Wednesday

-Season of the witch-

Wednesday

Ruler: Wodin, Mercury

Colors: Orange, light blue, and gray

Power Hours: Sunrise and the 8th, 16th, and 24th hours following

Keywords: Success, creativity, communication

The word Wednesday is reminiscent of the Norse wind god Wodin, which is referenced in the popular rhyme verse “Wednesday’s child is full of woe.” This does not mean that those born on this day are full of sorrow or trouble. To be full of Woden (Wodin) means to be full of wind, to be spirited. Woden was such a powerful pagan god that the German church fathers changed the name of his day to Mittwoch, meaning midweek, in an attempt to exorcise his influence.

In the Spanish word for Wednesday, miercoles, we clearly see its connection to Mercury. Under the guidance of Mercury; Wednesday is a day of swift activity, communication, correspondence, and phone calls. This is a good day for journalists, writers, poets, bargaining, hiring employees, and visiting friends.

On Wednesdays, the hour of sunrise and every eight hours after that are also ruled by Mercury, making these times of the day doubly blessed. These are the strongest four hours for ritual work. Check your local newspaper, astrological calendar, or almanac to determine when sunrise occurs.
 

Source

Gypsy Magic

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Wednesday

¸.•*´¨`*•Goddess of the Night Sea ○ Shimmer¸.•*´¨`*•
Wednesday

Odin and Wodan’s day

Wednesday is the day third of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but some countries counts it as the fourth day of the week.

Odin – the Norse god
Wednesday between Tuesday and Thursday and is named after Germanic god Wodan and Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

Naming Wednesday
The English, the word Wednesday is derived from Old English and literally means “Wodan’s day”. The Germanic god Wodan is also known as Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

In most languages with Latin origins, the day is named after the god and planet Mercury.

Middle English – wodnesday or wednesday or wednesdai

Old English – wōdnesdæg – Woden’s day

Latin – dies Mercurii – “Day of Mercury”

Ancient Greek – hemera Hermu – “day of Hermes”

Third day of the Week
Wednesday is the third day of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but in the US, Canada, and Japan it’s counted as the fourth day if the week. It is in the middle of the common 5-day work week that starts on Monday and ends on Friday. It is also the middle day in the seven day week that starts on Sunday and ends on Saturday.

“Hump day”
Wednesday is sometimes referred to as “hump day” in American English slang meaning that one has made it “over the hump” of the work week.
 

Source

timeanddate.com

Wednesday – Odin and Wodan’s day

WiNtER ChAlLeNgE
Wednesday – Odin and Wodan’s day

Wednesday is the day third of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but some countries counts it as the fourth day of the week.

Odin – the Norse god
Wednesday between Tuesday and Thursday and is named after Germanic god Wodan and Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

Naming Wednesday
The English, the word Wednesday is derived from Old English and literally means “Wodan’s day”. The Germanic god Wodan is also known as Odin, the Norse all father of the gods.

In most languages with Latin origins, the day is named after the god and planet Mercury.

Middle English – wodnesday or wednesday or wednesdai

Old English – wōdnesdæg – Woden’s day

Latin – dies Mercurii – “Day of Mercury”

Ancient Greek – hemera Hermu – “day of Hermes”

Third day of the Week
Wednesday is the third day of the week according to the international standard ISO 8601, but in the US, Canada, and Japan it’s counted as the fourth day if the week. It is in the middle of the common 5-day work week that starts on Monday and ends on Friday. It is also the middle day in the seven day week that starts on Sunday and ends on Saturday.

“Hump day”
Wednesday is sometimes referred to as “hump day” in American English slang meaning that one has made it “over the hump” of the work week.
Source:

timeanddate.com