Sunday – The day of the Sun Gods

 

Sunday–The Day of the Sun

Among all peoples in early times the sun was an object of wonder. It was to them a mystery, but although they could never understand it, they imagined many explanations of it. When we remember that in those long-ago days nothing was known of the rotation of the earth or of its movement round the sun, we can readily see how very real the movement of the sun must have seemed. But if it moved across the sky it must be a chariot, for it was in chariots that all men travelled quickly, while none but a god could ride across the sky.

The nature of the sun may have been difficult to understand, but the comforts and the benefits which it brought to men were plain to all. It was a kindly god who gave the earth warmth and light, who ripened the crops and the fruit and made them serviceable to man, who clothed the trees with leaves and scattered the fields with flowers. It is little wonder then that in all parts of the world men worshiped the sun, and the god whom they pictured in their imagination was all the more real to them because of the great worh he performed.

We have seen how the Greeks and Romans worshiped the sun as Apollo, the god who set out each day when the Gates of the East had been opened by the Goddess of the Dawn, and, driving his chariot across the sky, dipped down into the oeean, where a boat awaited him to bring him back. Apollo was the most beautiful of the gods, as befitted the giver of light and happiness, and was worshiped throughout those sunny lands of the South. On the Island of Rhodes, off the coast of Asia Minor, stood one of the Seven Wonders of the World, a statue of Apollo. It was known as the Colossus of Rhodes on account of its size, for it was 100 feet high, the fingers of the god being as long as a man. It was placed at the entrance to a harbour, and remained in position for nearly sixty years, and was then (224 B.C.) overthrown by an earthquake.

The principal temples of Apollo were in the Island of Delos, and at Delphi in Greece, and it was at this town of Delphi that the great Pythian Games were held every four years in honour of the god. The games were so called because Apollo was believed to have slain at Delphi a dragon called Python.

The sun’s daily journey, his contest with the darkness, and his final victory at the dawn of the new day are ideas which have led to endless stories, and we find these stories are very similar among different peoples. Ra, the great sun-god of Egypt, was pictured as travelling by day in a ship across the waters of the sky, and returning during the night through the kingdom of the dead. To the Egyptians Ra was a symbol of life, death, and a new birth or resurrection. Through the night Ra fought with the lord of the powers of darkness, a huge serpent, who awaited the sun in the west with a band of demons, and whom he overcame at the approach of dawn. Ra was always represented either as a hawk or as a man with a hawk’s head, with the sun on his head. The hawk was chosen as his symbol, because it was said to fly towards the sun.

In India the sun was worshiped as the god Agni, who rode in a shining chariot drawn by blood-red horses. He was golden-haired, and had a double face, seven tongues, and seven arms.

Among the gods of the early British who were driven into Ireland was the sun-god Nudd, or Ludd, as he was sometimes called. His name appears in Ludgate, and it is thought that his temple stood on what is now Ludgate Hill in London. At a town called Lydney, in Gloucestershire, the remains of a temple to Ludd have been found, with many inscriptions containing his name.

The Angles and Saxons imagined the sun to be carried in a chariot driven by a maiden named Sol, as we shall read later. They had no god whom we can describe exactly as a sun-god, but several of their gods were like the sun in many ways, particularly Frey, whose sword sent out rays of light like the sun, and who caused the crops to ripen, and Balder the Beautiful, the God of Light, who was the favourite son of Odin, father of the gods, and was, as his name shows, the most handsome of the gods, ever happy and light-hearted. His golden hair and his bright, clear eyes shone like the sun, and his radiant smile warmed the hearts of all who met him. He knew no thought of evil, but was “good and pure, and bright, was loved by all, as all love light”.

In spite of his lovable nature, however, Balder was destined to misfortune through his twin brother, Hodur, the God of Darkness, who was the exact opposite of his brother, for he was gloomy and silent, and suffered from blindness. Odin, through his great wisdom, knew that disaster was to come to Balder, and spared no effort to stave off the evil day, by making all things in creation swear that they would never harm the God of Light. This they were only too ready to do, and all made a solemn vow, with the one exception of a shoot of mistletoe, which was passed over as being too slight a thing ever to cause harm to anyone. Balder being now free from all possibility of hurt, the gods one day amused themselves by shooting and throwing at him, laughing gaily as the objects they threw fell short or turned aside. Now Loki, the God of Fire, was bitterly jealous of the God of Light, and, as he watched the sport, his evil nature prompted him to a cruel and cowardly deed. Having discovered that the mistletoe alone of all created things had made no promise, Loki hastened to the gate of Valhalla, where the mistletoe was growing and plucking it, by the help of his magical power quickly fashioned from it an arrow. He then returned and sought out Hodur, who, because of his blindness, was standing idly aside and taking no part in the sport. Loki pretended to take pity on him, and fitting the arrow to a bow which he placed in Hodur’s hands, he offered to aim the shaft for the blind god. Aided by Loki, Hodur let fly the fatal arrow, and, to the horror and amazement of the gods, Balder fell dead. The anger of the gods against Hodur knew no bounds, and they would have killed him had it not been for their own law, which forbade the shedding of blood in Asgard, the home of the gods. All Asgard was plunged in the deepest grief, and Hermod, the messenger of the gods, was sent to Hel, the Goddess of the Underworld, praying her to restore Balder to life. Hel consented to do so, on condition that all created things should weep for Balder. Messengers were at once sent out over all the world to bid all things weep for Balder. Living creatures, trees, and flowers, and even the stones shed tears for the god they had loved so well; but at last a giantess was found whose only reply to the messengers was “Let Hel keep what she has”. Thus the evil Loki, for he it was in the disguise of a giantess, showed once again his cruel hatred of Balder, and caused the whole earth to mourn the loss of the radiant God of Light.

The gods now prepared for the burial of Balder. As was the custom among the Northmen, fuel was piled on the deck of Balder’s ship Ringhorn, and the body was then laid on the funeral pyre. The sides of the ship were decorated with rich cloth and garlands of flowers, and swords, armour, drinking-vessels, and many other things which the gods valued, were placed beside the hero. A torch was then put to the fuel, and the ship was launched. The funeral pyre floated slowly towards the west, the rising flames lighting up sea and sky, until at last, like the sun itself, it sank slowly into the sea, and all light faded from the sky

Wednesday

-Season of the witch-

Wednesday

Ruler: Wodin, Mercury

Colors: Orange, light blue, and gray

Power Hours: Sunrise and the 8th, 16th, and 24th hours following

Keywords: Success, creativity, communication

The word Wednesday is reminiscent of the Norse wind god Wodin, which is referenced in the popular rhyme verse “Wednesday’s child is full of woe.” This does not mean that those born on this day are full of sorrow or trouble. To be full of Woden (Wodin) means to be full of wind, to be spirited. Woden was such a powerful pagan god that the German church fathers changed the name of his day to Mittwoch, meaning midweek, in an attempt to exorcise his influence.

In the Spanish word for Wednesday, miercoles, we clearly see its connection to Mercury. Under the guidance of Mercury; Wednesday is a day of swift activity, communication, correspondence, and phone calls. This is a good day for journalists, writers, poets, bargaining, hiring employees, and visiting friends.

On Wednesdays, the hour of sunrise and every eight hours after that are also ruled by Mercury, making these times of the day doubly blessed. These are the strongest four hours for ritual work. Check your local newspaper, astrological calendar, or almanac to determine when sunrise occurs.
 

Source

Gypsy Magic

Wednesday

¸.•*´¨`*•Goddess of the Night Sea ○ Shimmer¸.•*´¨`*•
Wednesday

Odin and Wodan’s day

Wednesday is the day third of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but some countries counts it as the fourth day of the week.

Odin – the Norse god
Wednesday between Tuesday and Thursday and is named after Germanic god Wodan and Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

Naming Wednesday
The English, the word Wednesday is derived from Old English and literally means “Wodan’s day”. The Germanic god Wodan is also known as Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

In most languages with Latin origins, the day is named after the god and planet Mercury.

Middle English – wodnesday or wednesday or wednesdai

Old English – wōdnesdæg – Woden’s day

Latin – dies Mercurii – “Day of Mercury”

Ancient Greek – hemera Hermu – “day of Hermes”

Third day of the Week
Wednesday is the third day of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but in the US, Canada, and Japan it’s counted as the fourth day if the week. It is in the middle of the common 5-day work week that starts on Monday and ends on Friday. It is also the middle day in the seven day week that starts on Sunday and ends on Saturday.

“Hump day”
Wednesday is sometimes referred to as “hump day” in American English slang meaning that one has made it “over the hump” of the work week.
 

Source

timeanddate.com

Wednesday – Odin and Wodan’s day

WiNtER ChAlLeNgE
Wednesday – Odin and Wodan’s day

Wednesday is the day third of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but some countries counts it as the fourth day of the week.

Odin – the Norse god
Wednesday between Tuesday and Thursday and is named after Germanic god Wodan and Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

Naming Wednesday
The English, the word Wednesday is derived from Old English and literally means “Wodan’s day”. The Germanic god Wodan is also known as Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

In most languages with Latin origins, the day is named after the god and planet Mercury.

Middle English – wodnesday or wednesday or wednesdai

Old English – wōdnesdæg – Woden’s day

Latin – dies Mercurii – “Day of Mercury”

Ancient Greek – hemera Hermu – “day of Hermes”

Third day of the Week
Wednesday is the third day of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but in the US, Canada, and Japan it’s counted as the fourth day if the week. It is in the middle of the common 5-day work week that starts on Monday and ends on Friday. It is also the middle day in the seven day week that starts on Sunday and ends on Saturday.

“Hump day”
Wednesday is sometimes referred to as “hump day” in American English slang meaning that one has made it “over the hump” of the work week.
Source:

timeanddate.com

Home & Hearth Magick for Sunday, January 24

A White Wolf Winter
Home & Hearth Magick for Sunday, January 24

On Sunday, work for success, healing and blessings.

Planetary Influence: The Sun

Household Symbols: A rooster, a sun, gold jewelry

Colors: Yellow and gold

Kitchen Spices: Cinnamon and orange peels

Source:
Cottage Witchery, Natural Magick for Hearth and Home
Author: Ellen Dugan

The Witches Almanac for Sunday, January 24th

Vintage, winter, forest with wolves // Winter Collection Blingee
The Witches Almanac for Sunday, January 24th

Sunday(Sun): Healing, spirituality, success, strength and protection.

Alasitas Fair (Bolivian)

Waning Moon
The Waning Moon (from the Full Moon to the New) is a time for study, meditation, and little magical work (except magic designed to banish harmful energies).

Moon phase: Third Quarter

Moon Sign: Leo
Leo: Draws emphasis to the self, central ideas, or institutions, away from connections with others and other emotional needs. People tend to be melodramatic.

Incense: Heliotrope

Color: Yellow

Sunday

Winter Night // Winter Collection Blingee

Sunday

Ruler: Sun

Colors: Gold or yellow

Power Hours: Sunrise and sunset.

Key Words: Love, happiness, health, wealth

It is easy to spot the ruler of this day by its name. Sunday is the day of the sun. Community work, volunteer services, exercise, outdoor sports, buying, selling, speculating, meeting people, anything involving groups, running fairs and raffles, growing crops and taking care of all health matters fall under the influence of the Sun. With all this activity and the brightness of the sun, it’s easy to see why the child that is born on the Sabbath day is bonny and blithe, and good and gay.

Michael is the primary angel of Sunday but each hour of this day also has it’s secondary angel. These angels are Michael (first hour), Anael (second hour), Raphael (third hour), Gabril (fourth hour), Cassiel (fifth hour), Sachiel (sixth hour), Samael (seventh hour), Michael (eighth hour), Anael (ninth hour), Raphael (tenth hour), Gabriel (eleventh hour), and Cassiel twelfth hour). Notice some of the angels do double duty this day.

On Sundays, (unless you are invoking a specific angelic energy) the hour of sunrise will be the most powerful time to work, especially if you want to infuse energy into your work. Sunset is the second best time and is favored when you need to calm down a situation. Check the local newspaper, astrological calendar, or almanac to determine your local sunrise.

Source:
Gypsy Magic

Sunday Conjuring

wolves
Sunday Conjuring

Sunday – is associated with the Sun

Candle colors – Red, Gold, and Orange

This is a Leo’s power day, Power, Health, Success, Personal Finances, Prosperity, Home life, Control, Hotfoot work, Shut your mouth conjure, Sunday is good for all hot work.

 

—Starr Casas, Old Style Conjure Wisdoms, Workings and Remedies

Home & Hearth Magick for Sunday, January 17th

Blessed Be

Home & Hearth Magick for Sunday, January 17th

On Sunday, work for success, healing and blessings.

Planetary Influence: The Sun

Household Symbols: A rooster, a sun, gold jewelry

Colors: Yellow and gold

Kitchen Spices: Cinnamon and orange peels

Source:
Cottage Witchery, Natural Magick for Hearth and Home
Author: Ellen Dugan

 

The Witches Almanac for Sunday, January 17th

Wiccan Blessings
The Witches Almanac for Sunday, January 17th

Sunday(Sun): Healing, spirituality, success, strength and protection.

St. Anthony’s Day (Mexican)

Waxing Moon
The Waxing Moon (from the New Moon to the Full) is the ideal time for magic to draw things toward you.

Moon phase: Second Quarter

Moon Sign: Aries
Aries: Good for starting things, but lacks staying power. Things occur rapidly, but quickly pass. People tend to be argumentative and assertive.

Moon enters Taurus 12: 48 am
Taurus: Things begun now last the longest, tend to increase in value, and become hard to alter. Brings out appreciation for beauty and sensory experience.

Incense: Hyacinth

Color: Gold