Promising You, We Will Definitely See You Tomorrow! Till then….

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Gemstone of the Day for November 3rd is Benitoite

Gemstone of the Day

Benitoite

                       
                                                              
Benitoite is named for its occurrence near the headwaters of the San Benito River in San Benito County, California.

Hardness: 6 – 6.5        
Specific Gravity: 3.6        
Chemistry: BaTiSi3O9, Barium Titanium Silicate                
Class: Silicates                
Crystallography: Hexagonal; bar 6 m 2           
Cleavage: poor       
Fracture: irregular                    
Streak: white                    
Luster: vitreous


Healing: Benitoite is used to treat disorders of the blood and to ameliorate excessive bleeding. It is also used to expedite the healing process.

Workings: Benitoite is used for astral traveling and connecting with other-world beings. Benitoit is worn to enhance feelings of emotional sensitivity, empathy and understanding. It aids in instances of telepathy. Benitoite is used to help one overcome one’s fear of water. 
Benitoite is associated with the astrological sign of Virgo and vibrates to the number 9.

Chakra Applications: Benitoite is associated with all of the chakras.

Foot Notes: Benitoite is a rare blue barium titanium silicate mineral, found in hydrothermally altered serpentinite. Benitoite is thought to have been derived during a phase of low temperature and high-pressure metamorphism which relates to a blueschist metamorphic facies. The elements that comprise benitoite are thought to have been mobilized from the host rock and deposited in a late stage cooling of hydrothermal fluids in veins fracturing the wall rock of serpentine.
Source:
Author: Crick

Herb of the Day for November 3rd is Licorice

Herb of the Day

Licorice


(Glycyrrhiza glabra)

Medicinal Uses: Licorice is used to relieve respiratory ailments such as allergies, bronchitis,
colds, sore throats, and tuberculosis. Licorice root is often used to prevent and treat stomach
ulcers. Licorice is also used in the treatment of heart disease because of its effects on
cholesterol and blood pressure. It has also been used for over 3,000 years by the Chinese as
a tonic to rejuvenate the heart and spleen, and as a treatment for ulcers, cold symptoms,
and skin disorders.
Licorice is used in treating adrenal insufficiencies such as hypoglycemia and Addison’s disease, counteracting stress, and in purifying the liver and bloodstream.

Persons with a history of congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and liver disorders should not use licorice compounds. Do not use if you are pregnant or nursing.

Magickal uses:

Properties: Licorice is demulcent, expectorant, diuretic, and laxative. It contains glycosides, flavonoids, asparagine, isoflavonoids, chalcones and coumarins. Primary of these is Glycyrrhetinic acid, a natural anti-inflammatory compound.
Licorice Root contains Vitamins E, B-complex, phosphorous, biotin, niacin, pantothenic acid, lecithin, manganese, iodine, chromium, and zinc.

Growth: Licorice is a mediterranean perennial plant having blue flowers, pinnately compound leaves, and a sweet, distinctively flavored root.
Source:
Author: Crick

Deity of the Day for November 3rd is Hades

Deity of the Day

Hades

 

In Greek mythology and legend, Hades is known as the god of the underworld. A brother of Zeus, when the world got split up into portions after the overthrow of their father, the Titan Cronos, Hades didn’t exactly get the best deal. While Zeus became king of Olympus, and their brother Poseidon won domain over the sea, Hades got stuck with the land of the underworld. Because he’s unable to get out much, and doesn’t get to spend a lot of time with those who are still living, Hades focuses on increasing the underworld’s population levels whenever he can.

Although he is the ruler of the dead, it’s important to distinguish that Hades is not the god of death  – that title actually belongs to the god Thanatos.

Hades’ best-known legend may well be his role in the tale of Persephone and her mother, the grain goddess Demeter. Persephone caught the eye of Hades, who took her back to the underworld, and Demeter’s grief caused the crops on earth to die. By the time Persephone got back to her mother, she had eaten six pomegranate seeds, and so was doomed to spend six months of the year in the underworld. In a few modern, more sanitized versions of the story, Persephone is not held against her will but chooses to stay there for six months each year so that she can bring light to the souls doomed to spend eternity with Hades.

This rendering of the tale, however, does not seem to have much scholarly or academic evidence supporting it.

Hades also features prominently in the adventures of Hercules, or Herakles, and they battled each other several times. Hades presides over funeral rites, and those who are laid to rest with the proper rituals and ceremonies are welcome in the underworld. After death, the souls of those who have died must meet the ferryman, Charon, at the River Styx.

Once they have paid Charon for passage, they cross the Styx, and the Acheron, known as the river of woe, on their way to the underworld. Those who couldn’t or wouldn’t pay Charon – or whose bodies were not properly prepared and buried – were doomed to wander the land of the living, haunting the shores of the river for a hundred years.

Of note, Hades’ name has become a synonym for the realm of the underworld. So we have Hades the god, who rules Hades the place. The name, Hades, actually means invisible – in one legend, Hades was given a helmet of invisibility by the Cyclops, to use in the battle against the Titans.

He is typically portrayed as a dark, bearded man holding a pickaxe or staff that he uses to drive shadows ahead of him, as well as the key to the underworld. Hades is often accompanied by the black horses who pull his chariot, and his loyal watchdog, the three-headed Cerberus.

Interestingly, in addition to being a god of the underworld, Hades is also associated with the treasures held within the earth itself – gold, silver, and other mined bounty, as well as the seed-crops that flourish in the soil. Because of this, he is sometimes seen as a god of wealth and riches. Plato refers to Hades as Pluton, the giver of wealth. In Roman mythology and legend, Pluto has similar aspects to Hades.

References in pop culture include the role of Hades, as hilariously voiced by James Woods, in the Disney animated film Hercules, and the portrayal of Cerberus as a very large dog named Fluffy in the Harry Potter films. In the Percy Jackson movies, Hades is played by British comedian Steve Coogan, and he also makes a brief appearance in Jim Butcher’s Harry Dresden series, in the book Skin Game. Hades appears in countless video games, including the God of War franchise, the Final Fantasy series, and Age of Empires.

 

 

Source:

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Seeking Venus under the Spitzkoppe Arch

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2015 November 3

Seeking Venus under the Spitzkoppe Arch
Image Credit & Copyright: Petr Horálek; Rollover Annotation: Judy Schmidt

Explanation: What’s that in the sky? Although there was much to see in this spectacular panorama taken during the early morning hours of a day in late September, the brightest object in the sky was clearly the planet Venus. In the featured image, Venus was captured actually through a natural rock bridge, itself picturesque, in Spitzkoppe, Namibia. The planet, on the left of the opening, was complemented by a silhouette of the astrophotographer on the right. Above and beyond the rock bridge were many famous icons of a dark night sky, including, from left to right, the Pleiades star cluster, the Orion Nebula, the bright star Sirius, and the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This week, Venus remains visible to the east in the pre-dawn sky, being complemented by Mars, which is angularly quite close.

Your Daily Planet Tracker: Moon in Leo, Nov 2, 2015 to Nov 4, 2015

Planet Tracker

Moon in Leo

Nov 2, 2015 to Nov 4, 2015

The lions are out today. Stand in the Sun and shake loose your mane. Leo is exuberant, courageous, playful and full of heart. It’s a Moontime that inspires heroic feats. What makes a hero? A crazy willingness to do what only you can do. I like how Bob Dylan sang it, “If I’d paid attention to what others were thinking, the heart in me would have died. But I was much too stubborn to ever be governed by enforced insanity. Someone had to reach for the rising star, I guess it was up to me.” More often we’re like that proverbial cartoon figure, momentarily gliding on air, ten stories high, then plummeting the minute we realize what we’re doing-self-consciousness and pride spoil the show. Avoid those egos squaring off around you. Lose yourself in the spontaneity of the moment. Be innocent and happy as a child. Play will nourish your heart.

 

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