Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Oct. 7th, Kermesse

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Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year

October 7th

Kermesse

This unique festival dates back to 15th-century Germany. Traditionally, this weeklong celebration focused on the digging up of an effigy that had been buried the year before. The object was ritually unearthed and then mounted on a brightly decorated pole that was paraded through the streets to announce the beginning of the festival. The opening procession was followed by a week of games, feasting, and dancing. At the end of the festival, the participants would dress up in their mourning attire and rebury the effigy in its grave, where it would remain until the next Kermesse.

 

The Witches Almanac for Monday, October 7th

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The Witches Almanac for Monday, October 7th

Monday (Moon): Peace, sleep, healing, compassion, friends, psychic awareness, purification, and fertility

Kermesse (German)

Waxing Moon

The Waxing Moon is the ideal time for magick to draw things toward you.

Moon Phase:  First Quarter

Moon Sign:  Scorpio

Scorpio: Increases awareness of psychic power. Precipitates psychic crises and ends connections thoroughly. People tend to brood and become secretive.

Incense: Narcissus

Color: White

Celebrating Our Spirituality for Sept. 7 – Kermesse

Gypsy Comments & Graphics

September 7

Kermesse

This unique festival dates back to 15th-century Germany. Traditionally, this weeklong celebration focused on the digging up of an effigy that had been buried the year before. The object was ritually unearthed and then mounted on a brightly decorated pole that was paraded through the streets to announce the beginning of the festival. The opening procession was followed by a week of games, feasting and dancing. At the end of the festival, the participant would dress up in their mourning attire and rebury the effigy in its grave, where it would remain until the next Kermesse.

This unique festival dates back to 15th-century Germany. Traditionally, this weeklong celebration focused on the digging up of an effigy that had been buried the year before. The object was ritually unearthed and then mounted on a brightly decorated pole that was paraded through the streets to announce the beginning of the festival. The opening procession was followed by a week of games, feasting and dancing. At the end of the festival, the participant would dress up in their mourning attire and rebury the effigy in its grave, where it would remain until the next Kermesse.