are generally a desired faery to have about for they will point miners to the best veins of ore and will on occasion warn of impending disasters. For some odd reason, many mine faeries do not like whistling, bare heads or foul mouths. And if angered, they may present a very real danger to any miners in the local area.

Kobold – These mine faeries are dispersed throughout Denmark, Sweden, Austria, Germany and Switzerland. They live underground in subterranean tunnels. They are said to be very ugly and to stand about two feet tall. They dress in red or green and wear conical hats. They are generally mischievous but have known to favor certain miners on occasion. If one angers them they can become quite malicious. They were known to the Greeks and Germans as “Cobali”. The name of the element “cobalt” comes from kobold, after the poisonous and troublesome nature of the typical arsenical ores of this metal.

Cutty Soams – This mine faery is found in the border counties of Scotland and England. He was known to be very mischievous in that he would cut the ropes pulling the coal cars.

Meister Hammerlinge (Master Hammerlings) – This is a type of German mine faeries.

Gommes – These are the French mine faeries.

Coblynau (Knockers or Sprites) – These Welsh mine faeries are said to be only 18 inches tall and physically ugly. They carry tiny mining tools with them. They will often guide miners to rich lore deposits. But if offended, they will throw stones at the one that offended them. They are considered good omens since the location of their mining usually precedes the discovery of ore there.

Mine Monk – This peculiar German mine faery dresses in a green miner’s hat and blue jacket and hood, which gives him his name. They occasionally can be heard uttering the expression “Glückauf”, a traditional miner’s greeting.

Knockers – These mine faeries live in the tin mines of Devon and Cornwall in SW England. They were known to lead miners to good ore seams by knocking or tapping. They expect to be rewarded with an offering of food for their efforts. They don’t like bear heads, swearing or whistling. And if annoyed they will make faces at the miners. They are said to be small in stature and quite ugly in looks. Some legends have it that they are the spirits of the Jews who crucified the Christian, Christ and are now doing penitence for their deeds.

Tylwyth Teg y Mwn (The Fair Folk of the mine) – These are Welsh mine faeries known as knockers. They are said to be ruled by King Gwydion.

Fiery Drake – This is said to be a ball of flame that leads Peak District miners to the best ore veins.

Schact-Zwergen (Shaft Dwarfs) These are the Austrian mine faeries.

Haus-Schmiedlein (Little House Knockers) – These Bohemian mine faeries are said to announce the impemding death of a miner by knocking three times. They alert miners to lessor misfortunes when they are heard digging or pounding on the rocks.

Wichtlein (Little Wight) – These South German mine faeries wear white hooded shirts, leather aprons and they carry miniature tools. They stand about two feet tall. It is said that their presence in a mine indicates a rich vein of ore, nearby. They will often warn miners of a miner’s death by tapping on the walls three times. They warn of impending disasters by the sound of digging and pounding. They expect a daily offering of food by area miners. And once a year the miners are expected to present them with a small red coat as appreciation for their help.

Karzelek – These are the Polish mine faeries. They live in underground tunnels and guard enormous treasures. They are about three feet tall and sometimes appear as naked children or as flickers of light. They have been known to show miners where a good seam of ore is. But if irritated, they will cause cave-ins and other disasters. It is said that they don’t like whistling, swearing or bear heads. S

chwarzbraunen Madelein (Black-Brown maiden) – This mine faery is found in western Slavonia. The miners there would pray to her and make a food offering before entering the mines. She has since been absorbed into Christian beliefs and deified as St. Barbara.

Pcuvus – These are the Romanian mine faeries. According to Gypsy lore, clumps of Nettle mark the entrances to their subterranean tunnels where they reside over a hoard of precious metals and gems.

 

 

Quiz:

1. Gommes are the _______ mine faeries.

2. Bohemian mine faeries are said to announce the impending death of a miner by knocking _____ times.

3. Knockers live in the ___ mines

4. Mine faeries do not like _________, bare heads or foul mouths.

5. Tylwyth Teg y Mwn are the _______ faeries.

6. Wichtlein expect a daily offering of _____ by area miners.

7. In regards to the Pcuvus, clumps of ______ mark the entrances to their subterranean tunnels.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Twelve – Banshees

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Twelve

Banshees

 

There are many different names for Banshee’s, for they appear around the world. Some of these are very descriptive, for instance: Badhbh C haointe (Wailing Crow) is one of the names for the Banshee. Another is Bean Chaointe (Wailing Woman). According to Irish tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neill’s, the O’Brien’s, the O’Connor’s, the O’Grady’s and the Kavanaghs. These are the original Irish families of Milesian ancestry. The Irish word “Bean Sidhe” (bann-SHEE), means “spirit woman.” The Banshee is sometimes accompanied by the “Coiste-Bodhar” which is a large black coach with a coffin on it. When there are several or more banshees gathered together it is a warning that someone of great importance is about to die.

Gwrach Y Rhibyn (GOO-rakh uh HREE-bun) (Hag of the Dribble) (witch of Rhibyn) – This Welsh banshee appears at crossroads, streams, and mountain sides. She has black teeth snarled hair. And she has wings like a bat. If one encounters her and she is screaming my spouse, my spouse, then your spouse is about to perish. If she is screaming my child, my child, then a child is about to perish. It is said that she warns important Welsh families.

Caoineag (The Weeper) – She is a Scottish banshee and a member of the Fauth (Gaelic water spirits). She is seldom seen but can be heard at night wailing by waterfalls or weeping by streams prior to the demise of a clan.

Aoibhill – She is a Faery Queen who appear as a Banshee to the Dalcassian family of North Munster. When a member of the O’brien clan hears Aoibell playing her harp, they are not long for this world. She is sometimes referred to as “banfháidh O mBriain” (prophetress of Clann UíBriain). As a Faery queen, she rules over the Craig Liath (Grey Rock) located in County Clare.

Bean-Nighe (Washer Woman) – She is thought to be the spirit of a woman who has been murdered or of one who died during childbirth and who had left behind a pile of dirty clothes. A Bean Nighe is thought to have one nostril, one large protruding tooth, webbed feet and long hanging breasts. She washes the bloodstained clothes of those who are about to die. Her sad litany goes “Se do leine se do leine ga mi nigheadh” (It is your shirt that I am washing, your shirt that I am washing). If one can catch her unawares then one can have their questions answered by the banshee. Her description changes as per her locale.

Bowa – This is the banshee that represents East Munster. She is known as Bachuntha.

Caointeach (Wailer) – This Scottish banshee is found in the vicinity of Argyllshire and Skye. She appears as a small woman wearing a green gown and a tall white hat. She has one very large front tooth and no nose. She strikes at the legs with the wet linens she is washing, at anyone that happens to espy her. She is local to the Scottish highlands. She keens for the Scottish clans of Macmillan, Matheson, Macfarlane, Kelly, Shaw, and Currie. Her Welsh counterpart is the Cyhyraeth.

Dullohan – These Irish faeries are headless phantoms who drive the black coaches that sometimes accompany banshees. Their coaches are pulled by headless horses, and wherever they come to rest, someone dies.

Cyhiraeth (kuh-HEE-ryth) – This is a Cornish banshee who is said to have long black teeth. She originally was a Welsh Goddess of streams.

Cyoerraeth – These Welsh banshees are unique in that they can be either male or female. They are said to have black teeth and matted hair. They are heard but rarely seen. They are said to beat things against the window while loudly keening when someone is about to die. They also warn spouses that their other half is about to pass. And they are said to walk along the beach carrying corpse-candles when an impending shipwreck is about to take place.

Ekimmu (that which is snatched away) – She was an ancient Assyrian banshee who would wail, outside of the door of the one who was about to pass. Ekimmus are spirits of those who were not buried properly, they are extremely vengeful toward the living.

Klage-Weib (Wailing Woman) – This is a very large German banshee. She is said to be draped in funeral clothes and that her eyes are black and hollow. She walks about during stormy nights and when she stretches her arms about a house that one of the inhabitants within is about to die. Ekimmu’s origins date back to 4000 BCE. Ekimmus were referred to as the evil gusts of wind.

Bocanachs – as Cuchulainn went into battle against the forces of Maeve he was forced to fight his foster brother “Ferdia”. As a means of countering the demonic spirits of Maeve, there flew around Cuchulainn several demonic spirits. One of these was the Bocanachs, which are thought to be the progeny of the Irish banshee’s.

Skree – This Scottish banshee is said to have reds eyes and wings like a bat. During the Battle of Culloden (1746 CE) she was seen shrieking over the heads of the Scottish and English armies that were engaged in combat.

 

Quiz:

1. The Coiste-Bodhar is a large black coach with a ______ on it.

2. Bowa is the banshee that represents _____ _______.

3. Cyoerraeth cab be either ______ or _______.

4. Around Cuchulain flies the __________.

5. Aoibhill is a banshee from _____ _______.

6. Badhbh C haointe, means ______ ____.

7. Bean-Nighe washes the ___________ clothes of those who are about to die.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Eleven – Tree Faeries

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Eleven

Tree Faeries

 

Dryad comes from the Greek word “drus” (Tree). In Greek mythology there are two types of Dryads. There were the nymphs who lived in the trees but could leave them to revel away the night. And there are the Hamadryads. These Dryads were said to have the upper body of a woman with the lower body being that of a tree trunk. These particular Dryads were permanently attached to their trees. When the tree died, so did the Nymph within the tree. Dryads are exceptionally fond of Oak trees.

Shamantin (Tall Ghost) – This African Dryad is married to the evil forest faery, “Sasabonsum”. She is said to be white and is very tall. Unlike her husband, she is benevolent to forest travelers. If you come across her she will teach you the lore of the forest.

Vanadevata – These Indian Dryads make their homes in the trees and are quick to punish those who cut down their trees.

Zina Magdalina – She is a Romanian faery who resides in the World Tree which is thought to support the earth.

Aerico – These Albanian Dryads can be found in old and barren Cherry trees. They are very mean spirited and do not like humans. It’s said that if one were to venture into the shade beneath their branches that one will come away with pain and swelling in both, the hands and feet.

Wood Wives (Wish wives) – These woodland faeries hail from Germany and Scandinavia. They are said to inhabit old forests and sacred groves. They are also said to be extremely emotional, for they will start crying and wailing without warning. They are said to be covered in moss and to have a shaggy like appearance. On occasion they will ask humans for assistance or for food and in return they leave a handful of wood chips that turn into gold. They are said to be the prey of the Wild Huntsmen, though if they can reach a tree with a cross etched in it they are safe from the Huntsmen.

Askafroa (Wife of the Ash) – She is a very evil Scandinavian Dryad. At one point in history she was presented with a sacrifice every Ash Wednesday to keep her appeased.

Barstukken – This is a German or Prussian Dryad that lives in the roots of trees.

Vadleany (Forest Girl) – This forest faery is found in Hungary. She is said to have long hair that drags the ground. She excels at seducing young men in order to drain their strength. When the forest trees rustle it is said that she is about the area.

Baumesel (Ass of the Trees) – This is a German Dryad that lives in the branches of the trees and is considered to be evil.

Bela – These are Indonesian Dryads who live in the trees. If a forester wishes to cut down a Bela’s tree, they must first offer it food and politely coach it to move to another tree. Failure to do so will cause the Bela to inflict illness or cause nightmares to the offender.

Bodach Na Croibhe Moire – This Irish tree faery lives in the branches of trees. He is often depicted as a small, strong old man.

Nats – These are the nature spirits of Burma. They are divided into four different classifications. The Akakasoh are said to dwell in the top branches of a tree. The Shekkasoh dwell in the trunk of the tree. The Boomasoh dwell in the roots of the tree. And last but not least, the Hmin range freely through the forest and are said to violently shake those unfortunate humans they encounter, thus causing them to come down with malaria.

Helike – She was one of the nymphs who nurtured Zeus in his infancy on Crete. She is a “willow-nymph”.

Boruta – She is a Polish Dryad that prefers to inhabit Fir trees.

Lunantishee (Moon Faeries) – These Irish faeries appear as as old bald men with pointed ears. They have long arms and teeth. And they guard the Blackthorn bushes. It is said that they will not allow a branch to be cut on May 11th or Nov. 11th (the old dates for Beltain and Samhain). To do so will result in bad luck. They are said to dance in the moonlight and to have a dislike for humans.

Elder Mother – She is said to be the guardian of the Elder tree. If one wishes to pick Elderberries, they must first obtain her permission. If one fails to do so, then their livestock will become afflicted with illness.

Hongatar – The Hongatar are Scandinavian tree faeries.

Kirnis – These are the Lithuanian tree faeries who guard the Cherry tree.

 

Quiz:

1. Boruta is a Polish Dryad that prefers to inhabit ____ trees.

2. Vanadevata are quick to _______ those who cut down their trees.

3. Zina Magdalina resides in the _______ tree.

4. Barstukken lives in the _______ of trees.

5. In Greek mythology there are ____ types of Dryads.

6. The Hongatar are _________ tree faeries.

7. Dryads are exceptionally fond of _____ trees.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course: Lesson Ten – Elves

Whispering Woods Faery Lore Course

Lesson Ten

Elves

 

Elves were thought to cause sicknesses such as the “aelfsogotha” or “elf disease” which made a human’s eyes go yellow (possibly jaundice), or “elf cake” consisting of a hardness in the side (perhaps a hernia) and the waeteraelfadl or “water elf disease” (this could have been linked to chickenpox for in Germany it is still known as waterpox or wasserpocken). The Scottish word “eldritch” means uncanny and is either formed from the Anglo-Saxon aelf and ric referring to a place rich in spirits, “orelfrice” meaning the fairy kingdom, or Fairyland. Elb is an Old Germanic term for a female elf. Erl is that of a male elf. In the Christian belief, elves have White blood to distinguish them from humans. They are considered not worthy enough to enter the Christian kingdom of heaven and the white blood gives them away. This is why they steal human babies in order to dilute their blood and thus be able to sneak in. Anglo Saxon doctors (Leeches) would use “Aelfthone” (Circaea lutetiana) in order to counteract the power of evil elves) when administering care.

Leprechauns: The leprechaun is known as the fairy shoemaker of Ireland and is often portrayed working on a single shoe. Among the most popular of beliefs about leprechauns is that they are extremely wealthy and like to hide their gold in secret locations, which can only be revealed if a person were to actually capture and interrogate a leprechaun for his pot of gold. The name leprechaun may have derived from the Irish “leath bhrogan” (shoemaker), or its origins may lie in the Irish “luacharma’n” (pygmy). A family branch of the leprechaun is the Cluricaun who are known to steal or borrow most anything, as well as raiding wine cellars and larders. They will also harness sheep, goats, dogs and even domestic fowl and ride them throughout the country at night.

Wayland Smith: He is a well known elf rumored to live in Waylands Smithy. This is a chambered Neolithic barrow located in Berkshire in the South of England. He is said to be a skillful blacksmith. Legend has it that if a rider leaves their horse tethered there on a full moon, that the next morning the horse will be newly shod. Some believe that he is the King of elves in that area of the world.

Aelf: is a Scandinavian elf, the name meaning something like “White Spirit” or “shining spirit”. Aelfs were originally nature or fertility spirits, with a great many varieties such as the dunaelfen or hill elves, wyldaelfen or wild-elves, field elves, mountain elves, sea elves, wood elves and water elves. Aelf or elf appears as a component of many human names including Aelfgar (elf-spear), Aelfhelm (elf-helmet) Elfrida (threatening elf), Alvin (elf friend) and Aelfric (elf King), which survives as Aubrey. The most famous elf name belongs to King Aelfred, better known as Alfred the Great; which means “elf-counsel”. This was a famous early English king’s name and indicates that he was cunning in council, or as crafty as a supernatural being. One Archbishop of Canterbury was called Aelfhaeg, meaning “high as an elf”.

Prometheus – This Elf is considered to be the first of his kind. In turn he married a female elf from the Gardens of Adonis and thus created a nation of elves.

Alfheim – According to Scandinavian folklore, this is the home of the Light Elves known as the “Liosalfar”. It is located in the Middle world and is ruled over by the Norse God “Frey”. It is one of the nine worlds and is located on the highest level of the Norse universe.

Svartalfheim: According to Norse mythology this is the home of the Dark elves. It is located on the same level as Midgard. The Dark elves are known as the Svartálfar (black elves) or Dökkálfar (Dark elves). These are Dark elves that live below ground. They are known to be very evil and are no friends of humans.

Vattaren – These Swiss elves dress in brown fur and are said to have long arms and legs along with rather round bodies. When they adopt a human house they are mischievous to the point of being considered poltergeists. If placated with gifts they will perform chores much as a House faery will.

Erlkonig – This German elf is often seen wearing dandy clothes and a gold crown. He sometimes leads the Wild Hunt. It is said that the Erlkonig is a omen of death. If he is seen with a painted face then the one about to die will do so very painfully. But if he is of clear face then the destined one will die peacefully.

Xindhi – These male Albanian elves are said to be good natured to humans. Yet they have been known to be mischievous on occasion. If one sees a flicker of flame or hears a door creaking, it is said that they are about. The females are known as “Xindha”.

Elves of Light: – These are the Algonquin faeries who hail from the Quebec area of Canada. They are ruled over by “Queen Summer”.

Garconer (Love Talker) – This Irish elf is a sweet talker who has a fancy for human women. He has bright black eyes and smokes a pipe. Should a mortal woman fall prey to his charms they inevitably end up dying upon his departure in pursuit of another mortal woman.

Gimle (Fire Proof) – In Norse mythology, this is the home of the Light Elves. It is a shining hall located in the Third Heaven.

Landalfar – These Icelandic elves are considered to be protective elves. If ever they are driven from the land, then Iceland would become vulnerable to invasion.

Mannikin (Little Man) – This is a German term for elves.

Psotnik – These are Slavonic elves. They are said to be very mischievous.

Elf Arrows – These are Neolithic arrowheads that elves shoot at humans.

Elf Bolt – This is a disease of farm animals caused by Elf Arrows.

Elf Bore – A piece of wood that is missing the knot(s).

Elf Cake – This is a disease elves inflict upon humans that causes the spleen to enlarge.

Elf Child – Also known as a changeling.

Elf Cup – This is a stone that has been hollowed out by dripping water.

Elf Fire – Another name for a Will o’ the Wisp.

Elf Locks – Tangles and knots in the hair caused by elves playing with your hair at night.

Elf Marked – Birth marks and other natural birth defects caused by mischievous elves.

Elf Taken – Bewitched or enchanted humans.

Elf Twisted – Elf-inflicted strokes and other attacks, which leave humans in a state of deformity or fasciations; deformed vegetation.

 

Quiz:

1. The Scottish word “eldritch” means ________.

2. Wayland Smith is said to be a skillful _________.

3. Mannikin is a German term for _______.

4. Female Albanian elves are known as _______.

5. Vattaren are ______ eleves.

6. An elf sickness that cause hardening in the side is known as a ____ _____.

7. The leprechaun is known as the fairy _________ of Ireland.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Course: Lesson Nine – Miscellaneous Faeries

Whispering Woods Faery Course

Lesson Nine

Miscellaneous Faeries

 

There are many faeries which do not fit into a particular category. And so rather then pass over these unique and interesting faeries they are listed here for your learning pleasure.

Mekumwasuck – These are the faeries of the Native American Passamaquody. They are about two feet high and extremely ugly. It is said that if one looks directly at you that you will be afflicted with some type of disease. They are found along the border between the United States and Canada.

Bokwus – These Native American faeries often sport war paint and are found in Fir and Spruce forests. They shove anglers off of the banks so that they will drown. The Bokwus then take their souls with him.

Nagumwasuck – These are faeries of the North American Passasaquody people. They are about three feet tall and are rarely seen. It is has been said that they help out hunters in need. And will sing when there is a death within the tribe. They have also been known to appear and dance at weddings.

Ohdows – These small North American faeries live underground. They use their magickal powers to keep demons and giants from emerging from the earth and causing earthquakes and similar disasters.

Agogwe – They are Tanzanian faeries who manifest as tiny, hairy red men.

Catez – This is a Southern Slavonic woodland faery. It has the head of a man but the body of a goat. It is found near fields and waterfalls.

Joulupukki (Yule Buck) – A Finnish faery that delivers gifts at Christmas time.

Abiku: This evil faery which is known by the African Dahomean tribe seeks to steal human children. To prevent this children are adorned with iron bracelets or they are ritually scarred.

Bakru – These are South American faeries that are created by magick. They consist partly of wood.

Uldra – These Lapland faeries live underground. They tend to keep watch over hibernating animals. They are also kindly disposed towards the Sami herders who herd reindeer across their territory.

Abatwa – These tiny South African faeries live amiably inside anthills with ants. It is said that if a women who is 7 months pregnant sees an Abatwa, that the unborn child will be a boy.

Bergmoncks – These are German faeries that appear as pale faced monks. They chase people away from gold mines. It is thought that these faeries are the spirits of monks who had hidden church gold inside the mines.

Ahl Al-Trab – These faeries come from Arabic folklore. They are said to be tiny and live beneath the sands of the Sahara desert. They are very mischievous in that they get camels riled up, raise sandstorms and drain oases before a caravan arrives to use it.

Weles – They are Polish faeries who guard animals.

Fantine – These gentle Swiss faeries bring good weather to farmers. It is said that they introduced the idea of the cow bell to keep cows from getting lost.

Yumboes – These West African faeries are said to be very hospitable towards humans. They are about two feet tall with pearly skin and silvery hair. They live beneath the hills of Senegal. Their servants are said to be invisible except for their hands and feet. The Yumboes enjoy dining and dancing, often inviting humans to join them.

Ahuizotl – This Aztec water faery is a cross between a dog and a monkey and it has a human hand at the end of its tail. It lures unsuspecting people into the water where it devours them. It is found in Mexico.

Deevs – These evil Persian faeries are found in the Zorastrian religion. Their ruler is Arzshenk. And they are always at war with the good Persian faeries known as Peries.

Macinghe – This dangerous Sicilian wind faery has a reputation for violating human women. He is one of the Folletti.

Shinsee – They are generally friendly Chinese faeries who are found deep in the mountains and forests. They manifest as old men with long beards or as young maidens wandering in the moonlight.

Vihans – Are Gallic faeries who stand guard over standing stones.

Pilosi – These nature faeries are from ancient Gaul. They appeared as hairy men with the legs and feet of goats. A horseshoe was nailed to the hearth to make them feel welcome.

Tras – is a Bohemian faery who is known to come bursting out of the forest in order to attack humans.

 

Quiz:

1. Joulupukki is a Finnish faery that delivers _____.

2. Bergmoncks are German faeries who appear as pale faced _______.

3. Shinsee are found deep in the _________ and ________.

4. Weles are Polish faeries who guard ________.

5. Agogwe are __________ faeries.

6. The Abatwa live with ____.

7. Bokwus are found in Fir and _______ forests

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course

Whispering Woods Faery Course: Lesson Eight – Faery Kings and Queens

Whispering Woods Faery Course

Lesson Eight

Faery Kings and Queens

 

While some faeries are solitaire and live off to themselves, there are thosewho live in faery communities. As the title suggests, following are some of the Kings and Queens of these faery gatherings.

Abundia (Wandering Dame) – She is known as the queen of the Normandy faeries in Northern France. She appears as a beautiful woman with dark hair, wearing a tiara with a star in the middle.

Kubera (Dhanapati) – The king of Alaka, the magickal kingdom of the Himalayan faeries (Yakshas). He is also known as the Hindu God of Wealth. He often appears as a pot-bellied dwarf.

Alba (Turanna) – She is the queen of the Tuscan faeries of central Italy.

Bebo – According to Irish legend, Bebo was the wife of Iubdann and the faery queen of the realm of the Faylinn (Fairyland).

Queen summer – She rules the Native American faeries known as the Elves of Light.

Breasil – According to Irish legend, Breasil is the King of the world and the ruler of the faery island of Hy-Breasil (Otherworld).

Iubdan – He is the husband of Bebo and King of the realm of the Faylinn.

Ana (Nourishment) – She is the Roman gypsy queen of the Keshalyi faeries. Legend has it that she was forced to marry the King of the underworld demons known as Locolico. She eventually was granted her freedom and now lives in a secluded castle. She makes rare appearances as a golden toad.

Basadone – Is a Lord of the Northern Italy faeries. He is known as the “woman-kisser”, because he rides the noonday breezes and steals kisses as he passes by.

Raja Jinn Peri – He is the King of the Fairies who reside in Malaysia.

Mucalinda – King of the Hindu water faeries known as the Nagas. He appears as a giant serpent and is accredited with saving the life of the Buddha.

Dagda – He is known as the first King of the Irish faery race known as the Tuatha De Danann.

Musail – He is the Russian King of the Forest faeries who are themselves associated with the Rowan trees.

Oonagh – She is the Queen of the Daoine Sidhe in county Tipperary. She is the wife of King Finvarra.

Donn – He is the faery King of “Knockfierna” in county Limerick. He is also known as the ancient Celtic god of the Dead who rules the rocky islands to the south west on the Atlantic coast.

Cliodna – She is known as the faery Queen of South Munster Ireland. She is said to be the most beautiful woman in the world. She is the sister of Aoibheall. She is often accompanied by three magickal birds. The O’Keefe clan claims Cliodna as their family banshee.

Gyre-Carlin – She is the Queen of the fairies in the Fyfe area of Scotland.

Fand (Pearl of Beauty) – In Celtic myth Fand is a faery queen, who was once married to the sea god Manannan. Fand appears in the Ulster Cycle tale, Serglige Con Culainn (The Sickbed of Cúchulainn). She is also mentioned in the Táin Bó Cúailnge (the Cattle Raid of Cooley).

Snow Queen – She is the faery Queen of Denmark who travels in the blizzards blown from the Arctic wastes. The Snow Queen will entice mortal men to follow her, but to be loved by her means instant death.

 

Quiz:

1. Iubdan is the husband of _____.

2. Abundia is known as the queen of the __________ faeries.

3. The first King of the Tuatha De Danann was _______.

4. Cliodna is often accompanied by three magickal _______.

5. Mucalinda is King of the Hindu water faeries known as the ______.

6. Kubera is the King of ______.

7. Ana is the Roman gypsy queen of the _______ faeries.

 

 

Whispering Woods Faery Lore course