The Nature of Black and White Magick

The Nature of Black and White Magick

Author: Gentle Deer Lion Tamer

Let me begin with the premise that all magickal operation is identical. The energy used in “Black Magic” is the exact same energy used in “White Magic”. It is not the kind of energy or the source of the energy used that separates one form of magick from another, but rather, it is the intent (the specified outcome) of the magick as programmed by the practitioner that determines the black or white aspect of the magick.

These five steps include; desire, intent, alignment, ritual and expectation. Intent is the steering wheel of the magickal operation. It is the aspect of the magickal operation that actually “programs” or dictates how the expected outcome of the magick will come into manifestation, exactly what the magick is to do, the manner in which it will be accomplished (if required), and what is to transpire at the completion of the magick (how the energy used in the magick will be dissipated at the conclusion of the work).

So, lets look at the difference between “Black” and “White” magick.

In this world, my disincarnate mentors told me, there are Two Great Laws of Interaction. These Two Great Laws constitute the basis by which we can easily discern “Black Magic” from “White Magick”, and the corresponding creation of “karma” (the eternal negative consequences of our mortal behavior) when eternal laws are broken. The Two Great Laws state:

1. You shall not deliberately, maliciously, with forethought and intent, injure another on any level or plane of mortal association – mentally, physically, emotionally, or spiritually. This law also includes murder.

2. You shall not deliberately, maliciously, with forethought and intent, deprive another of their “free agency” (the right and ability to make decisions relating to the path and destiny of one’s life).

Although you may at times do things, which inadvertently violate one of these laws, the lack of deliberation, malice, and intent negates the karmic aspect. In the case of inadvertent violations, this is called “experience”. We are all here to experience life and its associated trials and difficulties, most of which we either bring upon someone or ourselves creates for us. That’s just part of life, and necessary to our growth and evolution.

Only when the specified conditions of deliberate, malicious intent with forethought stated in the Two Great Laws is violated have we crossed the line, and eternal consequences and retribution are mandated.

There are, of course, always natural consequences to the decisions that we make. That again is part of our mortal learning process, but natural consequences do not have eternal ramifications. Natural consequences are contained within this mortal experience and are here to teach us the lessons inherent in mortality.

When we pass beyond the bounds of this lifetime, we take the knowledge and wisdom of our experiences with us, and hopefully, leave the highly charged emotional aspects of the experience behind. It is, however, this highly charged emotional aspect of the experience that imprints the experience within our memory and makes it a lasting part of our life.

Using the Two Great Laws as our guide, can we say that “White Magic” is any magickal operation that does not violate either of the Two Great Laws and that “Black Magic” is any magickal operation that does violate either of the Two Great Laws? Simply put, yes. However, let’s look at this further.

In Central and South America, there are three broad categories of sorcerers. These three broad categories broken down into their individual components may make our study much easier. The first category is called “curandera” or “curandero”, depending on the gender, and means “curer” (healer). This is an individual trained in healing and other magickal operations frequently referred to as “white magick”.

The second category is that of “bruja” or “brujo”. This is someone known to practice the “black arts”, or what is perceived as the negative use of magick. This sorcerer is usually widely known and feared. He/she specializes in death, disease and misfortune. In some areas of the world, and within certain cultures, this practice can be very widespread.

The final category is that of “shaman”. A shaman is essentially a bridge between the “currandera” and the “bruja”. The shaman is equally versed in the white and black arts, and understands that the basis of all magickal operation is identical. It is the practitioner that determines the course and outcome of his/her work.

The shaman knows that greatest source of available power for magickal operation resides in the dark side of human nature. Like the “bruja”, the shaman has walked the deep, dark depths of his/her soul and has confronted his/her own demons. His/her reality has been systematically destroyed and rebuilt upon an entirely different foundation.

The shaman knows that balance is the key to power and magick, and that balance requires that the shaman be able to walk equally as far into the darkness as into the light. The shaman, unlike the curandera or the bruja, is willing to cross the line between black and white, at will, without reservation or hesitation to keep the balance. Like the “Heyoka” of Oglala (what most non-Native Americans refer to as the Sioux Indians) tradition, the shaman is the sliding balance of power on the scale of Light and Dark.

CASE STUDY

Many years ago I had a friend who had a “VooDoo” doll brought to her to be destroyed. The doll was found in a drawer buried under a pile of towels in the beauty parlor of a young woman recently and suddenly deceased. The relatives, unaware of the nature of the doll, thought it was strangely unique and grotesquely fascinating, and took it home, where it found its new home on the nightstand next to the master bed.

As the story was related to me, over the next several months, the husband suffered a heart attack, the family was involved in multiple automobile accidents, and the general atmosphere of the home and the owners’ lives had taken a very dark and dismal turn. The couple finally traced the origin of their disasters back to about the time the doll was brought home. The doll was then passed to another relative with equally dismal results. And so it went until it was finally brought to my friend to be disempowered and destroyed.

This may be a classic case of “black magick”, in that it may constitute the misuse of negative magickal power, or there may be circumstances in the lives of the victims and the perpetrator of which we are unaware. Either way, it will serve as an excellent case study for our purposes. Two things are very apparent about the creator of this doll.

The first is that whoever created and empowered this doll was ready, willing and able to do so with deadly precision. The second is that the Creator of this doll either intended to hurt as many people as possible, perhaps as an act of terrorism, or this was very sloppy workmanship in the doll’s programming, because at the conclusion of its mission, presumably to kill the beauty salon owner, the doll was not programmed to realize its work was accomplished and dissipate the energy. It continued to exercise its program on anyone who unwittingly came into its presence.

No Master Sorcerer would leave such a blatant error. This was either a deliberate act of uncontained terrorism or the work of a proficient but sloppy sorcerer.

Magick is an art. Like the great masters of any field, every Master Sorcerer has an identifiable signature on his work. Meticulous workmanship is the hallmark of a Master, and his signature commands respect. One does not have to be a Master Sorcerer to practice magick, however, anyone who does must be prepared for the consequences of their creations.

So, is every use of magick to produce death, disease, or misfortune an act of “Black Magick”? Absolutely not! In our society, is every homicide a murder? Absolutely not!

One of the prime functions of the negative use of magick in primitive settings was the use of death, disease and misfortune directed against hostile neighbors and invaders as an accepted means of self-defense. Does the use of negative magick for self-defense purposes appear to violate the Two Great Laws? Yes, there is malice, forethought and intent to kill, injure or otherwise incapacitate another.

Malice is defined as the desire to harm another. Forethought is defined as “deliberate, with planning before hand”. And intent is defined as the aim or the goal of one’s actions. However, this is where the difference lies.

When someone comes against us, as the aggressor, with intent to harm, kill, or take away our free agency, they have broken the Law and we have every right to use any means at or disposal, including magick, to defend ourselves and all that is within the bounds of our stewardship, as long as we are not the aggressors.

Therefore, we can now see that the use of lethal magick does not necessarily constitute “black magic”.

By process of elimination, we can now define “black magic” as the unprovoked, aggressive use of negative magick. Negative magick can be defined as any act of magick that violates one or both of the Two Great Laws, the result of which will incur karmic debt. I believe this to be the best definition of “black magick” that I am aware of, taking into consideration all the possible complexities and ramifications.

So why would anyone want to practice black magick?

As a universal aspect of human nature, greed and power seem to rule the list of mortal weaknesses. The strong dominate the weak, bringing them into physical or psychological bondage, forcing their allegiance and cooperation to whatever end is desired.

To accomplish this, there does not seem to be any greater instrument of bondage than the fear generated from the use or apparent use of the supernatural, and thus, magick.

One of the most powerful lessons I learned in my studies with Medicine people among Native Americans is that it does not matter what reality may truly be. If the people believe it is real or they can be convinced that it is real, it is real. Again, our individual illusion of reality prevails.

So, to the medicine people, sorcerers, shamans and witches of the world, illusion is everything. This is not to negate what they truly are capable of.

Many of you will remember the highly successful psychic surgeon in the Philippines, who, when subjected to Western scrutiny, was found to be using chicken fat and raw meat in place of human malignant tumors. But to his patients, convinced of his skill and supernatural ability, this surgeon had a successful recovery rate second to none. Why? Because he successfully altered his patients’ illusion of reality about their medical condition so completely that the fabric of reality was altered in conformity to the patients’ belief.

Let me repeat that one more time; HE SUCCESSFULLY ALTERED HIS PATIENTS’ ILLUSION OF REALITY ABOUT THEIR MEDICAL CONDITION SO COMPLETELY THAT THE FABRIC OF REALITY WAS ALTERED IN CONFORMITY TO THE PATIENTS’ BELIEF.

Believe it or not, there it is. Your illusion of reality is your reality, and your illusion of reality, when coupled with consistent belief and strong emotion, can alter the fabric of reality. How did we originally define magick? The ability of a mortal human to alter the fabric of reality in conformity with and in proportion to will and intent. I had a great deal to learn while working with Chief Two Trees in North Carolina, when I failed to truly grasp the power of a person’s belief system to change reality. Fortunately for me, I stayed on came away wiser than most.

THOUGHT FORMS, POPPETS AND BRAINWASHING

Now that we have finally defined “black magic”, how does it work?

Method Number One: Some forms of black magic are nothing more than an effective form of brainwashing. For instance, I, being the powerful sorcerer, instill within your illusion of reality that, should you ever disobey my rules, you will immediately be struck blind. If I, like the psychic surgeon, can create such a total belief, and you knowing break one of my rules, the mental and psychological stress of that knowledge can and will produce the desired effect.

However, it is your reaction to my suggestion that caused the blindness, not any direct action on my part. This is the power of the voodoo death curse – whether someone has actually had the death chant sung on him or her, or whether a person just believes it is so, the end result is usually the same.

Method Number Two: This method actually requires the sorcerer to perform magick and is usually used in situations where insufficient time or contact prevents brainwashing. This method requires the creation of a manifest thought form. In other words, the sorcerer stirs himself/herself into a frenzy of anger and hatred, and then focuses that power into the creation of an etheric being of the same nature.

Once the manifest thought form takes shape, it is programmed with the exact specifications of the magickal operation. This includes whom to strike, how to strike, what to strike with, and at the completion of the magickal operation, the manner in which the manifest thought form would be returned to its former state. In my experience, the programming is primarily accomplished through emotionally charged visualization. Once all the preparations are complete, and only then, the manifest thought form is sent on its way.

It is at this point that a master sorcerer will initiate additional magickal work to protect himself/herself from the possibility that the entity might somehow be returned to its creator to execute its malicious task there. When every possibility and contingency have been accounted for and covered, the sorcerer bides his time, possibly continuing to fuel the fire as required.

Method Number Three: This is basically the same as Method Number Two, except that the manifest thought form is projected into a physical object, any physical object. In the case of our earlier study, the physical object is a grotesque doll, most probably a doll whose image is used each time this individual’s magic is performed, such that, this doll is the “business card” of this sorcerer.

The next step in this process is to plant this physical object inconspicuously in the immediate presence of the victim. This aspect of physical presence in the victim’s immediate proximity is based on the belief that the physical object can more effectively hold and retain the focus of the power right under the victim’s nose, all the while, executing its program.

The individual who practices “black magick”, bringing pain and misfortune to others, is every bit as cold, calculating and eminently capable as any “hit man”. These individuals are feared and respected wherever they work, for very good reason. The use or threat of black magic against you or anyone you know is not a threat to be taken lightly. But these individuals are not infallible or immune to their own magick.

I am personally aware of one individual who became the victim of his own evil deeds. Should you ever believe yourself or another to be the intended victim of black magic, history has shown that your disbelief in their “religion”, “black magic” or the sorcerer’s individual capabilities will not shield you from the intended effects.

History has also shown that your particular religious association, beliefs, or faithfulness will not protect you. These misconceptions actually add to the effectiveness of the sorcerers work. By virtue of your false sense of immunity, and the elapsed time it takes to realize your error, the effects may already be working.

Black magick is very much like cancer. If you contracted cancer, disbelief in the cancer will not save your life, neither will your religious associations, beliefs, or faithfulness. It has been my experience that the actual victims of black magick usually have some knowledge that a potentially hostile situation exists, that the opposition may escalate the confrontation, and that by tradition or desperation they may resort to unorthodox measures.

Awareness is the key to survival in this life. Awareness is the key to dealing with black magic. You must arm yourself with all the knowledge possible and seek immediate expert assistance. Like cancer, time and expert help are critical. People just don’t want to believe or accept that they have cancer, so frequently by the time they take action, it is too late.

I do not personally practice black magic, although, I will not hesitate to meet force with force. I have, however, been called upon many times over the past ten years to assist others who have become the target of etheric terrorism and black magic. I sincerely hope that the information presented here was both understandable as well as useful.

Love and Blessings,

Dale

Gentle Deer Lion Tamer

_______________________________

Footnotes:
Magick, White and Black Magick

WOTC Extra – The Magick of Everyday Things

WOTC Extra – The Magick of Everyday Things

 

Our notions of what traditionally constituted black, white, and gray were incorrect. The practitioners of ancient magick were not necessarily working on a specific ethical basis at all. What was once under the guise of “white” magick (like herbalism) is now being usurped by technology, science, and medicine. In many areas of daily life, we find ourselves turning to a reliable procedure and trusting in it, while we overlook the spiritual portion of the equation. For example, a dam might help direct a mighty river, but without putting a spiritual covenant in place with that river, the spirits of that place might break that dam. We can call our technology “good,” and we can call our magick “white,” but unless we honor all aspects of the equation to which we’re applying our power, we will fall short and feel that lingering resonance (kind of like an itch you can’t scratch).

Historical references aside, it would be naïve to say that evil does not exist. The law of balance requires that for there to be “good,” there must also be the proverbial “bad.” Today we say that a person who uses black magick or walks the left-hand path is considered to be working from a selfish or malevolent vantage point. In Lewis Spence’s Encyclopedia of the Occult we read:

To gain limitless power of god, demon, and man; for personal aggrandizement and glorification; to cheat, trick and mock; to gratify base appetites; to aid religious jealousies and bigotries; to satisfy public and private enmities; to further political intrigue; to encompass disease, calamity and death—these were the ends and aims of black magic.

For a person to exhibit this type of behavior externally in any realm of life, he or she would have to have that darkness as part of their makeup (the within) according to this concept. However, the question remains as to what is truly “black” and what’s required necessary to raise that kind of energy. Some practitioners, for example, categorize working with entropy (the tendency of an energy system toward inertness through the breakdown of organized structure and pattern) or chaos energies as “black.” It receives this designation because, superficially, this so-called magick has the opposite effect from white (destroying or decreasing instead of creating). Yet the forces of nature perform these same functions. This makes us ask: if a form of energy exists in nature, can we call it “black”? Nature’s pattern is eat or be eaten, which can seem very cruel. But, again, it is only illustrating balance. Some “black” magicians would reply that they, too, are illustrating the law of nature in becoming the predator instead of the prey, or in being protectively proactive (doing everything possible mundanely and magickally to safeguard that which they hold dear).

Since we are also animals, humans exhibit similar instincts. Yet, somehow we expect that our reasoning nature will suddenly take that instinct and put it neatly away like some toy that we’ve outgrown when we work magick. I’m not sure that’s a wholly reasonable expectation, let alone a truly healthy one. Instead, a holistic approach would be to balance helpful instincts with rational thought and spiritual guidance.

Let’s take this one step further, out of nature and into the divine realms. In the world’s mythologies, we see images of gods and goddesses that take revenge against those who harm their followers (or children). We also see gods and goddesses that destroy to create. Kali (the Hindu Creatrix/Destroyer) comes immediately to mind. If the external divine uses the energy of reversal or diminishing, can that truly be called “black,” or is it merely the universe’s checks and balances? These are not easy ethical questions to consider or answer, but an honest examination of two things may help us gain some perspective—namely, intent (the internal motivating source) and the situation (the externals).

Let’s say someone chooses to cast spells aimed specifically at exacting revenge because their family had been targeted by a person or a group. This would be considered gray magick, because it is a situation when an ill has been done and has not been balanced.

Now, the sender may not enjoy the feeling of that magick. There’s a natural lingering temptation to lash out with unbridled anger and lose all focus. However, if similar circumstances occurred again, many people would be hard pressed not to do likewise. We simply want to protect those we love. Also, it is possible that people would feel inaction on their part would dishonor a sense of inner sacredness, and that sometimes we are the hand of karma (just as anything in life’s network might be).

This is where the lines of black and white get blurred. You’re not alone in facing a struggle between personal and spiritual ethics, potential karmic repercussions, and the natural desire to act . . . to do something, anything, to return the situation to a more equitable equation. It’s part of human nature. If you find yourself in such a place consider the following advice:

Always step back and cool off. Any magickal working is going to go better when you’re thinking clearly.

Ask yourself if there is a mundane alternative that could fix things. You can often use the energy generated by a bad situation to turn things around in your favor.

Always make sure you know (beyond any doubt) the focus of the spell. Otherwise you could harm an innocent person.

Consider using a “universal clause” (like “for the greatest good” or “and it harm none”) so that no one on the edges of the situation gets harmed by the energy you’re creating.

Pattern your response to only visit like for like (no embellishing—think balance).

Continue personal efforts on the mundane level to rectify things and put your life in order. This gives the universe more opportunities to open doors, heal wounds, and provide closure.

For a good book that discusses this subject in more detail than this book’s space allows, try How to Be a Wicked Witch. Let’s talk a bit about action and inaction and situational ethics.

 

 

A Witch’s 10 Commandments: Magickal Guidelines for Everyday Life

Marian Singer

 

Let’s Talk Witch – The Magick of Everyday Things

Winter Images

The Magick of Everyday Things

 

Our notions of what traditionally constituted black, white, and gray were incorrect. The practitioners of ancient magick were not necessarily working on a specific ethical basis at all. What was once under the guise of “white” magick (like herbalism) is now being usurped by technology, science, and medicine. In many areas of daily life, we find ourselves turning to a reliable procedure and trusting in it, while we overlook the spiritual portion of the equation. For example, a dam might help direct a mighty river, but without putting a spiritual covenant in place with that river, the spirits of that place might break that dam. We can call our technology “good,” and we can call our magick “white,” but unless we honor all aspects of the equation to which we’re applying our power, we will fall short and feel that lingering resonance (kind of like an itch you can’t scratch).

 

Historical references aside, it would be naïve to say that evil does not exist. The law of balance requires that for there to be “good,” there must also be the proverbial “bad.” Today we say that a person who uses black magick or walks the left-hand path is considered to be working from a selfish or malevolent vantage point. In Lewis Spence’s Encyclopedia of the Occult we read:

 

To gain limitless power of god, demon, and man; for personal aggrandizement and glorification; to cheat, trick and mock; to gratify base appetites; to aid religious jealousies and bigotries; to satisfy public and private enmities; to further political intrigue; to encompass disease, calamity and death—these were the ends and aims of black magic.

 

For a person to exhibit this type of behavior externally in any realm of life, he or she would have to have that darkness as part of their makeup (the within) according to this concept. However, the question remains as to what is truly “black” and what’s required necessary to raise that kind of energy. Some practitioners, for example, categorize working with entropy (the tendency of an energy system toward inertness through the breakdown of organized structure and pattern) or chaos energies as “black.” It receives this designation because, superficially, this so-called magick has the opposite effect from white (destroying or decreasing instead of creating). Yet the forces of nature perform these same functions. This makes us ask: if a form of energy exists in nature, can we call it “black”? Nature’s pattern is eat or be eaten, which can seem very cruel. But, again, it is only illustrating balance. Some “black” magicians would reply that they, too, are illustrating the law of nature in becoming the predator instead of the prey, or in being protectively proactive (doing everything possible mundanely and magickally to safeguard that which they hold dear).

 

Since we are also animals, humans exhibit similar instincts. Yet, somehow we expect that our reasoning nature will suddenly take that instinct and put it neatly away like some toy that we’ve outgrown when we work magick. I’m not sure that’s a wholly reasonable expectation, let alone a truly healthy one. Instead, a holistic approach would be to balance helpful instincts with rational thought and spiritual guidance.

 

Let’s take this one step further, out of nature and into the divine realms. In the world’s mythologies, we see images of gods and goddesses that take revenge against those who harm their followers (or children). We also see gods and goddesses that destroy to create. Kali (the Hindu Creatrix/Destroyer) comes immediately to mind. If the external divine uses the energy of reversal or diminishing, can that truly be called “black,” or is it merely the universe’s checks and balances? These are not easy ethical questions to consider or answer, but an honest examination of two things may help us gain some perspective—namely, intent (the internal motivating source) and the situation (the externals).

 

Let’s say someone chooses to cast spells aimed specifically at exacting revenge because their family had been targeted by a person or a group. This would be considered gray magick, because it is a situation when an ill has been done and has not been balanced.

 

Now, the sender may not enjoy the feeling of that magick. There’s a natural lingering temptation to lash out with unbridled anger and lose all focus. However, if similar circumstances occurred again, many people would be hard pressed not to do likewise. We simply want to protect those we love. Also, it is possible that people would feel inaction on their part would dishonor a sense of inner sacredness, and that sometimes we are the hand of karma (just as anything in life’s network might be).

 

This is where the lines of black and white get blurred. You’re not alone in facing a struggle between personal and spiritual ethics, potential karmic repercussions, and the natural desire to act . . . to do something, anything, to return the situation to a more equitable equation. It’s part of human nature. If you find yourself in such a place consider the following advice:

 

Always step back and cool off. Any magickal working is going to go better when you’re thinking clearly.

 

Ask yourself if there is a mundane alternative that could fix things. You can often use the energy generated by a bad situation to turn things around in your favor.

 

Always make sure you know (beyond any doubt) the focus of the spell. Otherwise you could harm an innocent person.

 

Consider using a “universal clause” (like “for the greatest good” or “and it harm none”) so that no one on the edges of the situation gets harmed by the energy you’re creating.

 

Pattern your response to only visit like for like (no embellishing—think balance).

 

Continue personal efforts on the mundane level to rectify things and put your life in order. This gives the universe more opportunities to open doors, heal wounds, and provide closure.

 

 

A Witch’s 10 Commandments: Magickal Guidelines for Everyday Life

Marian Singer

How to Learn White Magic

How to Learn White Magic

White magic encompasses much more than than just spells. Where a spell is a focus of power, white magic as a whole is seen in a much broader perspective. If you are interested in learning how to perform white magic, here are some guidelines to help you get started.

Find any information available about white magic and read it, absorbing what you read. You will find that you may not always agree with what someone else has written, and that’s fine. You don’t have to. If you come across something that your heart and/or your mind rejects, discard that information.

Practice daily. Practicing magic should not be just an occasional occurence. It should be a lifestyle. Whether the ritual is as simple as stepping outside to your garden to give the Lord and Lady your thanks or as extravagant as doing an all-out spell, practicing magic on a daily basis will enable you to learn more as you go along your path.

Keep a Book of Shadows. A Book of Shadows is basically your workbook. This is where you will write down your spells and notes pertaining to any rituals you attempt. You may also consider keeping a separate diary of sorts to track your growth along the path of magic.

Recognize. Magic is all around you, whether it’s a beautiful sunset, the vision of a full moon on a fresh blanket of snow or the birth of a child. It’s up to you to recognize its value.

Meditate. Meditation will help you to obtain, and keep, an open mind.

 

Tips & Warnings

  • Usually, the main difference between white magic and black magic is the intention behind it. Make sure your intentions are good, and not self serving.

  • When you find information on white magic, understand that what you are reading is someones opinion. While it may be agreed on by many people, it is still an opinion. Sift through the information and keep what you can agree on, and discard the rest.

  • The strongest magic comes from your heart. You can’t truly practice magic if you don’t feel it, and believe it. Any spell you recite will mean nothing if it doesn’t come from your heart.

  • Do not manipulate. When you come to the point in your journey when you feel you are ready to perform spells, think before you start. If it involves someone else, how would you feel if someone did it to you? Understand that once you put something out there, by thought or deed, it’s out there and there are no “take backs” allowed. What you send out will come back on you.

Read more at eHow.com

 

A Little Humor for Your Day – “The Death of Black Magic”

The Death of Black Magic

 

An old man and woman were married for years even though they hated each other. When they had a confrontation, screams and yelling could be heard deep into the night. A constant statement was heard by the neighbors who feared the man the most. “When I die I will dig my way up and out of the grave to come back and haunt you for the rest of your life!”

They believed he practiced black magic and was responsible for missing cats and dogs, and strange sounds at all hours. He was feared and enjoyed the respect it garnished.

He died abruptly under strange circumstances and the funeral had a closed casket. After the burial, the wife went straight to the local bar and began to party as if there was no tomorrow. The gaiety of her actions were becoming extreme while her neighbors approached in a group to ask these questions: Are you not afraid? Concerned? Worried? that this man who practiced black magic and stated when he died he would dig his way up and out of the grave to come back and haunt you for the rest of your life?

The wife put down her drink and said…”let the old bastard dig. I had him buried upside down.” 

 

Source:
Jokes Warehouse.com

Witchcraft – Chapter one – Introduction to Witchcraft

Witchcraft

Chapter one – Introduction to Witchcraft

by Ilil Arbel

Your world is rational and well ordered. Science, technology and regulated business are part of it. Why bother with a subject that seems so Medieval, perhaps even obsolete?  What has Witchcraft to do with you, as you sit at your books, or at your computer?  Thinking about these threatening old tales and vague images of evil may even make you uncomfortable. Is it at all worth your time?

Very much so. No pursuit is more important than the attempt to understand one’s own self. Magic preceded psychology, and the story of Witchcraft affords a significant glimpse into the development of our minds and feelings. Somehow, in the innermost recesses of our private thoughts, something still answers the call of the ancient horns of the Wild Ride of the Fairies and witches. With all our modern achievements, we are the same beings that once huddled in dark caves. It is good to acknowledge our heritage and learn from it.

The story of the witches is as old as the story of humanity itself, as proven by prehistoric evidence. They stayed throughout the centuries, sometimes openly, sometimes underground, but always influential. They are still with us.

Unfortunately, much of what is known about Witchcraft is based on superstitious nonsense, causing a bias toward a large group of people. This is unacceptable in today’s enlightened society, when most people try avoiding bigotry and prejudice. There has never been a group of people as misunderstood as those who follow Witchcraft, or as its followers call it, the Old Religion. It is estimated that nine million people have been humiliated, tortured and murdered because the world did not comprehend their ancient way of life.

In its purest form, the Old Religion is nature worship. It is also called Wicca, or The Way of the Wise People, and the followers are far from evil – they see themselves as guardians of the Earth and servants of a nature goddess. They are connected with the seasons, the plants, the animals and the planet, and seek a balanced life. They have much in common with ecologists. True, nothing in this world is untainted, and in the long history of Witchcraft there have been those who followed Satanism, Devil worship, Black Magic, Shamanism and Voodoo, among many other cults. But besides the fact that all those disciplines profess to the ability of creating magic, they have very little in common with true Witchcraft.

Upcoming chapters will discuss these Satanic activities as well as pure Witchcraft. It is impossible to understand the history of Witchcraft without knowing something about the Dark Side of magic. But it is important to realize that they are not, and never have been, one and the same.

Naturally, a good old village witch, who had to make a living selling her products and services, was a bit of a ham. While she could simply live and work in a clean cottage full of fragrant medicinal herbs, it looked much more convincing if she had a skull and a few bones on a shelf. It wouldn’t hurt if her trusty cat was all glossy black rather than a tabby. The sound of a bubbling cauldron had a good effect. And the broom looked better if it was a bit charred by fire. The customers could imagine her flying out of her chimney, cackling gleefully to herself as the sparks almost caught the broomstick. The image was good for business.

But when the great Witch Craze began in earnest, and the witches lost their places as the village doctors to become the enemies of the Church, people no longer knew what was true and what was not. It was all a mix, anyway. Take the old broom, for instance. A witch never really rode it through the air, of course. Where did this bizarre story come from?

The answer is surprisingly simple. Witches used long, dark wooden poles to perform a special fertility dance. They rode the pole as if it was a hobbyhorse, and jumped as high into the air as possible. They believed that the higher they jumped, the better the crops could grow. Sometimes they “rode” the poles to their nightly gatherings, jumping up and down all the way. Occasionally the neighbors saw them, though they wouldn’t follow them too far, as ordinary folks were superstitious and afraid of the dark in those days. The neighbors couldn’t quite understand what the witches were doing, singing and jumping like that. Could they be preparing to take off and fly?  It seemed very likely. Of course all the witches’ doings were secretive, it was part of the Old Religion. They had to do something with this pole between festivals. So what better way to hide its purpose than to disguise it as a broom?  All you had to do was to tie a few twigs and branches around it, and there it was, ready to sweep your cottage.

The Old Religion existed since the Stone Age. In a tradition that old, there have to be some rituals and forms of worship that may not appeal to everyone. Witches are aware of it and keep their practices to themselves. With very few exceptions, such as Sybil Leek or Aleister Crowley, who for various reasons made it their business to be known openly as witches, you won’t know who they are. Secrecy is essential, because even in today’s enlightened society, with all the laws against witches repealed, the presence of a witch still produces anxiety in a community, sometimes even direct persecution. Imagine if suddenly it becomes known in your hometown that the owner of the grocery store, or the plumber, or the lawyer who lives across the street, is a practicing witch. Imagine if it is your doctor, or the principal of your school. They will not be burned at the stake, of course. But the town, most likely, will either stop using their services or demand their resignation. It has happened many times.

The secrecy makes it difficult for those who have an open mind and truly want to understand. Who are these elusive people?  What do they really believe in?  Where have they originated?  Do they have inherited traits, giving them paranormal, psychic powers?  Do they cause harm to anyone?  One thing is clear. From our earliest history, from the very beginning, the witches have been with us.

There are certain caves, at archaeological sites dating 30,000 BCE, located in the regions between Russia and Spain. On the walls, and even on the ceilings of some of them, there are many carvings and paintings of easily recognizable animals, mostly bisons, antelopes, horses, bulls and deer. They are beautifully and realistically executed in both black and colored scenes. The artists were good observers and could draw the animals with amazing accuracy. However, there is also a repeated representation of a mysterious creature, who could not have possibly roamed the plains with the animals. He is half man, half animal. His face is human, but he has large horns adorning his head. He is covered with fur and has a tail, but he stands upright and his feet and hands are human. His eyes are large, sad, wise and very human. Many archaeologists agree that he is the image of a sorcerer or witch, a powerful member of an ancient pagan religion. His followers probably believed that he was a “shape changer,” a man who could make magic and change at will to an animal form. This school of archaeology believes that Western Witchcraft is a continuation of this pagan religion.

Other theories are a lot less likely and if considered each by itself, only partially explain the complicated origin of Witchcraft. Some people believe that witches were indeed in league with the Devil. This is an outdated, primitive approach, particularly for those with a scientific turn of mind, and a healthy skepticism about the existence of such an entity as the Devil.

Another theory is based on the belief that all the witches’ activities are based on nothing but hallucinations. Smearing their bodies with hallucinogenic drugs could account for flying dreams, images of savage demons and other interesting details of their Sabbaths. Undoubtedly some covens did use drugs. There will be a chapter in this book, devoted to the flora and fauna associated with Witchcraft, and it must be admitted right here that not all plants were grown just for healing. Belladonna, Monkshood, Datura, and Nightshade were often used at the festivals, and they were hallucinogenic when properly prepared. But they were only a small part of the activities, mostly recreational in nature or an aid to altered states of consciousness. Dismissing the entire proceedings as hallucinogenic dreams is, at best, an oversimplification of a very complex subject.

Another important theory is the connection between Western witches and the Fairies, Pixies, and other “Little People” of Europe. Combining this theory with the one about the ancient, Stone Age religion may explain, once and for all, where witches come from.

There are many races of pygmies living in the world today. Some examples are the pygmies of Africa, Malaysia, New Guinea and The Philippines. The pattern of their lives is similar – they are generally pushed around by their bigger neighbors. As a defense, they develop a secretive lifestyle. They are usually great hunters, almost magically able to stalk and attract their prey. They possess poison arrows which they can shoot with uncanny accuracy. They move with such agility and stealth that it seems as if they can be invisible at will. Their neighbors invariably think they have magic powers. The pygmies are hostile, in general, but if well treated may become friendly, and share their knowledge of herbs, hunting and weather patterns, or even leave gifts or exchange goods with their neighbors. Powerful enemies, faithful friends, always acting under the cover of the dark night, no matter where they live.

Races like that existed in Europe. There are old rock dwellings in the Isle of Man, Ireland, Scotland, Finland, and Russia in which you had to be about two to three feet tall to fit comfortably if standing upright. While individuals of this height exist, of course, there is no whole nation left in Europe today that is of this stature, so these dwellings provide an important clue.

Let’s review the origin of witches in the British Isles as an example. When the various invaders, such as the Romans, Saxons, and Normans entered the area, they encountered these small people. They gave them various names – Fairies, Pixies, Sidhe, and so on. Some names still have a meaning for us today. The term Pixie, for instance, is derived from Picts, a well-known old race from Northern England and Scotland. Other name origins are obscure. As usual, the Little People were hostile to their conquerors. They stole cattle and destroyed crops, resenting the fact that they were driven away from the best lands. But some friendships occurred, too, sometimes even leading to marriages between the invaders and the larger of the Little People.

Having a “Fairy wife” was a good thing. The ladies may have been small in stature, but they were very clever and pretty, and sometimes brought not only superior knowledge of the region and its natural resources, but also wealth. A very happy marriage occurred as late as 1380 A.D. between the chief of the MacLeod Clan in Scotland and a noble Fairy, who gave him a famous gift, the Fairy Flag of Dunvegan. It still exists in a Museum. Many of the descendants of this marriage live today. There are also tales of Roman, Saxon or Norman girls who ran away to become the wives of the King of the Fairies or his Lords. It was believed these women led wonderful, long lives in Fairyland, away from the toil and trouble of our “ordinary” world. These enchanting folktales will be discussed in a chapter devoted to the great literary figures in Witchcraft.

Some of the Little People lived in tiny rounded houses made of wood. There were no windows, only a smoke hole in the ceiling, admitting a delicate twilight into the room. The roof was rounded, too, and covered with sod. In spring, under the gentle rains and soft sunlight of the region, the houses sprouted grass. From a little distance, the grass made the houses look exactly like small green hills. You could get in through a door on the side of the house, but also through the smoke hole in the ceiling, which was usually equipped with a ladder for the convenience of the sentries. So the big neighbors could see the Little People going in and out of the side of the so-called hills, or go down a smoking chimney. How easy it was to make up stories about the mysterious Little People, the Sidhe, who lived inside hills and disliked sunlight. Even more important, how obvious is the origin of the story of a flying witch that could get in and out of a house through the chimney!  After all, if she didn’t fly, how else could she get to the roof?  An old hag like her surely couldn’t climb so high?

The Romans mingled with the Little People and had many descendants. These Roman-Britons stayed after the Romans left. They were larger than the original Little People, and looked a bit different. But they had, of course, much sympathy and understanding with them. When the Roman priests left, they took the gods with them, as was the custom of those years. So even if the Roman-Britons didn’t do so before, naturally they now started worshiping the same sweet, kind nature goddesses the Little People worshiped. After all, the native goddesses could so easily be identified with the Roman Diana or Venus. The bonds of family relationships and religion were strong. Together the two races faced the new invasions of the Saxons, Normans, Vikings, and eventually the Catholic Church.

The Saxons were good farmers, stolid, serious people, and they didn’t like the frivolity of the Little People. So they banished them to the heaths, were they lived for generations, and were called the “Heathens.”  Curiously, we still refer to non-Christians by that name. The Little People went about their business, carrying on their night festivals, coloring their nude bodies with green paint made of certain herbs, and generally enjoying life. The Saxons disapproved, in principle, but being human, sometimes mingled anyway. The charm of the Little People was, at times, irresistible. The descendants of the mixed marriages were even larger than those who married Romans, since the Saxons were taller and heavier.

Then Came the Normans, and they liked the Little People very much. The Normans were not strongly Christian, they disliked the Saxons, and they found an affinity with the Heathens. Many of the Heathens took employment with the Norman Lords. For some reason the Little People were always very good with horses. This was a skill the Normans respected, as they were very fond of horses. The mischievous Little People delighted in the enmity between their old adversaries the Saxons, and the Norman lords. They felt appreciated by their new employers, and often invited them to the night festivals they still celebrated. The Normans couldn’t resist. Outnumbered by the boring Saxons, they wanted fun and adventure. There are stories of horses disappearing from stables and of Norman Lords and Ladies riding all night, wearing strange disguises, on their way to attend the festivals. Perhaps this was the beginning of the legends of the Wild Hunts of the Fairies or the Wild Rides of the witches. Many, many mixed marriages took place.

Naturally, despite their mutual dislike, the Normans and the Saxons also started to mix. The descendants of this three-way mix no longer colored their nude bodies in green paint, but some continued to dye their clothes with this color. Wearing green clothes, you could easily camouflage yourself in, say, Sherwood Forest with your Merry Men, and shoot with uncanny accuracy at your enemies. You could have much fun stealing from the rich, and giving to the poor, as good Fairies always did, couldn’t you?  Or you would wear your green clothes at the May Games, which were similar to Witches’ Sabbaths, complete with the Great Maypole, feasts, and mystical initiations.

So here is how the origin of the witches begins to make sense. This is the story as it occurred in England. The same stories, or very similar ones, took place in Finland, Russia, Germany, and many other European countries. If the original Little People really possessed paranormal powers, as so many of their contemporaries claimed, those powers would be diluted by the mixed marriages, but not disappear. They would lie latent, surfacing occasionally in succeeding generations, as all talents do. It’s a long way from the ancient heaths, and those who wished to maintain the traditions of the Old Religion went through much pain and change through the years. So their descendants, friends and followers, who are the witches of today, may possess some psychic powers, or they may not. They follow a tradition as old as human civilization, but one that underwent many upheavals and transformations. They love and serve the Earth, but are still feared by humanity.

This book attempts to disentangle the mysteries and contradictions, without invading the privacy the witches wish to keep. Their history deserves a thorough and sympathetic examination. Like the members of any other group of people, they should be understood and respected for whom they are and what they stand for, without bigotry and prejudice.

Source:

Encyclopedia MYTHICA

 

Protective Magical Ointment

Protective Magical Ointment

Do you feel that you or a loved one is the subject of black magic, a curse or negativity?

Moon Phrase: Full

Supplies:

Mallow Leaves & Stems, Vegetable Shortening, Strainer, Container
Instructions:

– Steep a handful of mallow leaves & stems into a 1/4 cup of vegetable shortening

– Leave it steep overnight

– Strain and place in container

– Rub ointment into skin

– Reapply as needed

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Ethical Spell-Casting

Ethical Spell-Casting

by Skye Alexander

Whether simple or complex, all spells involve focusing the power of intention to produce outcomes. Your intention not only provides the fuel that energizes a spell, it also colors the spell. As discussed in Chapter 1, your motive for doing a spell determines whether it’s “white” or “black” magick, or somewhere in between.

There’s nothing wrong with doing “gray” spells — most spells, in fact, fit into this category. It’s not incorrect or selfish to use your magickal talents to improve your lot in life. However, a wise witch always examines her reasons for casting a spell before she takes any action. Sometimes the only difference between a gray and black spell is your intention. Let’s say, for example, you want a certain job. It’s logical to do a spell to improve your chances of landing the position you desire. But if your spell intentionally causes someone else to lose the job so you can take over, that’s black magick.

Black magick doesn’t always involve the ritual of casting a spell. Many people perform black magick without even realizing it. If, in the heat of the moment, you curse someone or wish something bad to happen to him, you’re doing black magick.

It’s also important to feel good about the spells you do. Witches have different opinions and preferences when it comes to working magick, and although certain practices may not be wrong, they might not be right for you. For instance, some witches engage in sex magick, but it’s not for everyone. Stay within your own comfort zone.

Witches subscribe to a few general guidelines that constitute morally responsible spells. Here are the basic spellcraft “don’ts.”

  • Don’t design a spell that might harm another person or interfere with his free will.
  • Don’t cast a spell that includes components or methods that violate your own personal taboos or ethics.
  • Don’t work with languages or symbolic items that you don’t fully understand.
  • Don’t do spells if you are ill, angry, or otherwise off-center, as this can affect the outcome dramatically.

If you follow these simple guidelines, you’ll avoid the problems, pitfalls, and unpleasant ramifications that can sometimes accompany spell-casting.