Daily Feng Shui News for March 2 – ‘Fame’

Many of us will be tuned into the 86th Annual Academy Awards tonight, an event that showcases the achievements of the film industry’s best and brightest. If you would like to be thought of as a star within your own industry, then Feng Shui says that you should light up your ‘Fame’ area. This arena is located at the back center or back middle of your living space. One way to fire up the ‘Fame’ energies is to place nine small red candles in that space and light them whenever you want to heat up your recognition factor. When this works for you and you receive an award, the first thing I want to hear you say is, ‘I’d like to thank Ellen –.’

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

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The Witches Almanac for Friday, January 31st

Witchy Cat Graphics & Comments
The Witches Almanac for Friday, January 31st

Friday (Venus): Love, friendship, reconciliation and beauty.

Chinese New Year (Horse)

Waxing Moon

The Waxing Moon is the ideal time for magick to draw things toward you.

Moon Phase: First Quarter

Moon Sign: Aquarius

Aquarius: Rebellious energy. Time to break habits and make abrupt changes. Personal freedom and individuality is the focus.

Moon enters Pisces 10:45 pm

Pisces: The focus is on dreaming, nostalgia, intuition and psychic impressions. A good time for spiritual or philanthropic activities.

Incense: Vanilla

Color: Rose

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OIMELC – February 2

OIMELC – February 2

Down with Rosemary and so
Down with baies and mistletoe;
Down with Holly, live and all
Wherewith ys drest the Yuletide Hall;
That so the superstitious find No one least Branch there left behind;
For look, how many leaves there be
Neglected there, maids, trust to me,
So many goblins you shall see.
–Robert Herrick

Oimelc – Imbolc in the Saxon – marks the first stirring of life in the earth.
The Yule season originally ended at Oimelc. But with increasing organization and industrialization, increasing demands for labor and production, the holiday kept shrinking, first to the two weeks ending at Twelfth Night, then to a single week ending at New Year’s, then to a single day.

Oimelc begins a season of purification similar to that preceding Yule. It ends
at Ostara. No marriages, initiations or puberty rites should be celebrated
between Oimelc and Ostara.

The candles and torches at Oimelc signify the divine life-force awakening
dormant life to new growth.

THEMES

Growth of roots begin again. Bare branches begin to swell with leaf buds, and
growth appears at the tips of evergreen branches. The tools of agriculture are
being make ready for Spring.

Xian feasts of St. Brigid, and Celtic feast of Brigit, the maiden aspect of the
triple goddess and mother of Dagda. Her symbol is the white swan. A Roman feast of Bacchus and Ceres. The Lupercalia, a feast of Pan. The Nephelim or Titans, those offspring of human-divine unions said to have ruled Atlantis.

Grannus, a mysterious Celtic god whom the Romans identified with Apollo.

PURPOSE OF THE RITES

To awaken life in the Earth. Fire tires to strengthen the young Sun, to bring
the fertilizing, purifying, protective and vitalizing influence of fire to the
fields, orchards, domestic animals, and people. To drive away winter. To charm
candles for household use throughout the year.

FOLK CUSTOMS

The three functions of Oimelc – end of Yule, feast of candles or torches, and
beginning of a purificatory season – are divided by the Xian calendar among
Twelfth Night, Candlemas and Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras, Carnival). The customs of all three feasts are derived from Oimelc, with at most a thin Xian gloss.

Parades of giant figures (Titans?) in rural towns in France and at Mardi Gras
and Carnival celebrations. A figure representing the Spirit of Winter or Death,
sometime made of straw, sometimes resembling a snowman, is drowned, burnt or in once case, stuffed with fireworks and exploded. They symbol of Montreal’s Winter Carnival is the giant figure of Bonhomme di Neige (snowman).

Groundhog Day, Chinese New Year and St. Valentine’s Day customs.

The French provinces are so rich in Oimelc customs they cannot be listed here.
Refer to “The Golden Bough”.

Wassailing the trees: at midnight, carolers carry a bucket of ale, cider or
lamb’s wool in a torchlight procession through the orchards. The leader dips a
piece of toast in the drink and sedges it in the fork of each tree, with the
traditional cheer (variations exist) of: “Hats full, holes full, barrels full,
and the little heap under the stairs!”.

Who finds the bean in the Twelfth Night cake becomes king of the feast; who
finds the pea becomes queen – never mind the gender of the finders. Rag-bag
finery and gilt-paper crowns identify the king and queen. The rulers give
ridiculous orders to the guests, who must obey their every command. They are
waited on obsequiously, and everything they do is remarked and announced
admiringly and importantly: “The King drinks!”, “The Queen sneezes!” and
everyone politely imitates the ruler’s example.

SYMBOLIC DECORATIONS

Snowdrops are picked for vases, but otherwise no special decorative effects are
indicated. Go carnival, balloons and confetti.

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

Parades, with showers of confetti, gala balls, masks, street dancing, mumming,
winter sports, ice and snow sculpture.

THE RITE

Dress in dark colors with much silver jewelry. Outdoors, after dark on the Even,
have the site arranged with a fire in the cauldron and the altar draped in
white, at the Northeast. The fire may be composed all or in part of Yule greens.

Go in a torchlight procession to the Circle. Include a stamping dance, possibly beating the ground with sticks, before the Invocation. The invocation may end with the calling of Hertha, a Teutonic goddess of the earth and the hearth. Call her name three times and at each call beat on the ground three times with the palms of both hands.

A figure representing Winter should be burned in the fire. Communion may consist of Sabbat Cakes or a Twelfth Night cake (there are many traditional recipes) and cider or wassail. A procession may leave the Circle for a time to wassail a nearby orchard. Couples may leap the bonfire. Supplies of candles brought by the coveners are blessed.

Boys puberty rites may be celebrated. These usually include mock plowing by the boys.

Close the Circle and go indoors for the feast.

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2014 Chinese Horoscopes

2014 Chinese Horoscopes

Take action and demand more in the Year of the Wood Horse

Stephanie Dempsey   Stephanie Dempsey on the topics of horoscopes, chinese, astrology, 2014

January 31, 2014, begins the Chinese Year of the Wood Horse. Horse years place great emphasis on hard work and tenacity. 2014 could present fantastic opportunities for business, travel and adventure, but these things will require decisive action.

In general, “you snooze, you lose” could be the action-oriented Horse’s motto. Furthermore, dishonesty and injustice may backfire spectacularly this Chinese New Year. The forthright Horse does not reward those who achieve their goals through underhanded methods.

The Wood element is ambitious, assertive and heroic. By aiming high this Chinese New Year, you can achieve much more than you ever dreamed. Settling for second best and sitting on the sidelines may result in terrible disappointment.

In a Wood year, you’ll fare better by working to improve your life, rather than trying to maintain the status quo. Apply for jobs that pay more, afford greater satisfaction and offer more leisure time. Demand more from your romantic partner, and don’t tolerate shoddy behavior.

Horse years are wonderful times to expand horizons, explore unfamiliar territory and get plenty of mental stimulation. If you’ve been thinking about taking or teaching a class, this would be a wonderful time to do so. Learning a foreign language and mastering a musical instrument are also favored activities in 2014. Beware of biting off more than you can chew, however, because Horse years can prompt people to overestimate their abilities. 

Money in the Year of the Wood Horse

Wood years favor businesses that encourage education, exploration and hip trends. Day cares, schools and universities should fare well in 2014. Publishing houses and media enterprises could also turn handsome profits. Ventures related to travel may experience an uptick in business. Airlines, car rental firms and train lines could do very well in the Year of the Wood Horse, as well as travel agencies. After a prolonged slump, fashion lines may see a dramatic improvement.

Institutions that require thoughtful planning and patience, such as banking, accounting, architecture firms, government agencies and technical research, could have difficulty in this spontaneous Horse Year.

If you want to increase your chances of getting a good job during a Wood Horse year, adopt an optimistic outlook. Those who are decisive, imaginative, compassionate and idealistic will fare very well in 2014. Learning to turn anger into kindness can attract better job offers. A positive attitude is more important than impressive skill sets during The Year of the Horse.

Love in the Year of the Wood Horse

The Wood Horse Year favors romance and adventure. Committed relationships that are showing signs of strain need careful attention. Impromptu outings, exciting vacations and spontaneous gifts can keep love alive throughout 2014.

Dull routines and predictable behavior could be the kiss of death for couples who refuse to mix things up! If you have children, hire a sitter so you can spend more quality time with your partner.

If you’re single, you could enjoy the dating scene this year. Playing the field could be really stimulating. Instead of going after a certain type, try dating as many different people as possible. This will help you narrow your choice for a life partner.

Ultimately, you may decide you’re having so much fun that you won’t settle down. Wood Years can make people a bit restless. In the event you do fall in love, it could be with someone who is introspective, imaginative and cautious. Neat freaks and critics could get on your nerves.  

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January 1 – Daily Feast

January 1 – Daily Feast

If, like a Cherokee warrior, I can look at the new year as an opportunity to stand on new ground, then strength and courage are on my side. If I have waited a long time for everything to be perfect – and there have been moments, brief as they were, that filled my expectations – then I can face the challenges. I will remember that things do work out, bodies do heal, relationships mend – not because I said it, but because I believe it. But it is time to make things right, to stay on the path. As water runs fresh and free from the woodland spring, so new life and meaning will bubble up from my own inner source. I will be still and steady, because there is nothing to be gained by showing fear in a chaotic world. I can turn from ignorance and prejudice toward a light that never goes out.

~ The death of fear is in doing what you fear to do. ~

SEQUICHIE COMINGDEER

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Daily Feng Shui News for Jan. 1st – ‘New Year’s Eats’

Happy New Year! I wish you the most magical and wonderful 2014 you can ever hope to have. Towards that same end, you may want to follow an ages-old tradition that promises to put that wish in action. Legend says that on this day a grand feast should be eaten that includes salmon (for long life and wisdom), cabbage (for fortune and riches), and mandarin oranges (for good health and even better luck). Nutritional experts agree that eating fish is good for the brain, cabbage for the liver and oranges are filled with vitamin C to help support your healthy immune system. Bon appetit. Bon New Year!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

WOW! It’s A New Year. May You Be Blessed With Love, Comfort & Prosperity In The New Year!

In the New Year,
we wish you the best year you’ve ever had,
and that each New Year
will be better than the last.
May you realize your fondest dreams
and take time to recognize and enjoy
each and every blessing.

Happy New Year,
And many more!

Source:
 “In the New Year”
By Joanna Fuchs
Poemsource.com
 

Daily Feng Shui News for Dec. 31 – ‘New Year’s Eve Traditions’

Happy New Year’s Eve! If you want to attract more money in the coming year, then clean out your wallet of all old receipts and fill it with twenty-seven one dollar bills and forty-nine coins. Don’t forget to open your front door at midnight and throw both money and orange peels into the entryway. Leave them there until January second. The word ‘orange’ in Mandarin Chinese sounds exactly like the word for ‘gold,’ something it’s believed to attract. Opening all of the doors and the windows at midnight will also allow old or stuck energies to depart while inviting healthy, fresh and abundant ones to come and stay for the whole of your next fortune-filled New Year.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

Let’s Take A Look At the Many Winter Customs Around The World

Winter Customs Around the World

By Patti Wigington, About.com

Winter Around the World:

Whether you observe Yule, Christmas, Sol Invictus, or Hogmanay, the winter season is typically a time of celebration around the world. Traditions vary widely from one country to the next, but one thing they all have in common is the observance of customs around the time of the winter solstice. Here are some ways that residents of different countries observe the season.

Australia:

Althought Australia is huge geographically, the population sits at under 20 million people. Many of them come from a blend of cultures and ethnic backgrounds, and celebration in December is often a mix of many different elements. Because Australia is in the southern hemisphere, December is part of the warm season. Residents still hhave Christmas trees, Father Christmas, Christmas Carols and gifts which are a familiar Christmas and gifts, as well as being visited by Father Christmas. Because it coincides with school holidays, it’s not uncommon for Australians to celebrate the season on vacation away from home.

China:

In China, only about two percent of the population observes Christmas as a religious holiday, although it is gaining in popularity as a commercial event. However, the main winter festival in China is New Year celebration that occurs at the end of January. Recently, it’s become known as the Spring Festival, and is a time of gift-giving and feasting. A key aspect of the Chinese New Year is , and painings and portraits are brought out and honored in the family’s home.

Denmark:

In Denmark, Christmas Eve dinner is a big cause for celebration. The most anticipated part of the meal is the traditional rice pudding, baked with a single almond inside. Whichever guest gets the almond in his pudding is guaranteed good luck for the coming year. Children leave out glasses of milk for the Juulnisse, which are elves that live in peoples’ homes, and for Julemanden, the Danish version of Santa Claus.

Finland:

The Finns have a tradition of resting and relaxing on Christmas Day. The night before, on Christmas Eve, is really the time of the big feast — and leftovers are consumed the next day. On December 26, the day of St. Stephen the Martyr, everyone goes out and visits friends and relatives, weather permitting. One fun custom is that of Glogg parties, which involve the drinking of Glogg, a mulled wine made from Madeira, and the eating of lots of baked treats.

Greece:

Christmas was typically not a huge holiday in Greece, as it is in North America. However, the recognition of St. Nicholas has always been important, because he was the patron saint of sailors, among other things. Hearth fires burn for several days between December 25 and January 6, and a sprig of basil is wrapped around a wooden cross to protect the home from the Killantzaroi, which are negative spirits that only appear during the twelve days after Christmas. Gifts are exchanged on January 1, which is St. Basil’s day.

India:

India’s Hindu population typically observes this time of year by placing clay oil lamps on the roof in honor of the return of the sun. The country’s Christians celebrate by decorating mango and banana trees, and adorning homes with red flowers, such as the poinsettia. Gifts are exchanged with family and friends, and baksheesh, or , is given to the poor and needy.

Italy:

In Italy, there is the legend of La Befana, a kind old witch who travels the earth giving gifts to children. It is said that the three Magi stopped on their way to Bethlehem and asked her for shelter for a night. She rejected them, but later realized she’d been quite rude. However, when she went to call them back, they had gone. Now she travels the world, searching, and delivering gifts to all the children.

Romania:

In Romania, people still observe an old fertility ritual which probably pre-dates Christianity. A woman bakes a confection called a turta, made of pastry dough and filled with melted sugar and honey. Before baking the cake, as the wife is kneading the dough, she follows her husband outdoors. The man goes from one barren tree to another, threatening to cut each down. Each time, the wife begs him to spare the tree, saying, “Oh no, I am sure this tree will be as heavy with fruit next spring as my fingers are with dough today.” The man relents, the wife bakes the turta, and the trees are spared for another year.

Scotland:

In Scotland, the big holiday is that of . On Hogmanay, which is observed on December 31, festivities typically spill over into the first couple of days of January. There’s a tradition known as “first-footing”, in which the first person to cross a home’s threshold brings the residents good luck for the coming year — as long as the guest is dark-haired and male. The tradition stems from back when a red- or blonde-haired stranger was probably an invading Norseman.

A Very Blessed & Happy Wednesday To You, from Friends & Family!

Samhain Comments & Graphics

Lady of the Harvest, now is the time
to feast and frolic, for we meet
on the edge of Winter’s shadow.
All the seed that was sown in
Springtime past has long
been reaped;
the fields stand barren, empty
and the spirit shall soon turn inward.
The world’s fabric grows thin and
souls of the dead pass by on their
way to the Summerland.
Bless their passing, for though to some it
seems an ending,
this exodus of spirit foreshadows new beginnings.
Thus do we celebrate the dawn of the New Year.
Blessed Be.