Celebrating Legends, Folklore, & Spirituality 365 Days A Year for Jan. 18th – Festival of Perth

Wiccan
January 18th

Festival of Perth

In Australia this day was dedicated to the Aborigine Mother Goddess Nungeena. According to her legend, evil spirits destroyed the earth with insects. Nugeena then created the most beautiful birds of all: lyre birds. These magnificent creatures in turn made other birds, who assisted with the work of clearing away the insects and restoring the world to its original beauty.

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Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days A Year for January 16th – Concordia

Fantasy gothic Blingee

January 16

Concordia

To the ancient Romans, the Goddess Concordia was the personification of concord (an agreement between members of the state or between members of groups within a guild) and sometimes associated with the Greek Goddess Homonoia—the incarnation of harmony.

On this day considered to be the center-post of the first month of the new year, Concordia was petitioned to help with the formation of favorable partnerships with business as well as with love and friendship.

Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days a Year for January 15th – Hound Day

princess of the dragons and bats

January 15th

Hound Day

According to The Perpetual Almanack of Folklore by Charles Kightly, from the Markham County Contentments (1615), this day was reserved for taking care of one’s hounds. It seems that when the hounds were done with the hunt, one was to immediately wash the animals’ feet in hot butter and beer, beef broth, or a brew of mallows and nettles. Once properly cleansed, the hounds were to be allowed to rest before the fire for several hours. When the hounds were rested and refreshed, they would be rousted and turned out to find their own housing.

Celebrating Legends, Folklore and Spirituality 365 Days a Year for January 7 – Saint Distaff’s Day

goth fantasy woman
January 7

Saint Distaff’s Day

In southern England, Saint Distaff’s Day was when work began again after the Christmas holiday. Saint Distaff’s Day was not a saint’s day at all, but rather a tongue-in-check commemoration of the day on which women returned to their distaffs of unspun wool.

Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days a Year for January 4th – Sacrifice to the 7 Stars

Queen Of The Dragons

Sacrifice to the 7 Stars

The ancient Greeks set this day aside to honor Callisto, the moon Goddess who was loved by Zeus. Callisto bore Zeus a son, Arcas, and was then changed into a bear either by Zeus, wishing to hide her, or by Hera herself. As a bear she was shot by Artemis in the forest, who then placed her among the stars as the She Bear connected with the Ursa Major constellation.

In Greek Callisto was also called Helice, which means both “that which turns” and “Willow branch”-a reminder that the willow was the sacred tree favored by Helice and Callisto.

Celebrating 365 Days of Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for Saturday, December 12 – Sada, Tonantzin, Our Lady of Guadalupe

December 12

Sada, Tonantzin, Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Annually on this day in Iran, huge bonfires are ignited as the sun sets to exemplify how the power of light can overcome the power of darkness. As the fires burn, the evil influences that linger among the shadows of darkness are dispelled, thus allowing people to overcome obstacles and reach their fullest potential in the seasons to come.

It was on the hill of Tepeyac, just north of Mexico City, in 1531, that an Indian named Juan Diego saw an apparition he believed to be the Virgin Mary. The vision instructed him to have a church built on the spot, which had formerly been the cult-site of the Aztec Mother Goddess Tonantzin. At the time, the bishop disbelieved him, until the Virgin appeared for a third time and miraculously produced roses that Juan Diego presented to the bishop. As he did, the portrait of the Virgin appeared on Juan’s cloak. The shrine was built and is still a famous place of pilgrimage.

 

Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days a Year for Nov. 19th – Night-Fowling, Makahiki

unicorns and fairy 2

November 19th

Night-Fowling, Makahiki

 

According to the Perpetual Almanack of Folklore and Markham Hunger’s Prevention 1621, this is the best time for night-fowling. The weather should be mild and the moon full. One is to then take a small bell with a melodic sound, a net, and a bundle of straw into some stubble field. The net is then to be laid upon the ground close to the bushes. The bell is then tolled to awaken the fowl lingering nearby. A fire is then started with the straw to frighten the awakened birds out of the bushes and into the net.

Makahiki is the beginning of the Hawaiian harvest season when the Pleiades become visible in the night sky. According to Greek legend, the Pleiades were the seven daughters of Atlas and the Oceanid Pleione; sisters of Hyades. Zeus placed them in the heavens to help them escape the amorous inclinations of Orion, who had fallen in love with them.

 

Celebrating 365 Days of Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for November 9th – Loy Krathog, Lord Mayor’s Day

creas pour defi celticNovember 9th

 

Loy Krathog, Lord Mayor’s Day

 

Loy Krathog is the traditional wishing festival of Thailand. On this day, small boats are fashioned from banana peels and lotus leaves. When the sun sets, people take their boats to the shore, where they fill them with offerings of incense and gardenia petals. A white candle is then placed in the boat along with a wish. The boats are then set adrift on the water. It is believed that if the candle in the boat stays lit until its owner can no longer see, then the wish will be granted.

After the calendar reform of 1752 the Lord Mayor’s Day was moved from October 28 to November 9. It is on this day that “Mock Mayors” are elected in many of the poorer English towns. The elections are designed to poke good-natured fun at some of the more prestigious municipalities and their sometimes times pompous politicians. Of course, the more offensive the candidate is, the more joy in having him take the podium, whereupon a cabbage stalk is presented to him to serve as hiis mayoral mace. The festivities are usually followed by somewhat raucous behavior and of course the usual drinking and feasting.

 

365 Days of Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for October 26th – Ludi Victoriae Sullanae

Wiccan Magic

October 26th

Ludi Victoriae Sullanae

The Ludi Victoriae Sullanae were the games held on October 26 to honor the Goddess Victoria. This festival was established in 81 B.C. to celebrate Sulla’s victory over a large army of Sammites at the Porta Collina in Rome.

Victoria was the Goddess of victory, and her temple was on the Palatine Hill in Rome. She was the equivalent of the Greek Goddess Nike and was pictured with wings. Victoria was an important Goddess to the Romans, and she appears regularly on coinage from the late third century B.C. Victoria came to be regarded as the guardian of the empire, and her altar became a symbol of Paganism.

 

WOTC Extra – Animal Symbolism and Their Magic

The Magic of Animals


In many modern Pagan traditions, animal symbolism — and even actual animals — are incorporated into magical belief and practice. Let’s look at some of the ways people have welcomed animals into their magical practice throughout the ages, as well as specific animals and their folklore and legends.

1. Power Animals, Totem Animals and Spirit Animals
The use of a totem animal is not part of traditional Wiccan practice. However, as Wicca and other modern Pagan practices evolve and blend together, many people who follow non-mainstream spiritual paths find themselves working with a mix of many different belief systems. A power animal is a spiritual guardian that some people connect with. However, much like other spiritual entities, there’s no rule or guideline that says you must have one.

2. Animal Familiars
In some traditions of modern Paganism, the concept of an animal familiar is incorporated into practice. Today, a familiar is often defined as an animal with whom we have a magical connection, but in truth, the concept is a bit more complex than this.

3. Using Animal Parts in Ritual
Some Pagans use animal parts in ritual. While this may seem a bit unsavory to some folks, it’s really not that uncommon. If your tradition doesn’t forbid the use of animal parts, and the parts are gathered humanely and ethically, then there’s no reason you can’t use them. Let’s look at some of the different parts you might want to use. Let’s talk about some of the different animal parts you might choose to incorporate into magical practice, and why you may decide to use them.

4. Serpent Magic
While a lot of people are afraid of snakes, it’s important to remember that in many cultures, serpent mythology is strongly tied to the cycle of life, death and rebirth. Did you know that in the Ozarks, there is a connection between snakes and babies? Or that in Scotland, a snake emerging from its hole signified the beginning of Spring?

5. Ravens and Crows
The crow and raven appear in folklore going back to early times. Sometimes, they’re seen as harbingers of doom, but more often than not, they are messengers — what are they trying to tell us?

6. Owl Magic
Owls appear in legends and myths going back to the ancient Greeks, who knew the wise old owl was the symbol of their goddess Athena. However, owls are often associated with prophecy and bad tidings. Read about some of the ways different cultures viewed owls in folklore and magic.

7. Black Cats
Every year at Halloween, local news channels warn us to keep black cats inside just in case the local hooligans decide to get up to some nasty hijinks. But where did the fear of these beautiful animals come from? Anyone who lives with a cat knows how fortunate they are to have a cat in their life — so why are they considered unlucky?

8. Spider Folklore
Depending on where you live, you probably see spiders starting to emerge from their hiding spots at some point in the summer. By fall, they tend to be fairly active because they’re seeking warmth – which is why you may find yourself suddenly face to face with an eight-legged visitor some night when you get up to use the bathroom. Don’t panic, though – most spiders are harmless, and people have learned to co-exist with them for thousands of years. Nearly all cultures have some sort of spider mythology, and folktales about these crawly creatures abound!

9. Rabbit Magic
Spring equinox is a time for fertility and sowing seeds, and so nature’s fertility goes a little crazy. The rabbit — for good reason — is often associated with fertility magic and sexual energy. Spring is a great time to focus on some of that rambctious energy — let’s look at how rabbit symbolism can be incorporated into magical workings.

10. Wolf Legends and Folklore
The wolf is associated with many different aspects throughout the ages. Often seen as terrifying, there are plenty of tales in which the wolf is shown as compassionate and nurturing. Let’s look at some of the many wolf stories that have appeared around the world.

11. Bee Magic and Lore
When spring rolls around, you’ll see bees buzzing around your garden, partaking of the rich pollen in your flowers and herbs. The plants are in full bloom at this time of the spring, and the bees take full advantage, buzzing back and forth, carrying pollen from one blossom to another. In addition to providing us with honey and wax, bees are known to have magical properties, and they feature extensively in folklore from many different cultures. These are just a few of the legends about bees.

12. The Magic of the Horse
Over the course of time, many animals have developed a great deal of magical symbolism. The horse in particular has been found in folklore and legend in a variety of cultures – from the horse gods of the Celtic lands to the pale horse found in Biblical prophecy, the horse features prominently in many myths and legends. How can you capture the magical energy of horses, and incorporate it into your magical workings?

13. Dog Legends and Folklore
For thousands of years, man has found a companion in the dog. As time has passed, and both species have evolved, the dog has found his role in the myth and folklore of many cultures the world over. While the modern Pagan community tends to, as a whole, be drawn towards the aloof and noble cat, it’s important that we do not overlook the magical nature of dogs. Although they are typically associated with death in European legends, they are also symbolic of loyalty and the bonds of friendship.

14. Frog Magic and Superstition
Frogs and toads feature prominently in magical folklore in many societies. These amphibious critters are known for a variety of magical properties, from their ability to help predict the weather, to curing warts to bringing good luck. Let’s look at some of the best known superstitions, omens and folklore surrounding frogs and toads.

15. Cat Magic
Ever have the privilege of living with a cat? If you have, you know that they have a certain degree of unique magical energy. It’s not just our modern domesticated felines, though – people have seen cats as magical creatures for a long time. Let’s look at some of the magic, legends and folklore associated with cats throughout the ages.

16. Tortoise and Turtle Legends and Lore
The turtle and tortoise appear in a number of cultures’ myths and legends, and are often associated with longevity and stability, as well as numerous creation myths. Let’s look at some tortoise and turtle folklore, and see how we can incorporate the turtle into magic.

17. Legends of the Bear
Bears might be frightening, but in many cultures, they have magical and symbolic connotations. Let’s take a look at the folklore of the bear, and how you can incorporate it into magic.

 

 

Source:

By Patti Wigington
Paganism/Wicca Expert
Article Found On & Owned By About.com