Till tomorrow, my sweets….

Circle Is Open Pictures

Did we surprise you? I am talking about the weekly readings. I couldn’t see you wanting Today’s Tarot Card or Rune at 2:00 in the afternoon. So that is why we did the weekly forecast for today. I apologize for us running so late today. It seems like a Monday to me (well as least that is what I am blaming it on, lol!). I promise we will be earlier tomorrow. It just hit me, I can blame it on astrology for a change. Moon in Pisces, yeah that’s it! I am a Pisces. I know it is a poor excuse, but what can I say.

Anyway, I hope you have a very blessed New Moon. I am not going to mention the Eclipse because none of us have even looked up for our area yet. After I run to town again, I will have to do that.

Till then…

Luv & Hugs,

Lady A

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A Little Humor for Your Day – Tarot for the Computer Age

Tarot for the Computer Age

0. The FOOL: a manager using a SPARCStation 413,1432 to run a screensaver.

1. The MAGICIAN: a hacker with a Mac, a Pentium box, a Sparc, and a Cray on the table in front of him — all running the same program with the same GUI. An infinity sign is over his head.

2. The HIGH PRIESTESS: a woman holding the Documentation, closed and concealed. The crescent moon is showing on an Indigo behind her..

3. The EMPEROR: Steve Jobs sitting on a NeXT cube, holding an optical disk vertically in his hand.

4. The EMPRESS: A secretary with a NeXT Machine.

5. The HEIROPHANT: Bill Gates with two flunkies kneeling before him, their faces averted, offering him floppy disks. He wears a laptop computer on his head.

6. The LOVERS: a PowerMAC and an IBM Power PC exchanging software as an angel bathed in glory regards them.

7. The CHARIOT: A man in a chariot, hurtling up an exponential curve, drawn by the twin sphinxes of Technology (black) and Culture (white).

8. STRENGTH: A woman holding the entire design and implementation of Microsoft Excel in her mind as she corrects the final error. An infinity sign is over her head.

9. The HERMIT: An old hacker, white-bearded, burns the midnight oil; its Star-of-David flame illuminates his keyboard.

10. The WHEEL OF FORTUNE: A rotating wheel. Cray is on the side going down, despite its good technology; Smalltalk is opposite it, and C++ is sitting on top. Four winged beings — a mouse, a turtle, a dog-cow, and a human — look on.

11. JUSTICE. A cold-faced woman holds a calculator in one hand and a delete-key in the other.

12. The HANGED MAN: A programmer is tied by his ankle to a cable duct. His phase is completely shifted: he awakens at sunset, he sleeps at dawn. His monitor is reverse-video. He programs on, flawlessly, oblivious to his circumstances.

13. DEATH: A skeleton wielding a scythe surveys a field, on which are scattered PDP-11s, Apple ][‘s, IBM 360/91’s, Xerox Alto’s, and many other machines.

14. TEMPERANCE: An angel stands with one foot on her chair and one on the floor, as she copies files from one disk to another. A cursor blinks from her chest.

15. The DEVIL: The goat-headed Lord of the Pit stands on a pile of Windows manuals, holding an inverted torch in one hand. Two humans, male and female, are in chains at his feet.

16. The TOWER: An ivory tower is struck by a bolt of lightning. Two robed figures, denied tenure, are hurtled to the ground.

17. The STAR: A Mac is running its `warp’ screen saver, in a transient fragile moment of peace.

18. The MOON: A wolf and a jackal are typing at two PC’s. A crayfish crawls out of a pool, offering suggestions that may ultimately prove deadly. The moon shines through a window.

19. The SUN: A naked child riding a winged rocking horse programs clever applications on a high-quality workstation.

20. JUDGEMENT: An angel blows a trumpet; all over the net, web pages arise, to be rated Cool or not.

21. The WORLD: A woman dances on the clouds, unclothed, unencumbered, in a ring of clouds, a 3-d mouse in each hand. The four winged beings from the Wheel of Fortune surround her.

 

Source

eCauldron

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Solar Eclipse Shoes in the Classroom

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2016 March 8

Solar Eclipse Shoes in the Classroom
Image Credit & Copyright: Astronomie-AG, Progymnasium Rosenfeld, Till Credner, AlltheSky.com

 

Explanation: The total solar eclipse of March 8/9 will be the only total eclipse in 2016. Crossing the international date line, the New Moon’s dark shadow traces a limited, narrow path for viewing the total phase, making landfall in Indonesia and mostly tracking across the Pacific Ocean. A much larger region will be witness to a partially eclipsed Sun though, during morning hours on March 9 for southeast Asia and northeast Australia, and before sunset March 8 for Hawaii and Alaska. Safely viewing the eclipse can actually be very easy. One technique is demonstrated in this shoe group portrait from a classroom in Rosenfeld, Germany, taken during March 2015’s solar eclipse. With blinds closed to darken the room, each threaded hole in the window blind creates a pinhole camera, projecting multiple images of the eclipsed sun that march across the floor. Other viewing alternatives include eclipse glasses and a comfortable chair, but be sure to wear a fashionable eclipse shirt.

Earth Sky News for March 8th: Supermoon total solar eclipse March 8-9

Supermoon total solar eclipse March 8-9

 

The moon turns new on March 8 or 9, 2016, depending on your time zone. The new moon happens one day before the moon reaches lunar perigee – the moon’s closest point to Earth in its orbit. Thus this new moon counts as a supermoon. It won’t be visible in our sky, but it’ll line up with the sun to create a larger-than-average effect on Earth’s oceans. Plus this new supermoon swings right in front of the sun, so if you’re at the right place on Earth, you might be able to view the new moon silhouette in front of the sun (but remember to use proper eye protection). The eclipse will begin at 23:19 UTC on March 8, 2016, and its maximum point will take place at 01:59 UTC on March 9, 2016. Totality will last for 4 minutes and 9 seconds.

Who will see the March 8-9 eclipse? Note on the worldwide map above that the path of totality (in dark blue) passes mainly over the waters of the Pacific Ocean. Only those along that long yet narrow path can see the total eclipse of the sun. The path of totality starts at sunrise in the Indian Ocean to the west of Indonesia, and then goes eastward across the Indian and Pacific Oceans until it ends to the west of North America at sunset.

On a worldwide scale, the whole total eclipse from start to finish lasts for over three and one-third hours, yet at any point on the Earth’s surface, the maximum duration for the total eclipse is just over four minutes. The black dot on the animation to the right shows the path of totality whereas the larger gray circle depicts where a partial solar eclipse is visible.

The best spots to watch this total solar eclipse from land are the various islands in Indonesia, which reside on the path of totality.

A much larger swath of the world gets to see varying degrees of a partial solar eclipse. Hawaii and Alaska see the partial eclipse at late afternoon on March 8, while south and eastern Asia, Korea, Japan, north and western Australia see it on the morning of March 9.

March 9, 2016 total eclipse times from land

Palembang, South Sumatra, Indonesia
Partial solar eclipse begins: 6:20 a.m. local Western Indonesian Time
Total solar eclipse begins: 7:20 a.m. local time
Maximum eclipse: 7:21 a.m. local time
Total solar eclipse ends: 7:22 a.m. local time
Partial solar eclipse ends: 8:31 a.m. local time

Balikpapan, East Kalimantan, Indonesia
Partial solar eclipse begins: 7:25 a.m. local Central Indonesian Time
Total solar eclipse begins: 8:33 a.m. local time
Maximum eclipse: 8:34 local time
Total solar eclipse ends: 8:34 a.m. local time
Partial solar eclipse ends: 9:53 a.m. local time

Sofifi, North Maluhu, Indonesia
Partial solar eclipse begins: 8:36 a.m. local Eastern Indonesian Time
Total solar eclipse begins: 9:51 a.m. local time
Maximum eclipse: 9:53 local time
Total solar eclipse ends: 9:54 a.m. local time
Partial solar eclipse ends: 11:21 a.m. local time

Source: TimeandDate.com

March 8, 2016 partial eclipse times

Honolulu, Hawaii
Solar eclipse begins: 4:33 p.m. local Hawaii-Aleutian Standard Time
Greatest eclipse: 5:36 p.m. local time
Solar eclipse ends: 6:33 p.m. local time
Maximum obscuration of solar disk: 63.4%

Anchorage, Alaska
Solar eclipse begins: 5:38 p.m. local Alaska Standard Time
Greatest eclipse: 6:12 p.m. local time
Solar eclipse ends: 6:45 p.m. local time
Maximum obscuration of solar disk: 9.5%

March 9, 2016 partial eclipse times

Hong Kong, China
Solar eclipse begins: 8:05 a.m. local Hong Kong Time
Greatest eclipse: 8:58 a.m. local time
Solar eclipse ends: 9:56 a.m. local time
Maximum obscuration of solar disk: 22%

Darwin, Australia
Solar eclipse begins: 9:07 a.m. local Japan Standard Time
Greatest eclipse: 10:17 a.m. local time
Solar eclipse ends: 11:34 a.m. local time
Maximum obscuration of solar disk: 50.3%

Tokyo, Japan
Solar eclipse begins: 10:12 a.m. local Japan Standard Time
Greatest eclipse: 11:08 a.m. local time
Solar eclipse ends: 12:05 p.m. local time
Maximum obscuration of solar disk: 15.4%

What causes a solar eclipse?

A solar eclipse happens whenever the new moon passes in front of the sun, and the moon’s shadow falls on our planet. A solar eclipse is only possible at new moon because that’s the only time whereby the moon can go in front of the sun, as seen from Earth. Most of the time, however, the new moon either swings north or south of the solar disk, so no eclipse of the sun takes place.

The plane of the moon’s orbit around Earth is inclined at 5o to the plane of the Earth’s orbit around the sun. For half the month, the moon orbits Earth to the north of the ecliptic (Earth’s orbital plane); and for the other half of the month, the moon orbits Earth to the south of the ecliptic (Earth’s orbital plane). Twice a month, the moon crosses the Earth’s orbital plane at points called nodes. If the moon is traveling from north to south, it’s called a descending node, and when it’s going from south to north, it’s called an ascending node.

When a new moon happens while the moon is appreciably close to one of its nodes, a solar eclipse is not only possible – but inevitable. This time around, the moon reaches its descending node only about 5 hours after the moon turns new. The close coincidence of new moon with its descending node means the moon’s dark umbral shadow will cross the Earth’s surface for about 3 and one-third hours, the long umbra track covering about 14,200 kilometers (8,820 miles) on the Earth’s surface, though with a width of only 156 kilometers (97 miles) at its widest point.

Bottom line: On March 8-9, 2016 the larger-than-average new supermoon swings right in front of the sun to totally block out the solar disk. Although you have to be at the just right spot on Earth to witness this total eclipse of the sun (Indonesia), a much larger swath of the world gets to see varying degrees of a partial solar eclipse (south and east Asia, Japan, Korea, Australia, Hawaii and Alaska). Remember to use proper eye protection!

Author

Bruce McClure

Your Weekly Influences for March 7th

Your Weekly Influences for March 7th

 

Six of Pentacles Reversed
Gloating of wealth and jealousy. Possessions may be in jeopardy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mannaz
Now is the time for you to explore your inner self and those of others. Your intelligence and creativity are very well honed at the moment. Cooperation from and with others should be very easy to attain.

 

 

 

Scorpio the Scorpion
This aspect of your life will be strongly influenced by a person who is jealous, resentful, compulsive, obsessive, secretive and obstinate. This person is a relative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Weekly Influences represent events and challenges this current week will present for you. They may represent opportunities you should be ready to seize. Or they may forewarn you of problems you may be able to avoid or lessen. Generally it is best to use them as tips to help you manage your week and nothing more.

Your Weekly MahJong Reading for March 7th

Your Weekly MahJong Reading for March 7th

 

That Which is Behind You

Circles 3
Symbol: Phoenix

The Phoenix tile indicates great happiness and joy. The Phoenix is said to be reborn out its ashes. Accordingly the Phoenix tile also denotes sure recovery from any setbacks encountered.

 

 

Your Current Place

Circles 2
Symbol: Pine Tree

The Pine Tree tile represents strength and resolve. It often refers to a powerful, determined man. While powerful, this person is not violent, but very skilled in attaining his goals through diplomacy.

 

 

That Which is Before You

Bamboo 2
Symbol: Duck

The Duck tile symbolizes a long lasting relationship with the strength to overcome all obstacles. It suggests fidelity and trustworthiness as well. Regardless of the type of partnership in question, the 2 Bamboo tile indicates a strong, healthy relationship.

Your Animal Spirit Reading for the Week of March 7th

Your Animal Spirit Reading for the Week of March 7th

 

 

That Which is Behind You

Opossum
You’ve heard the expression “playing possum”? It means to play dead and is derived from Opossum’s ability to act in whatever way the situation demands. If it’s practical to play dead, so be it; if it’s to Opossum’s advantage to be aggressive, watch out! Take your cue from this master actor this week—and play the role that will serve you best.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Current Place

Beaver
Beaver may be one of the hardest working animals on the planet. Beaver is attuned to both earth and water medicine, and is strongly attached to home and family. Beaver appears in your reading to remind you that sometimes there’s no substitute for hard work. Make a plan, create a solid foundation, then take the next indicated step.

 

 

 

 

 

That Which is before You

Squirrel
Hoard, hoard, hoard! Squirrel has been a busy fellow, gathering food for the long winter ahead—and he advises you to do the same. Have you set enough money aside to get you through lean times, or do you squander what you earn? We all love a shopping spree, but if Squirrel scurries into your reading, he’s cautioning you to spend a little, but also save a little.