A Little Humor for Your Day – “Oreo™ Psycho-Personality Test”

Oreo™ Psycho-Personality Test

 

The Test

Psychologists have discovered that the manner in which people eat Oreo cookies provides great insight into their personalities. Choose which method best describes your favorite method of eating Oreos:

  1. The whole thing all at once.
  2. One bite at a time.
  3. Slow and methodical nibbles examining the results of each bite afterwards.
  4. In little feverous nibbles.
  5. Dunked in some liquid (milk, coffee…).
  6. Twisted apart, the inside, then the cookie.
  7. Twisted apart, the inside, and toss the cookie.
  8. Just the cookie, not the inside.
  9. I just like to lick them, not eat them.
  10. I don’t have a favorite way because I don’t like Oreo.

Your Personality:

  1. The whole thing
    This means you consume life with abandon, you are fun to be with, exciting, carefree with some hint of recklessness. You are totally irresponsible. No one should trust you with their children.
  2. One bite at a time You are lucky to be one of the 5.4 billion other people who eat their Oreo’s this very same way. Just like them, you lack imagination, but that’s ok, not to worry, you’re normal.
  3. Slow and Methodical You follow the rules. You’re very tidy and orderly. You’re very meticulous in every detail with every thing you do to the point of being anal retentive and irritating to others. Stay out of the fast lane if you’re only going to go the speed limit.
  4. Feverous Nibbles Your boss likes you because you get your work done quickly. You always have a million things to do and never enough time to do them. Mental break downs and suicides run in your family. Valium and Ritalin would do you good.
  5. Dunked Every one likes you because you are always up beat. You like to sugar coat unpleasant experiences and rationalize bad situations into good ones. You are in total denial about the shambles you call a life. You have a propensity towards narcotic addiction.
  6. Twisted apart, the inside, and then the cookie You have a highly curious nature. You take pleasure in breaking things apart to find out how they work, though not always able to put them back together, so you destroy all the evidence of your activities. You deny your involvement when things go wrong. You are a compulsive liar and exhibit deviant, if not criminal, behavior.
  7. Twisted apart, the inside, and then toss the cookie You are good at business and take risk that pay off. You take what you want and throw the rest away. You are greedy, selfish, mean, and lack feelings for others. You should be ashamed of yourself. But that’s ok, you don’t care, you got yours.
  8. Just the cookie, not the inside You enjoy pain.
  9. I just like to lick them, not eat them. Stay away from small furry animals and seek professional medical help – immediately.
  10. I don’t have a favorite way, I don’t like Oreo cookies. You probably come from a rich family, and like to wear nice things, and go to up-scale restaurants. You are particular and fussy about the things you buy, own, and wear. Things have to be just right. You like to be pampered. You are a prima donna. There’s just no pleasing you.

 

 

Source

Turok’s Cabana

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Full Venus and Crescent Moon Rise

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2016 April 14

Full Venus and Crescent Moon Rise
Image Credit & Copyright: A. Rosenberg, D. López (El Cielo de Canarias) / IAC

 

Explanation: Inner planet Venus and a thin crescent Moon are never found far from the Sun in planet Earth’s skies. Taken near dawn on April 6, this timelapse composite shows them both rising just before the Sun. The mountaintop Teide Observatory domes on the fortunate island of Tenerife appear in silhouette against the twilight. In fact, the series of telephoto exposures follows the occultation of Venus by the Moon in three frames. Far from Earth in its orbit and in a nearly full phase, Venus was 96 percent illuminated. Near perigee or closest approach to Earth, the Moon’s slender crescent represents about 2 percent of the lunar disk in sunlight. Seen in the first two exposures, the brilliant morning star only vanishes in the third as it winks out behind the bright lunar limb. Five minutes of the dramatic occultation at dawn is compressed into 15 seconds in this timelapse video (vimeo).

Earth Sky News for April 14th: Use moon to locate Crab on April 14

Use moon to locate Crab on April 14

Tonight – April 14, 2016 – the waxing gibbous moon can guide you to the location of the constellation Cancer the Crab on the sky’s dome. Cancer is faint, so you won’t see it well in the moonlight. But, if you note Cancer’s location with respect to other stars, and come back when the moon has moved away, you will glimpse a beautiful star cluster within Cancer.

You’ve probably heard of the constellation Cancer, but there’s a good chance you’ve never seen it. As constellations go, Cancer the Crab is probably the least seen among the most famous constellations. Its primary competitors in the famous-but-not-recognizable category are probably Aries the Ram and Aquarius the Water Bearer.

Why is Cancer so elusive? Simply because it’s faint. Cancer’s brightest star is magnitude 3.5, meaning that none of these stars is visible from light-polluted cities or suburbs.

That’s why tonight might be your night. The slightly waxing gibbous moon shines right in front of this famous constellation this evening, so when you gaze in the moon’s direction you are gazing toward Cancer.

Alas, the moon is very bright, and Cancer is faint. Even if you have a clear sky, the bright light of the moon will wash out this constellation’s stars from view.

But before you give up on your quest to see Cancer, consider this. In 2016, the moon is not far from Cancer the Crab. Take a look at the chart above. Note that you can use the dazzling planet Jupiter and the bright star Regulus to star-hop to the faint constellation Cancer the Crab.

By the end of April 2016, the moon will have dropped out of the early evening sky, and you’ll be able to identify Cancer. Use bright Jupiter and Regulus to find it. Then note that Cancer glimmers between Regulus and the two bright Gemini stars, Castor and Pollux.

The planet Jupiter will move away eventually, but remember those stars! They’ll always be near Cancer.

And, if you see Cancer on a moonless night, you’ll have a wonderful surprise in store, especially if you’re looking in a dark sky away from city lights:

In a dark sky, if your eyesight is good, you can make out a patch of haze in the midst of Cancer’s stars. If you have binoculars, you’ll more clearly see a cluster of stars within Cancer, called Praesepe – also known as the open star cluster Messier 44 – most frequently called the Beehive.

Cancer is well known not because it’s bright, but because the sun in its yearly journey passes directly in front of it from about July 20 to August 9.

So by definition, faint as it is, Cancer is a constellation of the Zodiac.

Bottom line: Use the moon to locate the constellation Cancer on April 14, 2016. Cancer is faint so you won’t see it well until the moon moves away. But, in 2016, the planet Jupiter is nearby and can help you find this faint constellation, after the moon has gone.

 

Author

Deborah Byrd