The Wicca Book of Days for Saturday, October 3rd – Wine for Well-being


Gothic Comments
Wine for Well-being

Although its details have been obscured by the passing of time, it is likely that a festival name the Meditrinalia was celebrated in Rome on this day. Essentially a wine festival, when all vintages were enjoyed, the Meditrinalia was dedicated to meditrina, a Roman goddess of healing who was said to use wine, herbs and magick as curatives. As they imbibed people recited the following words: novum vetus vinum bibo, novo veteri, morbo medeor (Latin for “new and old wine I drink, of disease new and old I’m cured”).

 

The Empress

Today, editate on the major arcana Tarot card of the Empress (number III). A crowned and enthroned woman is pictured holding a scepter in her right hand, often surrounded by fertility symbols. She signifies the pinnacle of feminine achievement on Earth, and may also represent female fecundity.

 

The Wicca Book of Days
Selena Eilidh Ash

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Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Festival of Luna

August 24th

Festival of Luna

 

Luna, the Roman Goddess of the moon, often identified with Selene, the Greek Goddess of the moon. Her temple was on the Aventine Hill, and there was another temple to Luna “Noctiluca” (Luna that shines by night) on the Palatine Hill. It was during Luna’s festival that the cover was removed from the mundus-ritual pit. This allowed the spirits of the Underworld to roam free. Thus, all public business was forbidden. Her other festivals were held on August 28 and March 28, at which times the focal point was again the removal of the mundus. It is likely that all secular activities were ceased at these times so as not to disturb or anger the spirits, should they damage the crops or obstruct planting and harvest activities.

 

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Festival of Kukulcan

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November 21

Festival of Kukulcan

It was on this day that the ancient Mayan people paid homage to the God Kukulcan. His name means “the feathered snake whose path is the water.” Later merged with Quetzalcoatl (Plumed Serpent) he was the great God of wisdom, wind and fertility—the inventor of agriculture and the calendar. He was identified with Venus as the morning star and portrayed as a feathered serpent and sometimes as a bearded man. The Mayan religion permeated all aspects of life. Their festivals were times of great celebration and focused on seasonal changes and agriculture. Generally their festivals included games, feasting, dancing and human sacrifice.

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Oct. 8th, Chung Yeung Day

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October 8th

Chung Yeung Day

Chung Yeung Day, the Festival of High Places is China’s annual good luck festival commemorating the ancient Chinese scholar, Haun Ching. Legend has it that on the advice of a fortune-teller, Haun fled with his family and friends to the high hills, thus avoiding the plague of death that killed everyone in the village below. During this mid-Autumn celebration, the people take to the hills and fly special kites that are considered to be good omens that drive the evil spirits away.

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Laguna Indian San Jose Day

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 18 and 19 September

Laguna Indian San Jose Day

During the late Summer and early Fall, the southwestern part of the United States supports an array of fiestas that honor various Catholic saints and feature elaborate processions, markets, dancing, and entertainment. The Laguna festival honoring Saint Joseph is a prime example. The pueblo of Laguna, some 45 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico, was established in 1697. Soon after, a Catholic mission was built there and became the official site of the festival. The origins of the festival have been lost over time, but more than likely they revolved around the mission’s patron Saint Joseph and the plentiful late Summer harvest. Today the festival still attracts thousands of people for the two-day celebration. The fiesta begins with a procession for Saint Joseph from the mission to the fairgrounds, which is followed by a noontime harvest and corn dance. After the official opening of the festival, the adults flock to the enormous market for the exchange of local products and food, while the children enjoy carnival rides and games. The fiesta concludes with demonstration dances performed by local Indian tribes and the return of the statue of Saint Joseph to the mission.

 

Celebrating Wiccan Spirituality: Spells, Sacred Rites, and Folklore for Each Day of the Year
By Lady Sabrina

Celebrating 365 Days A Year Spirituality – Chung Yeung Day

pagan19

October 8

Chung Yeung Day

Chung Yeung Day, the Festival of High Places is China’s annual good luck festival commemorating the ancient Chinese scholar, Haun Ching. Legend has it that on the advice of a fortune-teller, Haun fled with his family and friends to the high hills, thus avoiding the plague of death that killed everyone in the village below. During this mid-Autumn celebration, the people take to the hills and fly special kites that are considered to be good omens that drive the evil spirits away

Celebrating Our Spirituality for Sept. 7 – Kermesse

Gypsy Comments & Graphics

September 7

Kermesse

This unique festival dates back to 15th-century Germany. Traditionally, this weeklong celebration focused on the digging up of an effigy that had been buried the year before. The object was ritually unearthed and then mounted on a brightly decorated pole that was paraded through the streets to announce the beginning of the festival. The opening procession was followed by a week of games, feasting and dancing. At the end of the festival, the participant would dress up in their mourning attire and rebury the effigy in its grave, where it would remain until the next Kermesse.

This unique festival dates back to 15th-century Germany. Traditionally, this weeklong celebration focused on the digging up of an effigy that had been buried the year before. The object was ritually unearthed and then mounted on a brightly decorated pole that was paraded through the streets to announce the beginning of the festival. The opening procession was followed by a week of games, feasting and dancing. At the end of the festival, the participant would dress up in their mourning attire and rebury the effigy in its grave, where it would remain until the next Kermesse.

Goddess Of The Day: THALIA

 

Goddess Of The Day: THALIA

Feast of Fools (Europe)

Themes: Humor; Festivity; Recreation

Symbols: Party Decorations

About Thalia:

Among the Greek muses, Thalia is the goddess of festivity and humor. She inspires today’s celebration with unbridled revelry and joyfulness to round out the year on a playful, upbeat note.

To Do Today:

During the Middle Ages, around this time of year, a mock religious ritual took place, much like the impious Saturnalia. Normal roles were often reversed, and reverence went by the wayside, replaced by fun and pleasure.

I see no reason not to follow the example of our ancestors and give ourselves time to frolic a bit today. Do something that energizes you, inspires you, or makes you laugh out loud. For example, throw yourself a party complete with silly decorations and hats. Watch your favorite comedy flicks with folks who make you feel good, and generally let Thalia live through (and in )in your pleasure.

To keep Thalia’s playful, enthusiastic energy with you, bless an amethyst ( for joy and luck), saying,

Thalia, inspire my humor and muse;
throughout my life, joy diffuse.
Carry this with you anytime you feel your sense of humor waning.

 

By Patricia Telesco