Magick & Wicca

MAGICK & WICCA
The Wicca Handbook by Eileen Holland

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Magick is love. All magick should be performed out of love. The moment anger or hatred tinges your magick you have crossed the border into a dangerous world, one that will ultimately consume you.
– Scott Cunningham
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Magick itself is neutral, a tool: like a hammer, it can be used to smash or to
build. Intent is what colors it. White magick is a term to describe that which
is positive, constructive or helpful; black magick that which is negative,
destructive or harmful. If you have a business and you work spells to make it
prosper, that’s white magick. Doing spells to destroy your competition would be
black magick. These are not racial terms: good and evil, dark and light, are
other words which can be used to express this same concept.

Why black and white, not some other colors? To answer this you have to go back
into prehistory and imagine how terrifying the night was for humans before we
learned to use fire. The black of night was full of unseen threats, a dangerous
time you might not survive. The white light of day brought illumination and
safety, welcome relief.

White magick is the right-hand path, black magick the left-hand one. The
symbolism of right and left is also very ancient: the right hand was used for
eating, the left hand for bathroom functions. Imagine life without toilet paper
and you’ll understand why it’s customary to shake right hands. This has nothing
to do with being right- or left- handed, but it does explain why left handed
people were often forced in the past to learn to write with their right hands.

There are several theories of gray magick, but I think gray magick is what
Hindus call maya – illusion.

One theory holds that since good and evil both exist, some people need to do
black magick in order to balance the white magick. I don’t buy that for a
minute. Do murderers balance nice people, or child abusers balance loving
parents? If they create balance, does this excuse their crimes? Try telling that
one to a judge! “Well your honor, I only stole that car to create balance in the
universe.” There is another polarity theory, where if you do two hexes and two
healings they balance one another or cancel each other out. There is some logic
to this one but its still just a self-serving excuse, a way to delude yourself
you are a white witch when you practice black magick. Some traditions hold that
which you cast on yourself as white magick, that which you cast on others gray
magick. The wordsmith in me quibbles with this one on semantic grounds. I think a spell that harms yourself or anyone else is black magick; one that helps or heals anyone, including yourself, is white magick. Being of service to people in
need or distress is one of the things witches do best, so I see nothing “wrong”
in casting spells that help others – with their permission, of course.

Some witches argue there are evils too great, situations too grave for white
magick to deal with; that the end justifies the means, makes black magick
necessary for the greater good. That is the best argument of the lot, but I have
never encountered a situation I couldn’t handle with white magick. Binding,
banishing and transformation are the powerful tools of a white witch. The term
green witchcraft is sometimes used to describe Celtic magick, fairy magick,
earth magick or any combination of those.

Seekers and novices sometimes ask me how they can avoid being seduced by the
dark side of magick, avoid the temptation to hex or harm others. The answer is
to have an ethical framework in which you practice magick. Seduction by the dark side is not a concern for Wiccans. We have our Goddess and our Law to guide us:

an it harm none, do as ye will.

Every Wiccan is a witch, and every one of us voluntarily agrees to do no harm.
We walk in the Light and serve the Goddess. Magick is just one part of our
religion.

There are excellent moral and ethical arguments against practicing black magick,
but if you don’t buy those here is a practical one:

what goes around comes around

Everything we put forth is eventually returned to us. Wicca recognizes the Law
of Three, believes this return is triple. Black magick might provide instant
gratification, but it ultimately does more harm to you than to anyone else. Many
white witches learned this lesson the hard way.

Principles of Wiccan Beliefs

Principles of Wiccan Beliefs

1.   We practice rites to attune ourselves with the natural rhythm of life
forces marked by the phases of the Moon and the seasonal Quarters and Cross
Quarter.

2.   We recognize that our intelligence gives us a unique responsibility toward
our environment. We seek to live in harmony with Nature, in ecological balance
offering fulfillment to life and consciousness within an evolutionary concept.

3.  We acknowledge a depth of power far greater than that apparent to the
average person. Because it is far greater than ordinary it is sometimes called
supernatural, but we see it as lying within that which is naturally potential to
all.

4.  We conceive of the Creative Power in the universe as manifesting through
polarity — as masculine and feminine  — and that this same Creative Power lies
in all people, and  functions through the interaction of  the masculine and
feminine. We value neither above the other, knowing each to be supportive to the other. We value sex as pleasure, as the symbol and embodiment of life, and as one of the sources of energies used in magickal practice and religious worship.

5.   We recognize both outer worlds and inner, or psychological, worlds
sometimes known as the Spiritual World, the Collective Unconscious, Inner
Planes, etc. — and we see in the inter-action of these two dimensions the basis
for paranormal phenomena and magickal exercises. We neglect neither dimension for the other, seeing both as necessary for our fulfillment.

6. We do not recognize any authoritarian hierarchy, but do honor those who
teach, respect those who share their greater knowledge and wisdom, and acknowledge those who have courageously given of themselves in leadership.

7.  We see religion, magick and wisdom in living as being united in the way one
views the world and lives within it — a world view and philosophy of life which
we identify as Witchcraft — the Wiccan Way.

8.   Calling oneself  “Witch” does not make a Witch  — but neither does
heredity itself, not the collecting of titles, degrees and initiations. A Witch
seeks to control the forces within her/himself that make life possible in order
to live wisely and well without harm to others and in harmony with Nature.

9.  We believe in the affirmation and fulfillment of life in a continuation of
evolution and development of consciousness giving meaning to the Universe we
know and our personal roll within it.

10.  Our only animosity towards Christianity, or towards any other religion or
philosophy of life, is to the extent that its institutions have claimed to be
“the only way” and have sought to deny freedom to others and to suppress other
ways of religious practice and belief.

11.  As American Witches, we are not threatened by debates on the history of
the Craft,  the origins of various terms, the legitimacy of various aspects of
different traditions. We are concerned with our present and our future.

12.  We do not accept the concept of absolute evil, nor do we worship any entity
known as “Satan” or “the Devil”, as defined by the Christian traditions. We do
not seek power through the suffering of others, nor accept that personal benefit
can be derived only by denial to another.

13.  We believe that we should seek within Nature that which is contributory to
our health and well being.

An Introduction to Traditional Wicca

AN INTRODUCTION TO TRADITIONAL WICCA
c. 1987, Keepers of the Ancient Mysteries   ( K.A.M. )

Often Traditional Wiccans are asked to describe our religion and beliefs for
interested people, who may or may not have confused us with other Pagan
religions, with inversions of Christian/Islamic religions like Satanism, or with
purely magical traditions with no religious base. There is a lot of flexibility
in the ways that we describe ourselves, and one characteristic of Wicca is a
large degree of personal liberty to practice as we please. Still, there is an
outline that can be described in general terms. Many traditions will depart from
one particular or another, but groups departing from all or most of these
features are probably non-Wiccan Traditions attempting to stretch or distort the
Wiccan name to cover what they want to do.

Mysteries and Initiation

Wicca is an Initiatory religion descended from the Ancient Mystery Religions. A
mystery religion is not like Catholicism where a Priest is the contact point
between the worshiper and the Deity, nor like Protestantism where a sacred Book provides the contact and guidelines for being with the divine. Rather a Mystery Religion is a religion of personal experience and responsibility, in which each worshiper is encouraged, taught and expected to develop an ongoing and positive direct relationship with the Gods. The religion is called a “Mystery” because such experiences are very hard to communicate in words, and are usually distorted in the telling. You have to have been there in person to appreciate what is meant. Near and far-Eastern religions like Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism and Shinto are probably Mystery traditions, but Wicca is very western in cultural flavor and quite different than eastern religions in many ways.

A Blend of Pagan Roots

Most Wiccan Traditions, K.A.M. included, have particular roots in the British
Mystery Traditions. This includes traditions of the Picts who lived before the
rise of Celtic consciousness, the early Celts, and some selected aspects of
Celtic Druidism. American Wicca is directly descended from British Wicca,
brought in the late 1950’s by English and American Initiates of Gardnerian,
Alexandrian and Celtic Wicca. These traditions are a little like the
denominations in Christianity, but hopefully far more harmonious.

While British Traditions are very strong in Wicca, or the Craft as it is
sometimes called, other Western Mystery traditions feature prominently,
including the ancient Greek Mysteries of Eleusis, Italian Mysteries of Rome,
Etruria and the general countryside, Mysteries of Egypt and Persia before Islam,
and various Babylonian, Assyrian and other mid-eastern Mysteries that flourished before the political rise of the advocates of “one god”.

What’s In a Name?

Wicca, Witchcraft, and “The Craft” are used interchangeably at times by many
kinds of people. It is fair to say that all Wiccans are Witches, and many of us
believe we are the only people entitled to the name. It is important to know
that many people call themselves witches who are not in the least Wiccan, and
that Masons also refer to themselves as “Craft”, with good historical precedent.
Carefully question people on the particular things they do and believe as part
of their religion rather than relying on labels. Any real Wiccan would welcome
such honest inquiry.

Traditions and Flavor

There are specific Wiccan beliefs and traditions, including worship of an equal
and mated Goddess and God who take many forms and have many Names. Groups who worship only a Goddess or only a God are not traditional Wicca however they may protest, although they may be perfectly good Pagans of another sort. The Wiccan Goddess and God are linked to nature, ordinary love and children — Wicca is very life affirming in flavor.

Because we have and love our own Gods, Wiccans have nothing to do with other
people’s deities or devils, like the Christian God or Satan, the Muslim Allah or
the Jewish Jehovah (reputedly not his real name). Christians often deny this
fact because they think that their particular god is the only God, and everybody
else in the whole world must be worshipping their devil. How arrogant. They’re
wrong on both counts.

Traditional Wicca is a religion of personal responsibility and growth. Initiates
take on a particular obligation to personal development throughout their lives,
and work hard to achieve what we call our “True Will”, which is the best
possibility that we can conceive for ourselves. Finding your Will isn’t easy,
and requires a lot of honesty, courage and hard work. It is also very rewarding.

Wicca is generally a cheerful religion, and has many holidays and festivals. In
fact, most of the more pleasant holidays now on our calendar are descended from the roots Wicca draws on, including Christmas, May Day, Easter and Summer Vacation. Wicca is definitely not always serious. Dancing, feasting and general merriment are a central part of the celebrations.

Wiccan Ethics

Wiccans have ethics which are different in nature than most “one-god” religions,
which hand out a list of “do’s and don’ts”. We have a single extremely powerful
ethical principal which Initiates are responsible for applying in specific
situations according to their best judgment. That principle is called the Wiccan
Rede (Old-English for rule) and reads:

“An (if) it harm none, do as ye Will”

Based on the earlier mention of “True Will”, you will understand that the Rede
is far more complex than it sounds, and is quite different than saying “Do
whatever you want as long as nobody is hurt”. Finding out your Will is difficult
sometimes, and figuring out what is harmful, rather than just painful or
unpleasant is not much easier.

Initiation into Wicca

People become Wiccans only by Initiation, which is a process of contacting and
forming a good relationship with the Gods and Goddesses of Wicca. Initiation is
preceded by at least a year and a day of preparation and study, and must be
performed by a qualified Wiccan Priestess and Priest. The central event of
Initiation is between you and your Gods, but the Priestess is necessary to make
the Initiation a Wiccan one, to pass some of her power onto you as a new-made
Priestess or Priest and to connect you to the Tradition you’re joining.

Women hold the central place in Wicca. A Traditional Coven is always headed by a High Priestess, a Third Degree female Witch with at least three years and three
days of specific training. A Priest is optional, but the Priestess is essential.
Similarly, a Priest may not Initiate without a Priestess, but a Priestess alone
is sufficient. Women are primary in Wicca for many reasons, one of which is that
the Goddess is central to our religion.
One Religion at a Time

People often ask “Can I become a Wiccan and still remain a Christian, Muslim,
practicing Jew, etc. The answer is no. The “one god” religions reject other
paths besides their own, including each other’s. “One-god” religions also do not
exalt the Female as does Wicca, and mixing two such different traditions would
water them both down. Besides, you’d have to ask how serious a person who
practiced two religions was about either one. Being Jewish is an exception,
since it is a race and culture as well as a religion. There are many Wiccan
Jews, but they practice Wicca, not Judaism.

Magick and Science

People interested in Wicca are usually curious about the magick that Wiccans can do. While magick (spelled with a “k” to distinguish from stage conjuring) is not a religion in itself, it is related to our religious beliefs. Wiccans believe
that people have many more abilities than are generally realized, and that it is
a good idea to develop them. Our magick is a way of using natural forces to
change consciousness and material conditions as an expression of our “True
Wills”. Part of becoming a Wiccan is training in our methods of psychic and
magickal development.

Because we believe that everything a person does returns to them magnified, a
Wiccan will not work a magick for harm, since they would pay too high a price.
But a helpful magick is good for both the giver and receiver! Wicca is entirely
compatible with the scientific method, and we believe all the Gods and forces we
work with to be quite natural, not supernatural at all. We do not, however, hold
with the kind of scientific dogma or pseudo religion that sees everything as
dead matter and neglects its own method by trumpeting “facts” without honest
examination of evidence.

Priestesses at Large?

Long ago the spiritual (and sometimes physical) ancestors of Wiccans were
Priestesses and Priests to the Pagan culture as well as devotees of their
Mystery. Now that a Pagan culture is rising again, some ask if today’s Wiccans
could resume that role. This seems unlikely.

Today’s Pagan culture is very diverse and more interested in exploring and
creating new forms than in building on existing traditions. A public role would
either dilute our traditions or force them on an unwilling audience. The neo-
Pagan community generally prefers “media figures” and rapid membership and
growth. This is not compatible with our slow methods of training and Initiation,
the insistence that livelihood come from work outside the Craft, or our needs
for privacy. Our religion is not accepted in the American workplace or political
system, and may never be. The most powerful Priestesses are often unknown to all but their Coveners. While all Wiccans are Pagans, all Pagans are not Wiccan, and it is best that it remain so.

Old Customs

OLD CUSTOMS

The first water drawn from any well or stream on New Year’s morning used
to be called the Flower of the Well, or the Cream of the Well. This water would bring good luck in the new year.

In Mid-January (depending on the area) the apple trees were wassailed.
The word “Wassail” comes from the Anglo-Saxon “Wehal” which means “be of
good health”. Farmers and their families went to the orchards after dark, carrying horns and a large pail of cider. Cider was poured around the roots of a chosen tree, and a piece of toast or cake, soaked in cider, was placed in the branches. A wassailing song was sung to the tree.

Girls can discover their future husband on the Eve of St Agnes by scattering a handful of barley under an apple tree saying: “Barley, barley, I sow thee; That my true love I may see; Take thy rake and follow me.” It is said that the figure of her future husband will follow and take up the seed the girl has scattered.

The cuckoo is considered a lucky bird. Money should be turned in the pocket when the first cuckoo is heard, but never look at the ground while this is done.

Morris Dancers may be seen at Whitsuntide. The Dancers stamp, kick and
jump to waken the earth spirit and bring the crops out of the ground.

On Old Midsummer Day there is a procession in the Isle of Man to Tynwald
Hill. The Governor follows the Sword of State at the head of the procession. They process through lines of guards to a platform. Here the Governor sits on a crimson velvet chair. The Chief Justice reads a list of the Acts of Parliament passed at Westminster during the year. This ceremony shows that the Isle of Man accepts English Acts as law.

On 8 July, the Burry Man walks through the streets of South Queensferry,
West Lothian, Scotland. He is covered in thistle, teazle and burrs, with a head dress made of flowers. He covers his face, and carries a staff in each hand. He talks to no-one but is said to bring good luck to houses he visits.

On the Sunday after August 12th there is a “revel” in Markhamchurch, in Cornwall. The village children chose the “Queen of the Revel” who then leads a procession through the village, riding a white horse.

The Abbots Bromley Horn Dance takes place on the first Sunday after September 4th. This is probably one of the best known of all the “Dances” in the British Isles.

General Superstitions

General Superstitions

It is unlucky to wash a baby’s head for the first twelve months.

Washing a child’s hand’s before his first birthday will take away his riches and
would live and die poor.

Nails should be bitten, not cut, for the same time, for that would make them
thieves.

Hair at no age must be cut at the waning of the moon, that would prevent it
growing luxuriantly.

Hair cut off should always be burned; it unlucky to throw shorn hair away;
otherwise, birds might make a nest of your hair, weaving tightly, so that you
would have difficulty rising on your last day.

Children’s first lost teeth are burned in order to prevent snaggle teeth from
coming in.

Coral necklaces are worn to ensure easy teething.

Coral beads are said to change color indicating whether the wearer is ill or
well.

All locks in a house are unlocked at birthing to ensure an easy delivery.

Cornishmen of the west are born with tails; they drop off when the Tamar River
is crossed.

When a boy is born under the waning moon, the next birth will be a girl, and
vice versa.

When a child is born under a waxing moon, the next birth will be of the same
sex.

A child born at the interval between the old and new moons is fated to die
young.

Babies with blue veins across their noses will not live to see twenty-one.

SUPERSTITIONS & BELIEFS

SUPERSTITIONS & BELIEFS

Superstitious beliefs and customs are very much a part of Filipino culture. We
have a whole panoply of pamahiin ranging from beliefs in supernatural beings
(spirits, engkantos, witches, talismans, amulets); beliefs connected to
marriage, conception, birth, & child rearing; and beliefs linked to death &
afterlife. Many of these beliefs are considered ridiculous and silly but many
people believe it to be symbolic. For instance many of the beliefs that could be
categorized under human actions or activities are important to the lives of
people such as sleeping, eating & gift-giving. These actions feature highly in
the imagination of our people and much symbolism has been attached to them.

ACTIONS

If you bite your tongue accidentally, someone is talking about you or thinking
of you.

It is not good to take a bath right after eating for this will cause the stomach
to enlarge.

After bathing at night, do not sleep while your hair is wet for you will become
blind or insane.

If you dream that one of your teeth is being pulled, it means death to one
member of your family.

Have a new car blessed to avoid accidents & for greater car longevity.

Boiling egg while saying the Lord’s prayer assures a soft-boiled egg. (This is
because saying the Lord’s prayer takes about 15 sec thus assuring a soft-boiled
egg).

A broken mirror given by a beloved presages a broken engagement.

In building stairs, be sure to count the steps with oro (gold), plata (silver),
and mata (death). The last step must fall on oro or plata to insure good luck to
the house dwellers.

When building a house, the door and stairs must face the East where the sun
rises to insure good luck.

Children should not be allowed to play in the afternoon for they might bump into
unseen beings. (Of course this probably came about because parents just want
their children to take naps in the afternoon.)

When you bury dead animals under fruit trees, the fruits of these trees will be
sweet.

Buying anything on New Year’s Day results in extravagance throughout the whole year.

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MARRIAGE

Clearing the table while others are still eating will cause the diners not to
ever get married.

A mole on the forehead or nose means luck in business.

A lady singing while cooking will marry a widower.

A girl sitting at the head of the table becomes a spinster.

Stepping over a person while he/she is lying down removes the person’s chances
to marry. Another variation is it will cause the person not to grow. To reverse
the curse, the person who stepped over the person lying down must retrace his
step backwards.

If the younger sister or brother gets married before the older siblings, the
older siblings will never get married.

Getting married the day before a full moon brings prosperity to your marriage.

It is considered bad luck for siblings to marry within the same year.

During the wedding ceremony, the groom must be the first to arrive at the church
and wait for the bride, but not vice versa, otherwise it is a bad omen.

It is bad luck to see the bride in her wedding gown before the wedding.

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EVERYDAY SUPERSTITIONS

Putting money directly on the family dining room table is bad luck.

When there’s a spider or any other insects (except roaches…eeew!) don’t kill
it because it could be re-incarnations of past relatives and is present to watch
over you and/or your family.

When you give someone a pair of shoes as a gift, ask the recipient to give the
you money (penny, nickel, dime, quarters, or anything higher) so that they can
say that they bought it off you. If that person doesn’t give you money, he’ll
step all over you. You will be taken advantage.

When you’re driving and a black cat runs across your path, spit out the window
to avoid bad luck.

On New Year’s Eve, jump up when the clock strikes midnight so that you will
grow.

On New Year’s Day, you should wear or have something around you that is either
linear or circular so that you will have a prolonged life.

Don’t sit on tables in a business office. Bad luck will come over the business.

SUPERSTITIONS

A WORD ABOUT SUPERSTITIONS

I guess most of us are just a tad superstitious, at least to the point where we
don’t take unnecessary chances. You know, better safe than sorry.
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There are certain superstitions that I go along with, but breaking a mirror
brings seven years bad luck ain’t one of ’em. Heck, I know a man who broke one
and he didn’t have seven years bad luck at all. He was run over by a train and
killed the day after he broke it.

Here is a list of southern superstitions I’ve heard all my life. I’m sure you
will remember a number of them:

– If you sweep dirt out of the house on Friday, the house will burn down.

– Wash your hair in the first rain in May, and it will grow faster.

– Cross your eyes and jump over a ditch at midnight, and your eyes will stay
crossed forever.

– See a cardinal, make a wish, and pinch someone to make it come true.

– Make a wish on a redbird before it flies, and your wish will come true.

– Sleep with a mirror under your pillow, and you will see your future husband.

– When a man’s second toe is longer than his big toe, he will be henpecked.

– If a bride goes to the altar with some salt in her pocket, she will always be
happy.

– When fish jump above the water, look for rain.

– Run into a cobweb, and you’ll get a letter.

– If your palm itches, you are going to get some money.

– If your nose itches, it means you are going to have company.

– Carry in your pocket a button you’ve found, and it will bring you good luck.
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– Walking on the other side of a post from a friend will bring on a quarrel,
unless you say “bread and butter.”

– Snakes will not come around a place where gourds are growing.

– It will bring much bad luck if you sleep on new, unwashed sheets.

– To become beautiful, get behind a door and eat a chicken foot.

– A woman who drops her apron will lose a friend.

– If your left foot itches, you will walk where you’re not welcome.

– Look under a bed, and you’ll never marry.

– It’s bad luck to lean a broom against a bed.

– If someone sweeps under your feet, you’ll never marry.

– If your initials spell a word, you will become rich.

– If your shoestring becomes untied, someone is talking about you.

– Shaking hands over a fence will bring bad luck.

– Those whose teeth grow wide apart will be travelers.

– Always step into a courtroom on your right foot when you have business there.

– A woman with short fingers makes a good manager.

– If you sneeze before breakfast, you’ll see your sweetheart before Saturday
night.

– If you can see the sunshine through a man’s ears, he’s a rascal and can’t be
trusted.

– Whistle in bed and you’ll cry before the next night.

– You can be sure of rough weather if the grape or pecan crop is heavy.

– It’s bad luck to climb over anybody in bed.

– It causes bad luck if you bring an old broom into a new house.

– It’s bad luck to take up ashes from the fireplace during the Christmas season.

– If a fly flies around your face continually, a stranger hopes to meet you.

– Cut your fingernails before breakfast on Monday morning, and you’ll get a
present before the week is over.

– Forget to wash a skillet and you can expect a guest for the next meal.

– When hornets nests are low, it will be a cold winter.

– The first thunder of spring wakes up the snakes and tells you that winter is
gone.

– It’s good luck for a butterfly to light on your shoulder.

– A wish made in a bed that’s never been slept in will come true.

– You can utter any untruth your heart desires as long as your fingers are
crossed.

A WITCH’S BREW FOR CLAIRVOYANCE

A WITCH’S BREW FOR CLAIRVOYANCE

Into a cauldron of boiling water, add a handful each of 3 herbs(shredded) that have long been associated with the arts of divination and prophecy.

  • laurel leaves

  • cinquefoil

  • mugwort

Cover with a lid, and boil for 13 minutes.

Lift the lid of the cauldron and deeply inhale the vapors of the bubbling brew 3 times.

Take a normal breath of air, and then once again deeply inhale the vapors 3 times.

Repeat this for 3 minutes, and if you have allowed yourself to properly enter a psychic state, you may begin to receive prophetic visions, either in the form of pictures or symbols, or perhaps in a combination of the two.

To Attract Others of Like Mind

To Attract Others of Like Mind

To surround yourself in love!

Items You Need

Orange candle

vanilla oil

needle & thread

6 sunflower seeds (soaked overnight in water to soften the outer shell)

Anoint the candle with vanilla oil and light it.  As it burns, chant

Come from here and come from there

People whom my ideals share

Come one, come now, come all to me

By Sun, Wind, Earth, and Shining Sea!

Thread the needle and string through the first sunflower seed Say:

With seed one, the spells begun

String the second seed, saying:

With seed two, my wish comes true

With the third:

With seed three, it comes to me

Fourth:

With seed four, it’s at my door

Fifth:

With seed five, it grows and thrives

And with the sixth seed:

With seed six, the spell is fixed

Knot the ends of the thread together to form a ring Rub a little vanilla oil into the center of the seed ring, and leave It by the candle until it burns out. Carry the ring with you as an attraction charm!

To Attract Customers to a Business or Visitors to a Home

To Attract Customers to a Business or Visitors to a Home

Make a fine powder out of some basil leaves and sprinkle them around the main entrance to the home or place of business. It is believed that only good and friendly people will enter, since it supposedly repels those who intend harm toward the workers of a business or the occupants of a home.