Let’s Talk Witch – Adapting A Spell for Your Own Needs

Adapting A Spell for Your Own Needs

 

Today you will find many books on spellcraft that contain instructions for casting spells. You can also purchase ready-made kits that include all the ingredients necessary for a spell. Nonetheless, if those instructions or ingredients don’t make sense to you or break your personal ethics, the spell will not work.

The best spells are those you create yourself or adapt to suit your own purpose. The process of collecting ingredients, preparing them, and designing the steps of your spell focuses your mind on your intention and adds energy to the spell. Sometimes you must adapt a tried and true spell because you can’t get the designated components. For example, if you lived in New England and used ash leaves or bark in protection spells but then moved to Texas, you would not be able to find such plant life; you could then compensate by substituting another ingredient, such as basil.

With the pervious example in mind, it’s easy to see that there will be many times when a Witch or Wiccan will want to adapt a spell or devise oone of her own. How do you begin the process? Adapting a spell is far easier than creating one, so let’s start there. When a Witch examines a spell, she looks for continuity and comprehensiveness.
Do the spell target your goal through its words, actions and components?

Does it do so on a multisensual level (involving your hearing, sight, touch, taste, and smell)?

Does every part of the spell make sense and excite your higher sentiments?

If the answer to any of these questions is no, try to find a substitute. To illustrate, many old love spells call for blood as components. But modern awareness of disease (or squeamishness) might make blood inappropriate. Instead a witch could use red wine. The red juice from crushed raspberries, strawberries, or passion fruit (fruit associated with love) would also work well. In this manner, she can still follow the basic spell while replying on components that are safe and support her ethics.

Choosing your own ingredients when adapt a spell, rather than following a prescribed formulas allows you to fine-tune a spell to your specific needs. Once you understand the basic natures and symbolism of various components, you can mix and match them to create exactly the right combination of energies.

 
Source:
The Everything Wicca & Witchcraft Book
Author Skye Alexander

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witchWOTC Extra – Charging and Empowering Components

witchCHARGING AND EMPOWERING COMPONENTS

There are a few basic steps you can take in order to ensure quality, and to fine-tune how you handle the energy of your components. Whatever ingredients or components you use in a spell, make sure to cleanse or clear them of any previous influence or energy hanging around, then empower them with your desire or purpose. It is called empowering or charging. If you don’t do this, you’re not energizing the components to act in accordance with your spell; it’s like a badly plugged-in electrical cord. You’re not being energy-efficient, and your spell won’t be using the power as well as it could.

There are several different methods to empower or activate the energy of your ingredients. Words used in spellbooks include enchant, empower, program, bless, charge, and consecrate. Different practitioners have different techniques to empower components, but it can be quite simple. Here are two methods by which you can charge spell ingredients.

Charging Technique #1
Hold the ingredient in your hand, or hold your hands over the ingredient. Close your eyes and take three deep breaths, releasing tension or stress with each exhalation. Reach deep inside yourself to the core of your heart and feel your need or desire. Allow your emotion concerning this desire to flow up from your heart and down your arms to your hands, and from there into the ingredient. Continue until you feel that the energy of the ingredient resonates with your desire.

Charging Technique #2
This technique clears any previous energy hanging around your components which might interfere with your new purpose. Hold your hands over your ingredients. Take three deep breaths, releasing tension and stress with each exhalation. Say:

I ask the great love of the cosmos,
The light of the universe,
To cleanse and charge these components
That they may be prepared and consecrated
To ensure my success.
Bless these ingredients, and bless my goal.
These are my words, this is my will.

By empowering your components, you are programming them to act in accord with your intent and goal.

When you charge an ingredient, use only as much as you need in the spell. If the component is an herb, this is likely to be a pinch or a spoonful, no more. Empowering your entire jar of mint for prosperity means that you can’t use it for healing later on. In other words, it’s a waste. Take only as much out as you intend to use, and keep the rest in an airtight jar. The only components you can really cleanse and reuse are objects such as stones, statues, boxes, and so forth, and even then it depends on your chosen method of spell disposal once your goal has been met. Sometimes it’s more appropriate to bury the object, or burn it, or some similar action.

Power Spellcraft For Life: The Art Of Crafting And Casting For Positive Change
Arin Murphy-Hiscock

Magickal Goody for May 4th – Five Finger Protection Bath

Magickal Goody for the Day

witch potion 001
Five Finger Protection Bath

The following ingredients will be required.
* Five dried or fresh bay laurel leaves
*One cup (or more) of sea salt
*Five limes, sliced in half
* A splash of vinegar, preferably lemon vinegar
* A glass of spring water
*A glass of rose water or rose hydrosol, or one of the charged waters

1. Draw a warm bath

2. First add the salt and bay leaves.

3. Squeeze the limes into the water, tossing the fruit as well.

4. Add the other ingredients.

5. Enter the water submerge yourself completely five times if possible. Stay in as long as you like. Rub your body with the limes.

6. Drain the water while still in the tube. Allow yourself to air-dry amidst remnants of the limes and leftover leaves.

 

Source:
Jane’s Pocketbook of Spell: Cleansing, Banishing, Protection and other various Remedies
Alicia (juju j.a.n.e.), Hill

Spells, herbs and Aromatherapy to Help with Fevers and Colds

Keep away Fevers {Folk Magic} # 4 

Ingredients: Honeysuckle

Another way of keeping fevers at bay, is to grow Honeysuckle above your front door, and/ or around the windows around your house.

Protection from Colds {Aromatherapy & Folk Magic} # 5

Ingredients: Eucalyptus Leaves

Another method of preventing colds from infecting you is to place eucalyptus leaves under your pillow before going to sleep. These can be fresh or dried leaves.

Flowers, Dawn (2012-03-24). The Spell Book of Wiccan Shadows (Kindle Locations 902-906). Under the Moon. Kindle Edition.

Home Purification Spell

HOME PURIFICATION SPELL

To make these incense you will need:

1 tablespoon pine needles
1 tablespoon juniper
1 tablespoon cedar

Make sure all ingredients are completely dry. Grind ingredients together and burn on charcoal. While the incense are burning chant the following:

Spirits of the corners,
Winds of the quarters,
You who stand watching,
And you who hear my voice,
Guard well my home tonight

Let’s Talk Witch – Making Magick Potions

Let’s Talk Witch – Making Magick Potions

The art of making potions goes back to the earliest civilizations and in terms of history, as one of the oldest crafts known to humankind. Brewing beer, making wine, and infusing potions are traditions that have been perfected through time. Many of the techniques making a great beer, wine or potion are the same. The mixture is often called a wort. The wort is then put through a process, which in the case of potions, gives it magickal properties.

The different ways of making potions stem from ancient medicinal and alchemical recipes, formulas that you can put together from basic ingredients in the privacy of your own kitchen. Historically magick love potions also called

philters, were often made of unappealing ingredients. You had to be extremely thristy or unaware of the contents to sip one. Today, this isn’t the case as most potion ingredients are tasty and appealing.

Potion brews can be anything from an herb tea to a fruit smoothie. One of the main things to remember when making any potion is to make it taste good if a person is going to drink it. If you are using a potion primarily for its scent, for example in a powder form, then make sure it smells good. Try to avoid unfortunate situations like the infamous wizard Aleister Crowley found himself in when he developed a perfume potion for sex magick called “It.” Great idea Aleister, but nothing came of “It,” because the stuff reputedly had a horrid smell!

Before you make your potion, be sure that you have all the ingredients and tools you will need at your fingertips. Following is a list of potion-making tools you will need:

*A ceramic, earthenware, glass, or wood bowl

*A pot, preferably one that is NOT made of metal, for brewing the potion

*A wooden spoon for stirring the potion

*Cheesecloth for straining the potion

*A mortar and pestle for grinding potion ingredients

*A container for the potion

Clean, preferably sterilize, all of your tools, especially the potion container. You can clean containers by carefully pouring boiling water into them, or you can put the container in the dishwasher, running it through the entire cycle and turning on the heat/dry cycle. This also does a good job of sterilizing contatiners. If you don’t have time to properly clean the chalice, cup, glass or other containers the potion is going in, then just make sure that it is as clean as possible. Any residue may taint the potion.

The kind of water you use is important when preparing a magick potion. Spring, well, rain, and distilled waters are better than tap water, which often contains chemicals such as chlorine and fluoride. Well water with no harmful contaminants can be used; rain water can be used as long as there aren’t any pollutants in it; and distilled water can be used for potions, but it is inert. Unless the recipe calls for it, I seldom use sea water or mineral water due to their mineral content.

Witches and wizards make potions by mixing one, two, a few or many ingredients together into one. Sometimes the ingredients are used just as they are. Other times they are ground up, shredded, pureed or crushed with your fingers or with the mortar and pestle. The herbs that go into your potion can be either fresh or dried. If you use fresh herbs, it take three times more of them than dried herbs. For example, if a potion recipe calls for one teaspoon of dried sage leaves and you want to use fresh sage, it would take three teaspoons of fresh sage to make the potion.

Processes call infusions and decoctions are also employed. An infusion, the most common method of internal herbal preparation, is usually in the form of a tea. It can also take the form of magick water. The infusion method works best when the potion you are making requires soft plant parts, such as leaves, flowers or green steams.

When using the infusion method of preparing potions, there are a couple of things you can do to make your potion more effective. One thing is to brew aromatic ingredients such as garlic and clove, in a pot with a lid that fits

on tight. The reason for this is to keep from losing the natural oils of the aromatic ingredients to evaporation. These natural oils are important for the effectiveness of the potion.

Some ingredients are sensitive to heat, so you can make a cold infusion by soaking the herbs in water for anywhere from 6 to 12 hours. A sealed earthenware pot is best for cold infusions. When preparing potions using the infusion method, only make enough for immediate use as infusions rapidly lose their potency.

The method for making a decoction potion is similar to the infusion. You begin by grinding your ingredients into a powder that you can then make your potions. Ingredients that are hard, such as bark and stems, require more heat to release their magickal properties. The use of more heat to release the natural oils of an ingredient is primary difference between the infusion and decoction methods of potion making.

The decoction method would be the one most associated with the traditional use of magick cauldrons. In this way, dried herbal ingredients are ground into powder and are cut into small piedes, and then added to the potion. The potion is made in a pot, and the ingredients are simmered and boiled in order to release their magickal properties. Again in the case of aromatic ingredients, you should use a lid on the pot to slow the evaporation process. The amount of time that you heat the mixture depends on the potion recipe. Usually decoction are strained to eliminate the hard bark and stems before using them.

At times, potions use both methods in their recipe. In this case prepare the two separately as a decoction and infusion, and then mix the ingredients together after the decoction has cooled. By doing so, the infusion ingredients are not ruined by the heat that the decoction process requires. Always stir clockwise.

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