Daily Feng Shui News for Dec. 31 – ‘New Year’s Eve Traditions’

Happy New Year’s Eve! If you want to attract more money in the coming year, then clean out your wallet of all old receipts and fill it with twenty-seven one dollar bills and forty-nine coins. Don’t forget to open your front door at midnight and throw both money and orange peels into the entryway. Leave them there until January second. The word ‘orange’ in Mandarin Chinese sounds exactly like the word for ‘gold,’ something it’s believed to attract. Opening all of the doors and the windows at midnight will also allow old or stuck energies to depart while inviting healthy, fresh and abundant ones to come and stay for the whole of your next fortune-filled New Year.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

Advertisements

Calendar of the Sun for December 31

Calendar of the Sun

31 Yulmonath

Hogmanay

Color: Brown
Element: Earth
Altar: Upon a brown cloth set symbols of all the projects around the house that need to be finished, as well as a bottle of wine or beer and cups.
Offerings: Cleaning and finishing projects.
Daily Meal: Leftovers.

Hogmanay Invocation

We stand at the turning of the year,
In the place predicted by the Fates.
We are here because this time, this place
Is where we were destined to be,
Though we never knew before this moment,
We could not have seen this time and place.
Yet here we are, standing together with each other,
Hand to hand, soul to soul, with open eyes.
Yet well we know that nothing lasts forever,
And things well begun should not be left half done.
So it is that we shall take up the tools
And finish those things left undone,
Tying up the strings of our existence
Before the turning of the New Year
And the coming of the Fates yet again.
Hail to the Fates! We await your day,
And the next year, to see what it may bring.

(Each goes forth and takes up the symbol of some thing that is yet undone around the House, and declares that they will do it, and what it will mean for them to complete that task. Then the wine is shared around, a toast is made to the new year, and the rest is poured out as a libation.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Mumming, New Year’s Eve, Hogmany

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year

December 30 and 31

Mumming, New Year’s Eve, Hogmany

The end of December ushers in the New Year, a time of anticipation and celebration. For our pre-Christian ancestors, most of the New Year’s festivities were designed to ward off the barrenness of Winter and insure the fertility of Spring. This was accomplished with the actual or symbolic killing of the king of the old year and the welcoming of a new king—a metaphor still dramatized in the popular British mumming play.

It was during the 19th century, when the hustle of the Christmas Day celebrations were over and the new year was fast approaching, that the mummers took to the streets, pubs, and private homes to act our their plays. Masked and costumed, they portrayed three different themes: the Hero-Combat of St. George, the “Sword Dance,” and the Plough or Wooing play. Of the three, the Hero-Combat was the most favored.

The central part of the play begins with the Hero fighting an opposing champion or, occasionally a whole succession of enemies—the Black Prince, the Turkish Knight, or the Bold Slasher. After a spirited battle, in most but not all cases, the villain is slain. Suddenly a doctor appears, who boast lengthily (with a great deal of buffoonery) of his skill and travels, after which the dead man suddenly regenerates. Once the mummers have been paid, they journey to their next performance.

It might not be as well know as Christmas or New Year’s Eve, but Hogmanay is still celebrated in parts of England and Scotland. Although the word Hogmanay has never been satisfactorily established, it very well may come from the Anglo-Saxon Haleg Monath (Holy Month) or from the giant Gogmagog or Hogmagog, guardians of the cities of London and Plymouth. For the most part, Hogmanay is met with massive enthusiasm. Parties are held, people ring bells, fireworks are set off, and everyone makes a conscious effort to make a clean break with the past by making New Year’s resolutions.

Scotland has always made more of Hogmanay than England and still has a variety of customs associated with the holiday. Some of these include divination, of which Bibliomancy is the most popular. The Family Bible is prayed over, and then the person Seeking his or her future will open the Bible at random. Without looking, a verse is marked with the index finger and then read. Whatever the verse discusses will be the person’s fortune for the year. Another popular custom is to open the back door of the home and then close it just before midnight to let out all of the bad luck. At the stroke of midnight, the  front door is then opened to let in the good luck. Finally, Hogmanay is a favored time for predicting the weather by observing the direction of the wind with this old Scots rhyme:

“If New Year’s Eve night-wind blow south, That betokens warmths and growth. If
west, much milk, and fish in the sea, If north, much cold and storms will be. If east,
the trees will bear much fruit, If north-east, flee it, man and brute.”

 

Tuesday Is Ruled By Mars

Tuesday Is Ruled By Mars

Archangel: Samael

Candle colour: Red

Incenses: Dragon’s blood or cinnamon

Crystals: Jasper or garnet

Use Tuesdays for spells for courage, change, independence in home or business life, for overcoming seemingly impossible odds and for passion.

Where possible, work near a fire or a bonfire or with a huge red beeswax candle as a focus; alternatively work next to a flowerbed or large vase of red, orange and/or yellow flowers.

The Witches Almanac for Tuesday, December 31

The Witches Almanac for Tuesday, December 31

Tuesday (Mars): Passion, sex, courage, aggression and protection.

New Year’s Eve

Waning Moon

The Waning Moon is a time for study, meditation, and little magickal work (except magick designed to banish harmful energies).

Moon Sign: Sagittarius

Sagittarius: Encourages flights of imagination and confidence. This is an adventurous, philosophical, and athletic Moon sign. Favors expansion and growth.

Moon Phase: Fourth Quarter

Moon enters Capricorn 1:01 pm

Capricorn: Develops strong structure. Focus on traditions, responsibilties, and obligations. A good time to set boundaries and rules.

Incense: Ginger

Color: Ivory

Monday, Monday, Oh It’s Monday Again! Happy & Blessed Monday To All The Witches Of The Craft!

Oh, well if you had a Monday like we are having around here, you might feel the same way. We have contractors running out of our ears. And to think this place was once so peaceful, AH! Hammers banging, wood being threw about, gee! We got up once and went to the other side of the building and be darned if they didn’t follow us over there. But at least we are getting everything fixed, FINALLY!

 

Now changing the subject, Mystie and myself had numerous animal calls this weekend. We had so many I am going to apply for the Animal Warden’s job before its over with, lol! But we are currently swamped with animal and needs some help. We are currently running low on baby bottles, formula, feed, cat food, straw and a few other things. We are in need of donations desperately. We have so many animals and any amount can help. You don’t realize how much cat food a $1.00 will buy. That is why we say no amount is too small and is always greatly appreciated. I have took some photos of our latest arrivals, so you can see were your donations are going and who they are benefiting.

Thank you so much for your help,

Lady A

 

hawkwithhurtwing Hawk recovering from arrow in wing

babydeer

Orphaned baby deer being fed with bottle

babypiglets

How we managed baby piglets I don’t know. They were found out in a field by theirselves and we were called.

 kittens

Mystie had their attention with a ribbon. Ain’t they adorable?

Now you see, we are desperately needing donations. Anything you can give, we will appreciate and so will the animals.

Thank you again.

More Monday Comments

Shout It To The Rooftops, “GOOD GLORIOUS MORNING TO ALL MY DEAR FAMILY & FRIENDS!”

 

 

Good Glorious Sunday Morning To Everyone!

 

May the nourishment of the earth be yours,

May the clarity of light be yours,        

May the fluency of the ocean be yours,        

May  the protection of the ancestors be yours.

Today and evermore…..

 

More New Year Resolutions Comments

Your Rune For August 21 is Thurisaz


Your Rune For Today

Thurisaz       

Thurisaz embodies the polarity of life and death and the struggle to keep them in balance. Expect conflict, hardship and obstacles, but be assured that remaining focused and in touch with your inner strengths will see you through whatever comes your way. This Rune may also represent protection from your enemies, which is never a bad thing.

History of Litha

The History Of Litha

 

The celebration of Midsummer’s Eve (St. John’s Eve among Christians) was from ancient times a festival of the summer solstice. Some people believed that golden-flowered mid-summer plants, especially Calendula, and St. John’s Wort, had miraculous healing powers and they therefore picked them on this night. Bonfires were lit to protect against evil spirits which were believed to roam freely when the sun was turning southwards again. In later years, witches were also thought to be on their way to meetings with other powerful beings.

In Sweden, Mid-summer celebration originates from the time before Christianity; it was celebrated as a sacrifice time in the sign of the fertility.

The solstice itself has remained a special moment of the annual cycle of the year since Neolithic times. The concentration of the observance is not on the day as we reckon it, commencing at midnight or at dawn, as it is customary for cultures following lunar calendars to place the beginning of the day on the previous eve at dusk at the moment when the Sun has set. In Sweden, Finland and Estonia, Midsummer’s Eve is the greatest festival of the year, comparable only with Walpurgis Night, Christmas Eve, and New Year’s Eve.

In the 7th century, Saint Eligius (died 659/60) warned the recently converted inhabitants of Flanders against the age-old pagan solstice celebrations. According to the Vita by his companion Ouen, he’d say: “No Christian on the feast of Saint John or the solemnity of any other saint performs solestitia [summer solstice rites] or dancing or leaping or diabolical chants.”

As Christianity entered pagan areas, MidSummer celebrations came to be often borrowed and transferred into new Christian holidays, often resulting in celebrations that mixed Christian traditions with traditions derived from pagan Midsummer festivities. The 13th-century monk of Winchcomb, Gloucestershire, who compiled a book of sermons for the feast days, recorded how St. John’s Eve was celebrated in his time:

Let us speak of the revels which are accustomed to be made on St. John’s Eve, of which there are three kinds. On St. John’s Eve in certain regions the boys collect bones and certain other rubbish, and burn them, and therefrom a smoke is produced on the air. They also make brands and go about the fields with the brands. Thirdly, the wheel which they roll.

The fires, explained the monk of Winchcombe, were to drive away dragons, which were abroad on St. John’s Eve, poisoning springs and wells. The wheel that was rolled downhill he gave its explicitly solstitial explanation:

The wheel is rolled to signify that the sun then rises to the highest point of its circle and at once turns back; thence it comes that the wheel is rolled.

On St John’s Day 1333 Petrarch watched women at Cologne rinsing their hands and arms in the Rhine “so that the threatening calamities of the coming year might be washed away by bathing in the river.”

April 9 – Daily Feast

April 9 – Daily Feast

A problem of recent times is that we do not have a set of values by which we can live. If we are to live well and be reasonably happy, we have to have an idea of who we are and where we are going. There must be rules to guide us. Tsu gv wa lo di I to the Cherokee means a definite standard by which to live, even when the values of others change by the hour. Without it, we are rafts on a high tide with no direction and no control. If the standard is missing we go with whatever comes along. Even is rules are self-made and are late in coming, if they come at all, it is worth the effort. And if we hold to them with a passion, they will be worth whatever we had to do, whatever we have to give up, to follow.

~ When a child, my mother taught me….to kneel and pray to Usen for strength, health, wisdom, and protection. ~

GERONIMO

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days’, by Joyce Sequichie Hifler