WOTC Extra – Some Ouija Board Do’s & Don’ts

WOTC Extra – Some Ouija Board Do’s & Don’ts

We have all heard many stories about the Ouija board so what do we believe? That’s for you to decide. But we figured we would give you a few pointer’s we have learned in order to help keep you safe from the Ouija board and it’s spirits during your Ouija session.These are the same thing as superstitions only people call them “Ouijastitions”.Weather you are superstitious or not you might want to take some of these precautions while using the board.Its The same thing as “It’s bad luck when a black cat walks across your path”,”Don’t walk under ladder’s”,”If you break a mirror it’s 7 years bad luck”.Only dealing with the Ouija board.

– Never use the Ouija Board when you are in an ill or weakened condition. This can lead to all kinds of trouble and makes the person more vulnerable to possession.(For more on possession…see the next page)

-Often times the spirits contacted through the board create “wins” for the user causing he or she to become more and more dependent on the board. For example, a spirit might tell the truth about a future event to gain the trust of the user. The user begins to consult the board more and more and eventually become addicted,not wanting to do anything but spend time with the spirit. This is known as “Progressive Entrapment”.

– Since there is no way of truly knowing if a spirit is good or evil it is important to keep in mind that the spirits will often use false flattery and lies to gain your confidence. Be careful.

-Always be respectful to the spirits.

-Sometimes an evil spirit will permanently inhabit a board. When this happens no other spirits will be able to communicate though that Ouija Board.

-Beware … if the planchette begins to count down through the letter of the alphabet or the numbers the spirit can escape form the board.

-If the planchette moves to the four corners of the board an evil spirit has been contacted.

-Never use the Ouija in a graveyard or a place where a terrible death has occurred. Playing in these places might cause terrible manifestations.

-Witch Boards are named such because witches once used them to summon demons.

-Avoid playing the Ouija Board alone. This increases your chances of becoming possessed by a spirit or demon.

-Ouija Boards that are not properly disposed of will return to haunt the owner.

-If you Burn the Ouija Board it will scream.

-If you place a silver coin on the board,It is said that no evil spirits can come through.

-Never leave the planchette on the board when you are not using it.

-To properly dispose of the Ouija Board break it into seven pieces,pour holy water on it and bury it.

Maybe all this is just Ouija folklore passed down something like an urban legend but it’s your choice to believe it or not…

-Ouija Boards that are not properly disposed of will rerurn to haunt the owner.

-If you Burn the Ouija Board it will sream.

-If you place a silver coin on the board,It is said that no evil spirits can come through.

-Never leave the planchette on the board when you are not using it.

-To properly dispose of the Ouija Board break it into seven peices,pour holy water on it and bury it.

Maybe all this is just Ouija folklore passed down something like an urban ledgend but it’s your choice to belive it or not..

Source:

The Best Damn Ouija Board Site Ever

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Superstitions of the Zodiac

Superstitions of the Zodiac

Learn the worst fears of every zodiac sign

Jeff Jawer   Jeff Jawer on the topics of insight, halloween, astrology

Black cats, ladders, Friday the 13th and Halloween traditionally get a bad rap among the superstitious. And of course, Astrology itself is a superstition to some people, too, isn’t it? What-ever.

Aries (March 21 – April 19)

Ever the pioneer, Aries loves to be first and hates having his or her view blocked by anyone. Sitting behind another person in a theater might be considered bad luck or, perhaps, getting caught on the slow line at the supermarket. When you see someone bolting out of the store rather than wait five minutes for a cashier, it’s probably an Aries.

Taurus (April 20 – May 20)

No one likes life’s sensual delights more than a Taurus. This sign’s dominant superstition involves the need to have ice cream in the freezer at all times. A lack of chocolate might be particularly terrifying, motivating even the most laid-back Bull to get off the couch, rush out of the house and buy some premium creamy dessert to avoid catastrophe.

Gemini (May 21 – June 20)

Many chatty Geminis are convinced that if they don’t use up all their cell phone minutes every month, they will be struck with terribly bad luck. Rollover plans are definitely a no-no as they can encourage a lax attitude when it comes to calling friends, family members and new acquaintances to discuss last night’s episode of Grey’s Anatomy.

Cancer (June 21 – July 22)

Cancers are the great collectors of the zodiac. They keep objects from childhood that most people would have tossed decades earlier. It’s bad luck, a good number of them might presume, to let go of your junior high school sweatshirt even though it’s full of holes and the building was torn down way back in 1975.

Leo (July 23 – Aug. 22)

Leos love to be noticed … and remembered … and revered. It’s not only considered bad form to forget one’s name, even though you met them for two minutes at a convention of 10,000 people, but considered to be very bad luck for the Leo. Most Lions do whatever it takes to burn their name in your brain to avoid this danger.

Virgo (Aug. 23 – Sept. 22)

Virgos are specialists in superstition, although they usually claim that they’re just being practical. An interruption in their carefully calibrated routine can ruin a day. If items aren’t put away in exactly the right place or if their hair or clothes aren’t perfect, this is no mere inconvenience, it can turn the most logical Virgo into an illogical mess.

Libra (Sept. 23 – Oct. 22)

Librans require peace and harmony and will sometimes short-change themselves (especially in relationships) to keep others happy. Many of them are convinced that if they get even the tiniest extra bit of love, attention, money, food or fun than their partner that they are doomed and will be punished severely for three lifetimes.

Scorpio (Oct. 23 – Nov. 21)

Scorpios are the sheriffs of superstition — the marshals of metaphysics — and they know that everything counts and will either work for you or against you. The shadow of a flying bird seen against a house, driving behind a 1983 Buick convertible or even catching the same Will and Grace rerun on two different channels can all be dangerous.

Sagittarius (Nov. 22 – Dec. 21)

Sagittarians love to take risks, but they might be the most superstitious sign of all. They often have a string of them, like no petting of dogs on big days, no wearing green on weekends, or never checking luggage on trips to Hawaii. Of course, stuffing ginormous carry-on bags is considered perfectly normal and good luck, too.

Capricorn (Dec. 22 – Jan. 19)

Capricorns don’t have time for the foolishness of superstitions. In fact, they think it’s bad luck to be with a superstitious person and will do their best to avoid them. Unhappily for them, most of them marry Pisces, who turn their homes into something that looks like a cross between St. Peter’s Cathedral and a Buddhist temple.

Aquarius (Jan. 20 – Feb. 18)

Aquarians think that following rules is bad luck. If they’re in the “10 item or less” line with nine items, they’ll seek out two more things and return with 11 things. It’s clear that filing income taxes, going to the dentist more than once a year or carrying ID when driving is only going to get them into some serious trouble.

Pisces (Feb. 19 – March 20)

Pisces are superstitious about rainy days … and sunny ones, about stepping on cracks in the sidewalk or stepping between them. Consistency is the biggest danger of all, so changing their superstitions according to the phases of the Moon, local barometric pressure or the PH of their bathroom water is common.

SUPERSTITIONS & BELIEFS

SUPERSTITIONS & BELIEFS

Superstitious beliefs and customs are very much a part of Filipino culture. We
have a whole panoply of pamahiin ranging from beliefs in supernatural beings
(spirits, engkantos, witches, talismans, amulets); beliefs connected to
marriage, conception, birth, & child rearing; and beliefs linked to death &
afterlife. Many of these beliefs are considered ridiculous and silly but many
people believe it to be symbolic. For instance many of the beliefs that could be
categorized under human actions or activities are important to the lives of
people such as sleeping, eating & gift-giving. These actions feature highly in
the imagination of our people and much symbolism has been attached to them.

ACTIONS

If you bite your tongue accidentally, someone is talking about you or thinking
of you.

It is not good to take a bath right after eating for this will cause the stomach
to enlarge.

After bathing at night, do not sleep while your hair is wet for you will become
blind or insane.

If you dream that one of your teeth is being pulled, it means death to one
member of your family.

Have a new car blessed to avoid accidents & for greater car longevity.

Boiling egg while saying the Lord’s prayer assures a soft-boiled egg. (This is
because saying the Lord’s prayer takes about 15 sec thus assuring a soft-boiled
egg).

A broken mirror given by a beloved presages a broken engagement.

In building stairs, be sure to count the steps with oro (gold), plata (silver),
and mata (death). The last step must fall on oro or plata to insure good luck to
the house dwellers.

When building a house, the door and stairs must face the East where the sun
rises to insure good luck.

Children should not be allowed to play in the afternoon for they might bump into
unseen beings. (Of course this probably came about because parents just want
their children to take naps in the afternoon.)

When you bury dead animals under fruit trees, the fruits of these trees will be
sweet.

Buying anything on New Year’s Day results in extravagance throughout the whole year.

——————————————————————————–

MARRIAGE

Clearing the table while others are still eating will cause the diners not to
ever get married.

A mole on the forehead or nose means luck in business.

A lady singing while cooking will marry a widower.

A girl sitting at the head of the table becomes a spinster.

Stepping over a person while he/she is lying down removes the person’s chances
to marry. Another variation is it will cause the person not to grow. To reverse
the curse, the person who stepped over the person lying down must retrace his
step backwards.

If the younger sister or brother gets married before the older siblings, the
older siblings will never get married.

Getting married the day before a full moon brings prosperity to your marriage.

It is considered bad luck for siblings to marry within the same year.

During the wedding ceremony, the groom must be the first to arrive at the church
and wait for the bride, but not vice versa, otherwise it is a bad omen.

It is bad luck to see the bride in her wedding gown before the wedding.

——————————————————————————–

EVERYDAY SUPERSTITIONS

Putting money directly on the family dining room table is bad luck.

When there’s a spider or any other insects (except roaches…eeew!) don’t kill
it because it could be re-incarnations of past relatives and is present to watch
over you and/or your family.

When you give someone a pair of shoes as a gift, ask the recipient to give the
you money (penny, nickel, dime, quarters, or anything higher) so that they can
say that they bought it off you. If that person doesn’t give you money, he’ll
step all over you. You will be taken advantage.

When you’re driving and a black cat runs across your path, spit out the window
to avoid bad luck.

On New Year’s Eve, jump up when the clock strikes midnight so that you will
grow.

On New Year’s Day, you should wear or have something around you that is either
linear or circular so that you will have a prolonged life.

Don’t sit on tables in a business office. Bad luck will come over the business.

SUPERSTITIONS

A WORD ABOUT SUPERSTITIONS

I guess most of us are just a tad superstitious, at least to the point where we
don’t take unnecessary chances. You know, better safe than sorry.
|
There are certain superstitions that I go along with, but breaking a mirror
brings seven years bad luck ain’t one of ’em. Heck, I know a man who broke one
and he didn’t have seven years bad luck at all. He was run over by a train and
killed the day after he broke it.

Here is a list of southern superstitions I’ve heard all my life. I’m sure you
will remember a number of them:

– If you sweep dirt out of the house on Friday, the house will burn down.

– Wash your hair in the first rain in May, and it will grow faster.

– Cross your eyes and jump over a ditch at midnight, and your eyes will stay
crossed forever.

– See a cardinal, make a wish, and pinch someone to make it come true.

– Make a wish on a redbird before it flies, and your wish will come true.

– Sleep with a mirror under your pillow, and you will see your future husband.

– When a man’s second toe is longer than his big toe, he will be henpecked.

– If a bride goes to the altar with some salt in her pocket, she will always be
happy.

– When fish jump above the water, look for rain.

– Run into a cobweb, and you’ll get a letter.

– If your palm itches, you are going to get some money.

– If your nose itches, it means you are going to have company.

– Carry in your pocket a button you’ve found, and it will bring you good luck.
|
– Walking on the other side of a post from a friend will bring on a quarrel,
unless you say “bread and butter.”

– Snakes will not come around a place where gourds are growing.

– It will bring much bad luck if you sleep on new, unwashed sheets.

– To become beautiful, get behind a door and eat a chicken foot.

– A woman who drops her apron will lose a friend.

– If your left foot itches, you will walk where you’re not welcome.

– Look under a bed, and you’ll never marry.

– It’s bad luck to lean a broom against a bed.

– If someone sweeps under your feet, you’ll never marry.

– If your initials spell a word, you will become rich.

– If your shoestring becomes untied, someone is talking about you.

– Shaking hands over a fence will bring bad luck.

– Those whose teeth grow wide apart will be travelers.

– Always step into a courtroom on your right foot when you have business there.

– A woman with short fingers makes a good manager.

– If you sneeze before breakfast, you’ll see your sweetheart before Saturday
night.

– If you can see the sunshine through a man’s ears, he’s a rascal and can’t be
trusted.

– Whistle in bed and you’ll cry before the next night.

– You can be sure of rough weather if the grape or pecan crop is heavy.

– It’s bad luck to climb over anybody in bed.

– It causes bad luck if you bring an old broom into a new house.

– It’s bad luck to take up ashes from the fireplace during the Christmas season.

– If a fly flies around your face continually, a stranger hopes to meet you.

– Cut your fingernails before breakfast on Monday morning, and you’ll get a
present before the week is over.

– Forget to wash a skillet and you can expect a guest for the next meal.

– When hornets nests are low, it will be a cold winter.

– The first thunder of spring wakes up the snakes and tells you that winter is
gone.

– It’s good luck for a butterfly to light on your shoulder.

– A wish made in a bed that’s never been slept in will come true.

– You can utter any untruth your heart desires as long as your fingers are
crossed.

Working With The Days of the Week – Sunday

Sunday Is Ruled By The Sun

Archangel: Michael

Candle colour: Gold

Incenses: Frankincense or orange

Crystals: Amber of clear quartz

Use Sundays for spells for new beginnings, for worldly success, to achieve ambitions and to reverse bad luck, especially financial and for health.

Where possible, use an open space in sunlight for sun spells, such as a sunny beach or shimmering plain.

5 Superstitions and Why They Exist

5 Superstitions and Why They Exist

By Allison Ford, DivineCaroline

I was at work a few years ago when a coworker walking by my desk let out a  terrified squeal. “Your purse is on the floor! Don’t you know that’s bad luck?”  Apparently, she was referring to a superstition which holds that to place your  purse or wallet on the floor is to invite money troubles. I had never heard of  this old wives’ tale and didn’t lend it much credibility, but on my way home, I  did notice my lifelong habit of avoiding sidewalk cracks, surely a leftover from  a youthful urge to protect my mother’s spinal health.

Superstitions ascribe supernatural origins to things that  humans don’t understand, and they occur across the world. Early humans had a lot  that they didn’t understand, but modern people are much more enlightened.  Superstitions about bad luck feel like the kind of things we tell gullible  children, so why do I still see people knocking on wood, throwing salt over  their shoulders, and refusing to walk under ladders? Exactly where do these  strange superstitions come from, and do any have even the tiniest basis in  reality?

Don’t Spill the Salt! Salt is one of our most ancient and versatile foodstuffs,  used for preserving food as well as flavoring it. For most of history, it was  incredibly valuable, too, sometimes even used as currency. Spilling such a  precious commodity was akin to dumping the thirty-year-old Scotch down the  drain. For anyone who was careless enough to waste salt, throwing a pinch over  the left shoulder was said to keep the devil away, since he was sure to be  following you after such a grievous offense.

Walking Under Ladders Brings Bad  Luck This superstition has its roots in religion. Some Christians  believe that any object with three points—like a ladder leaning against a  house—represents the Trinity of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Early  Christians believed that to destroy or subvert a three-pointed object (like by  walking through it) one was expressing disbelief in the Trinity, and would  therefore probably go to Hell. As religious conviction softened, the promise of  eternal damnation was relaxed to merely the threat of bad luck. I admit to  following the rule against walking under ladders, but for a more practical  purpose—I don’t care for things dropping on my head, as is wont to happen when  people are working above.

Un-Lucky Number Thirteen Plenty of otherwise rational  people are loath to schedule important events on the thirteenth of the month,  and many buildings and towns don’t even include a thirteenth floor or thirteenth  street, because so many people believe the number to be cursed. The origins of  this superstition are factually tenuous, and there are many theories about how  it came about. Christian theology teaches that Judas was the thirteenth guest at  the Last Supper, making him unlucky. Norse mythology states that the god Loki,  who was the thirteenth guest at a banquet, killed the hero, Balder. Not to  mention the fact that several serial killers have thirteen letters in their  name, like Charles Manson or Jeffrey Dahmer. Fear of the number thirteen even  has its own name, triskaidekaphobia, and many sufferers refuse to be the  thirteenth guest at a party, or to sit in row thirteen on an airplane for fear  that some terrible fate will befall them. In reality, there’s no credible  evidence to suggest anything sinister about any particular number, and in some  cultures, the number thirteen is actually considered quite lucky.

Shakespeare’s “Scottish Play” Many  actors refuse to say the name Macbeth, especially when they’re inside a theater.  The play is said to be cursed, and is usually referred to as simply, “The  Scottish Play.” Some accounts say that productions of Macbeth have been plagued  by an unusually high number of accidents, injuries, and deaths on- and offstage,  perhaps because the play itself is unusually ripe with fights, weapons, battles,  and opportunities for things to go wrong. Since the play features three witches,  some origin stories for the superstition say that the lines uttered by the  witches are real curses, that real witches were offended by the play and cursed  it, or that Shakespeare’s original prop master stole items from a real witches’  coven. The most likely explanation is that Macbeth, being one of the English  language’s most enduring pieces of drama, is often put on by theaters trying to  stave off bankruptcy, and the play eventually got a reputation as foreshadowing  a theater’s demise.

Sacred Sneezes
All cultures offer some sort of blessing  after a person sneezes. While the origins of the benedictions are muddled,  it seems certain that primitive people thought that a person’s soul could leave  the body through the nose, and asking for God’s protection was a way to prevent  its escape. Romans, however, believed that sneezing expelled demons, and  witnesses to a sneeze offered congratulations and support. During the sixth  century, there was a plague raging, and the populace thought that sneezing was a  symptom of impending death. Pope Gregory pronounced that the official response  to a sneeze would be “God bless you,” which was thought to invoke divine  protection for both the sneezer and the sneezed-upon.

Magical Thinking

Magical Thinking

Author: Levi

Many times when people find the Pagan community we hear that children display many unique abilities, unlike their adult counterparts who have been conditioned to our modern mundane world. How do children view the world of seeming superstition and magick? What can we learn from this and apply to our lives as modern Pagans? It is with the tools of skeptical thinking, psychology and a dash of good old fashioned pondering that I would like to explore with you these topics.

First of all children take things for face value; while observing, they soak in every comprehensible detail unknowingly. Yet their actions are based more on what they have been instructed to do, not what they observe independently. If you were to throw a notion or better a devout law into their thought process, and couple that with the respect they feel for the notion-dropper, that child is capable of believing in any possible thing. Think about Hansel and Gretel, Harry Potter, God, the bogeyman, any of the archetypal “make-believe” characters, and you know what I mean. Their level of belief in the characters, and/or magickal thinking, depends greatly on which level of cognitive development the child currently maintains. Aside from that, social learning plays an important role because parents are the children’s first and foremost teachers and the sheer scope of their job is extensive. “Therefore if children are to learn to walk, to speak, and to take care of themselves, adults cannot simply wait for a time driven process of cognitive development to unfold, neither can they wait until a child exhibits desirable behaviors by chance, and then lavishly reinforce the lucky episode.” (Vyse pg. 157) As the years pass from pre-operational thinking, ages 2-7, to concrete operational thinking, ages 7-11, so declines their susceptibility to superstitious beliefs and irrational concepts of reality. Skepticism is an adult characteristic and is acquired, if at all, with age. Which brings us to formal operational thinking, over 11 years of age, which starts to incorporate logical thinking over the more fiction-based, directly-handed-down method of learning. The pre-adolescent begins to put together abstract thoughts and construct its own views on its reality, and other realities. After the pre-adolescent stage the child therefore begins to seemingly take on a more what we would term adult view of reality and reason. Though conformity can be seen as the destroyer of intellectual thinking, it nonetheless steps in around this age. It works as your individual observations weigh less as your understanding of social interaction and acceptance begin to affect more and more of your decisions.

What exactly does all this mean, you may ask. Well all of these facts show that in our increasingly modern world we are slowly conditioning our children to no longer think with imagination and creativity. Nevertheless a starling array of what are termed as old wives tales, warnings and magickal thought still survive till today and are reflections of many preoccupations and/or human fears that have been passed on over time. But it is my thought that we need not view these things in such a light, as it would be much wiser to view them as a part of oral tradition to pass on. It is also interesting to note as a parallel that sometimes science has demonstrated that certain beliefs relating to various plants and foods that hold magical powers do in fact have a basis in reality and have been proven to work. On the other hand people still avoid walking under ladders and knock on wood and cross their fingers in order to guard there luck. With this in mind, of all things this teaches us that it is not only important to instill our traditions into our youth if they are to survive, but to instill these traditions as a way of love, if the world and intelligent humanity is to survive.

My personal experience with the topic of traditions could be viewed I guess in part as a long legacy if you will, which everyone has, if a little thought has been put into it. First off I come from an Irish/Sicilian descent; both cultures have been steeped in magickal and superstitious thinking for millennia. Ever since I was a small child I remember a figure or wall plaque of the triskele in my home. The triskele is a symbol of Medusa surrounded by three legs representing the three magickal nymphs. In essence the story of this symbol dates back to the times and stories of the goddess Diana within ancient Italy. Still today many Sicilian people have this symbol within there home to guard the home from negativity and yes today here in my home, hanging over the front door, is a triskele symbol. Somehow throughout my childhood I have taken on this simple traditional superstition, accepted it and have woven it into the workings of my own life. But this is typically how family traditions or what may be termed superstitions seem to work.

Thrown into this mix I was born and raised in Kansas. Now the Midwest doesn’t seem like it is much of a magical place, but actually it is a place filled with local traditions and legends, mostly belonging to the Native Americans that once lived there and other people known as God fearing Christians! In addition to this I can remember as a child being told by my grandmother to stay close to the house because of the Gypsies who at one time were known to be in the area. But moreover she taught that they would kidnap me and never let me come home. Actually and generally these Gypsies were immigrants that would travel through the area from time to time, but were long gone before my days on the prairie. What I do know now is that this was her way of protecting and keeping me close to home as was also her way of keeping me in bed at night with tales of the bogeyman and his nightly rampaging of the land in search of children! “But don’t worry; he might let you lose when the sun comes, if you’re lucky, ” she would always say, ever so wisely.

Over the years as I grew up and have (unfortunately) gone far beyond my stages of development I have later learned that these fictional creatures have served as a tool for elders throughout time as means of safeguarding children. Even though I still may think of Mr. Bogeyman from time to time, and maybe I’ll pass that one on. I believe that because of these experiences that I have had in the past, my upbringing and the fact that I am the product of two old hippies, this has led me to where I am today. It has led me to my view upon the world as a much more magical place than what the average may think. Witchcraft and the study thereof, is an earth-based religion passed on from our Pagan ancestors that looks to the divine within the aspects of nature, therefore working and following closely with the waxing and waning seasons of the year. It is heavily involved with ecology and moral issues in addition to environmental issues. Witchcraft also teaches us to be open-minded and at the same time to think very wisely of the world, and the issues within it. It also teaches you to value the people around you and your future of this world, remembering not to take everything for granted or at face value, thereby devaluing one’s own self and worth.

It is suggested these traditions are that of false superstitious behavior and are abnormal in nature. Probably no other aspect of psychological behavior is more challenging to understand than that of the abnormal because it is thought of as kind of working hand-in-hand with mental disorders. In everyday life, people often talk about “mental illness, ” a term which echoes of medical asylums and twisted and cruel mental health practitioners, so in turn this view has given a negative view or stigmatism upon the subject of abnormal behavior. In hand this is placing a negative view upon traditions, which may be viewed as abnormal, because they do not fit into the mainstream. The reality is that public understanding of true abnormal behavior is fairly limited and right now we still don’t have all the answers when it comes to understanding and treating disorders. But is abnormal behavior by itself really a disorder? When you think about the word itself all abnormal behavior really is the fact that when someone may act in a manner that does not fit society’s expected view of normal behavior, they are viewed as abnormal. Does the behavior make them mentally ill? I think not, in fact to me this sounds a little reminiscent of what we now term as The Burning Times. Truer things to consider or to ask when deciding if someone is abnormal are: Is this person suffering? Is her or she seemingly maladaptive? Are they irrational or unpredictable? Or are they violating morals or society’s standards? The thought is that when a person displays a couple or more of these conditions then we could label one as abnormal or as having a mental condition with some confidence. I also think this is a good approach and also say as long as the person is not harming him or her self, others, or the surrounding area then there may really not be a problem at all. Maybe the person is very creative or there could be a long list of other possibilities that do not fit under the heading mental illness. When real thought is put into it maybe the real problem lies in the observer of this “abnormal behavior.” It may in fact be touching on some of observer’s own personal fear, bias and or issues on an unspoken or hidden level. Or simply it may be a behavior that the observer has never been exposed to before.

This also works within the realm of Magickal traditions. Because of the mainstream views upon Magickal traditions as irrational in nature it is thereby simple to label someone as irrational. This type of labeling can be very tricky and or harmful, as history has shown us. But again we tend to view irrational behavior within the context of the extreme, which leads us back to that old abnormal behavior. Are my beliefs or traditions abnormal and/or irrational compared to that of a Christian or a Jewish person or are theirs compared to mine? I think not, because as we can see every faith and/or culture around the world has its own set of values, traditions, and thoughts on belief, magick and superstition. It’s how we think that is really important because when we think in a linear way opposed to a more creative way we tend to push our personal views and/or perspectives upon others and in the long run can lead to conflict, maybe even harm. We see these downfalls and issues working everyday within the media alone.

My closing thought on growing up learning and passing on magickal traditions and in effect living one’s life with the belief in these ways is not something to be shunned. The point is no matter how odd society would like to view us and our magical ways of thinking or what labels they would like to put upon the subject, in actuality under some circumstances it can prove to be very rational, therapeutic and/or a combination of the two. Our beliefs in Magick as well as our traditions will continue to flourish as a natural human expression around the globe even in the most technologically advanced societies, and probably as long as there are humans to utilize these tools… The fact is, is it above irrational to bring comfort to the modern human condition? Which the magickal traditions can and do provide. With this in mind learn once again to think with the imagination of a child and create new beautiful realities for our future to come.

Footnotes:
Vyse A. Stuart (Oxford university Press 1997) Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition
Pickering, David (Cassell 1995) Dictionary of Superstitions

 

Ah, Heck Yeah, It’s Friday, Friday, Friday! TGIF!

Days Of The Week Comments

The following is taken from an article on Beliefnet.com, “13 Ways To Improve Your Luck.” This one struck me in particular because most of these superstitions or “ways to change your luck,” comes from our Religion. This is the last article of 13, you are to do this when all else fails. Take a look!

And When All Else Fails…

Get yourself a good luck charm; I highly recommend authentic four-leaf clover. Or… Step in a shadow! Or… Place sugar in your  cup before the teabag. And last, but finally not least, for those of you who are  willing to take risks and go out on a limb, wear your clothing inside-out. All  these superstitions are guaranteed to improve your luck – as well as receive  attention and some stares from onlookers, for sure!

Makes you wonder, how our Religion can be “so wrong,” since everyone and their brother has stolen from it since the beginning of time. Hmm….

Magickal Graphics

Why Friday the 13th Is Unlucky

Why Friday the 13th Is Unlucky

Paraskevidekatriaphobia: Friday the 13th Origins, History, and Folklore

By David Emery, About.com Guide

I HAVE before me the abstract of a 1993 study published in the British Medical Journal provocatively titled “Is Friday the 13th Bad for Your Health?”

With the aim of mapping “the relation between health, behaviour, and superstition surrounding Friday 13th in the United Kingdom,” its authors compared the ratio of traffic volume to the number of automobile accidents on two different days, Friday the 6th and Friday the 13th, over a period of years.

Incredibly, they found that in the region sampled, while consistently fewer people chose to drive their cars on Friday the 13th, the number of hospital admissions due to vehicular accidents was significantly higher than on “normal” Fridays. Their conclusion:

“Friday 13th is unlucky for some. The risk of hospital admission as a result of a transport accident may be increased by as much as 52 percent. Staying at home is recommended.”

Paraskevidekatriaphobics — people afflicted with a morbid, irrational fear of Friday the 13th — will be pricking up their ears about now, buoyed by seeming evidence that the source of their unholy terror might not be so irrational after all. It’s unwise to take solace in a single scientific study, however, especially one so peculiar. I suspect these statistics have more to teach us about human psychology than the ill-fatedness of any particular date on the calendar.

Friday the 13th, ‘the most widespread superstition’

The sixth day of the week and the number 13 both have foreboding reputations said to date from ancient times. It seems their inevitable conjunction from one to three times a year (there will be three such occurrences in 2012, exactly 13 weeks apart) portends more misfortune than some credulous minds can bear. According to some sources it’s the most widespread superstition in the United States today. Some people refuse to go to work on Friday the 13th; some won’t eat in restaurants; many wouldn’t think of setting a wedding on the date.

How many Americans at the beginning of the 21st century suffer from this condition? According to Dr. Donald Dossey, a psychotherapist specializing in the treatment of phobias (and coiner of the term paraskevidekatriaphobia, also spelled paraskavedekatriaphobia), the figure may be as high as 21 million. If he’s right, no fewer than eight percent of Americans remain in the grips of a very old superstition.

Exactly how old is difficult to say, because determining the origins of superstitions is an inexact science, at best. In fact, it’s mostly guesswork.