Celebrating 365 Days of Legends, Folklore & Spirituality for Saturday, December 12 – Sada, Tonantzin, Our Lady of Guadalupe

December 12

Sada, Tonantzin, Our Lady of Guadalupe

 

Annually on this day in Iran, huge bonfires are ignited as the sun sets to exemplify how the power of light can overcome the power of darkness. As the fires burn, the evil influences that linger among the shadows of darkness are dispelled, thus allowing people to overcome obstacles and reach their fullest potential in the seasons to come.

It was on the hill of Tepeyac, just north of Mexico City, in 1531, that an Indian named Juan Diego saw an apparition he believed to be the Virgin Mary. The vision instructed him to have a church built on the spot, which had formerly been the cult-site of the Aztec Mother Goddess Tonantzin. At the time, the bishop disbelieved him, until the Virgin appeared for a third time and miraculously produced roses that Juan Diego presented to the bishop. As he did, the portrait of the Virgin appeared on Juan’s cloak. The shrine was built and is still a famous place of pilgrimage.

 

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Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Assumption of the Virgin Mary


Fairy Comments & Graphics

August 15

 

Assumption of the Virgin Mary

 

This is the major feast of Mary in the Roman Catholic Church, the “Feast of Mary in Harvest” in the Irish Church, and the major feast of all churches that bear her name. As the Assumption is commonly depicted with Mary ascending through the clouds, she has become the patron of aircraft pilots and crew.

Formerly on this day, women were admitted to the Sistine Chapel between first and second vespers, being excluded the rest of the year lest they should disturb devotions with their chatter.

Prayer

Almighty, ever-living God, You raised to

eternal glory the body and soul of the

immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother os your

Son. Grand that our minds may always be

directed heavenward and that we may deserve

to share in her glory. Amen.

Celebrating Other Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Miracle at Lourdes

February 11th

Miracle at Lourdes (France)

It was on this day in 1858 that the famous apparition of Our Lady at Lourdes was seen by a poor peasant girl, Bernadatte. This was the last manifestation at the gorto which had been known for many centuries as the shrine of the Goddess.

Born Marie Bernarde Soubrious, Bernadatte (1844 – 1879) suffered from asthma, poverty, and a lack of education. At the age of 14, on February 11, Bernadatte experienced a vision of the Virgin Mary while collecting firewood on the bank of the River Gave near Lourdes. During the next six months, she saw a series of 18 visions in which  the Lady identified herself as “the Immaculate Conception” and told Bernadatte to drink from a nearby spring. The Lady also instructed Bernadatte to erect a chapel on the site. Since that time, the spring has produced 27,000 gallons of water each week and has been the site of countless miracles of healing.

 

Magickal Activity

Healing Bath

Items needed:

One white candle

Fresh mint

Fresh lavender

Light the candle and place it next to the tub so the water will reflect its light. As you fill the tub with water, add the mint and lavender leaves. Just before you step into the tub, stir the water with your hand as you chant:

“Elements and herbs lend your power,
Bring me healing from this hour.”
 

Soak in the tub for 15 minutes. At the end of this time, stand in the tub and let the water out. As the water drains from the tub, visualize all your ailments (or problems) leaving your body and flowing away with the water.

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Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Sada, Tonantzin, Our Lady of Guadalupe

December 12th

Sada, Tonantzin, Our Lady of Guadalupe

Annually on this day in Iran, huge bonfires are ignited as the sun sets to exemplify how the power of light can overcome the power of darkness. As the fires burn, the evil influences that linger among the shadows of darkness are dispelled, thus allowing people to over come obstacles and reach their fullest potential in the seasons to come.

It was on the hill of Tepeyac, just north of Mexico City, in 1531, that an Indian named Juan Diego saw an apparition he believed to be the Virgin Mary. The vision instructed him to have a church built on the spot, which had formerly been the cult-site of the Aztec Mother Goddess Tonantzin. At the time, the bishop disbelieved him, until the Virgin appeared for a third time and miraculously produced roses that Juan Diego presented to the bishop. As he did the portrait of the Virgin appeared on Juan’s cloak. The shrine was bult and is still a famous place of pilgrimage.

The Goddess, The Virgin

The Goddess, The Virgin

The Virgin is the first aspect of the Goddess that dates back to Grecian times. “Holy Virgin” was a title for temple prostitutes, a duty of the priestesses of Ishtar, Asherah, or Aphrodite. The title itself did not mean virginity, but it simply meant “unmarried.” The functions of these “holy virgins” was to give forth the Mother’s grace and love by sexual worship; to heal; to prophecy; to perform sacred dances; to wail for the dead; and to become Brides of God.

The Semites, and parthenioi by the Greeks called children born of such virgins bathur. Both terms mean virgin-born. According to the Protoevangelium, the Virgin Mary was a kadesha and perhaps was married to a member of the priesthood known as the “fathers of the gods.”

There is an analogy between Mary’s impregnation and that of Persephone’s. The latter, in her virgin guise, sat in a holy cave and began weaving the great tapestry of the universe, when Zeus, appearing as a phallic serpent, impregnated her with the savior Dionysus. Mary sat in a temple and began to spin a blood-red thread, representing Life in the tapestry of fate. The angel Gabriel came to Mary, telling her that the spirit of the Lord would over shadow her and she would be with child. (Luke 1:28-31) This child was Jesus Christ, who many call savior.

In the Hebrew Gospels the name Mary is designated by almah which means “young woman.” The reason that Mary is held to have remained a virgin by Catholics and some Christians is because Matthew in his gospel used the Greek word parthenos, meaning “virgin,” instead of almah when referring to the virgin birth of Jesus. Also almah was derived from Persian Al-Mah, the unmated Moon goddess. Another cognate of this term was the Latin alma, “living soul of the world,” which is essentially identical to the Greek psyche, and the Sanskrit shakti. So the ancient Holy Virgins, or temple-harlots, were “soul-teachers” or “soul- mothers.” Thus comes the term alma mater.

Daily Feng Shui Tip for September 8

‘Hail, holy Queen, Mother of Mercy! Our life, our sweetness, and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve; to thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn, then, most gracious Advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this our exiles show unto us the blessed fruit of they womb, Jesus. Oh clement, oh loving, oh sweet Virgin Mary.’ It’s ‘Virgin Mary Day,’ that’s why.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com