THE ORIGIN OF FRIDAY THE 13TH AS AN UNLUCKY DAY

Being wary of Friday the 13th is much more than a quaint superstition observed by a few uneducated people in distant, unreachable towns and hamlets. In the United States alone, it is estimated that between 17 and 21 million people dread that date to the extent that it can be officially classified as a phobia.

So why is Friday the 13th considered such an “evil” day?

The origins aren’t perfectly clear, but we do know that both Friday and, separately, the number 13 have long been considered unlucky and it was around the late 19th century that the first documented instances started popping up of people putting the two together to form the unluckiest day of all.

To read the rest of this article go to:

http://www.todayifoundout.com/index.php/2013/09/the-origin-of-friday-the-13th-as-an-unlucky-day/

Friday the 13th

riggatriskaidekaphobia

Do you consider Friday the 13th to be an unlucky day? If so, you might be mildly superstitious, just like many of us. According to the Stress Management Center and Phobia Institute in Asheville, North Carolina, millions of Americans are more or less afraid of Friday the 13th.

However, you need to feel more than a little uneasy about the date to be diagnosed with friggatriskaidekaphobia, an actual psychological condition marked by a disabling fear of Friday the 13th. Some people who have this disorder are even too afraid to say the words “Friday the 13th.” Others avoid flying on a plane, going to work, or even getting out of bed. Symptoms of this phobia range from mild anxiety and a nagging sense of doom to full-blown panic attacks.

The name of the phobia derives from Frigg, the Norse goddess whom Friday is named after, and triskaidekaphobia, which is Greek for the fear of 13. It’s also known as paraskevidekatriaphobia, which is based on paraskevi, the Greek word for Friday.

August Is the Worst… Friday the 13th

2020’s second Friday the 13th is this Friday Posted by Bruce McClure in HUMAN WORLD | November 11, 2020

( There will be other posts on out affiliate websites CovenLife.co)

November 13, 2020, will be the second of 2020’s two Friday the 13ths. This Friday the 13th comes exactly 39 weeks – that is, the number 3 multiplied by the number 13 – before the next Friday the 13th on August 13, 2021. Whee!

History of Friday the 13th

Long considered a harbinger of bad luck, Friday the 13th has inspired a late 19th-century secret society, an early 20th-century novel, a horror film franchise and not one but two unwieldy terms—paraskavedekatriaphobia and friggatriskaidekaphobia—that describe fear of this supposedly unlucky day.

The Fear of 13

Just like walking under a ladder, crossing paths with a black cat or breaking a mirror, many people hold fast to the belief that Friday the 13th brings bad luck. Though it’s uncertain exactly when this particular tradition began, negative superstitions have swirled around the number 13 for centuries.

While Western cultures have historically associated the number 12 with completeness (there are 12 days of Christmas, 12 months and zodiac signs, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 gods of Olympus and 12 tribes of Israel, just to name a few examples), its successor 13 has a long history as a sign of bad luck.

The ancient Code of Hammurabi, for example, reportedly omitted a 13th law from its list of legal rules. Though this was probably a clerical error, superstitious people sometimes point to this as proof of 13’s longstanding negative associations.

Fear of the number 13 has even earned a psychological term: triskaidekaphobia.

Why is Friday the 13th Unlucky?

According to biblical tradition, 13 guests attended the Last Supper, held on Maundy Thursday, including Jesus and his 12 apostles (one of whom, Judas, betrayed him). The next day, of course, was Good Friday, the day of Jesus’ crucifixion.

The seating arrangement at the Last Supper is believed to have given rise to a longstanding Christian superstition that having 13 guests at a table was a bad omen—specifically, that it was courting death.

Though Friday’s negative associations are weaker, some have suggested they also have roots in Christian tradition: Just as Jesus was crucified on a Friday, Friday was also said to be the day Eve gave Adam the fateful apple from the Tree of Knowledge, as well as the day Cain killed his brother, Abel.

The Thirteen Club

In the late-19th century, a New Yorker named Captain William Fowler (1827-1897) sought to remove the enduring stigma surrounding the number 13—and particularly the unwritten rule about not having 13 guests at a dinner table—by founding an exclusive society called the Thirteen Club.

The group dined regularly on the 13th day of the month in room 13 of the Knickerbocker Cottage, a popular watering hole Fowler owned from 1863 to 1883. Before sitting down for a 13-course dinner, members would pass beneath a ladder and a banner reading “Morituri te Salutamus,” Latin for “Those of us who are about to die salute you.”

Four former U.S. presidents (Chester A. ArthurGrover ClevelandBenjamin Harrison and Theodore Roosevelt) would join the Thirteen Club’s ranks at one time or another.

Friday the 13th in Pop Culture

An important milestone in the history of the Friday the 13th legend in particular (not just the number 13) occurred in 1907, with the publication of the novel Friday, the Thirteenth written by Thomas William Lawson.

The book told the story of a New York City stockbroker who plays on superstitions about the date to create chaos on Wall Street, and make a killing on the market.

The horror movie Friday the 13th, released in 1980, introduced the world to a hockey mask-wearing killer named Jason, and is perhaps the best-known example of the famous superstition in pop culture history. The movie spawned multiple sequels, as well as comic books, novellas, video games, related merchandise and countless terrifying Halloween costumes.

What bad things happened on Friday 13th?

On Friday, October 13, 1307, officers of King Philip IV of France arrested hundreds of the Knights Templar, a powerful religious and military order formed in the 12th century for the defense of the Holy Land.

Imprisoned on charges of various illegal behaviors (but really because the king wanted access to their financial resources), many Templars were later executed. Some cite the link with the Templars as the origin of the Friday the 13th superstition, but like many legends involving the Templars and their history, the truth remains murky.

In more recent times, a number of traumatic events have occurred on Friday the 13th, including the German bombing of Buckingham Palace(September 1940); the murder of Kitty Genovese in Queens, New York (March 1964); a cyclone that killed more than 300,000 people in Bangladesh (November 1970); the disappearance of a Chilean Air Force plane in the Andes (October 1972); the death of rapper Tupac Shakur (September 1996) and the crash of the Costa Concordia cruise ship off the coast of Italy, which killed 30 people (January 2012).

Sources

“The Origins of Unlucky Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Friday the 13th: why is it unlucky and other facts about the worst day in the calendar,” The Telegraph.
“13 Freaky Things That Happened on Friday the 13th,” Live Science.
“Here’s Why Friday the 13th is Considered Unlucky,” Time.
“Friggatriskaidekaphobes Need Not Apply,” New-York Historical Society.

There’s a Full Moon Due on Friday the 13th for Most of the U.S. The Next One Isn’t for Another 30 Years

Time Magazine September 12, 2019

BY GINA MARTINEZ

The next full moon is set to make an appearance on the most ominous date on the calendar this month.

A September full moon, also known as a “Harvest Moon,” will be visible to many Americans this Friday the 13th.

According to NASA, the moon will be full early Saturday morning, Sept. 14, at 12:33 a.m. EST, but for those who live in the Central, Mountain and Pacific time zones, the full moon will be visible shortly before midnight on Friday the 13th.

NASA says that the moon will appear full for about three days centered around this time — from Thursday night through Sunday morning.

To read the rest Friday 13, 2019

Unlucky January Dates

      Unlucky January Dates

1. 2. 4. 5. 10. 15. 17. 29.

According to the English historian Richard Grafton these certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day. Exactly why these dates are unlucky is unclear today but by looking at the calendar of days an idea of the major occurrences can be seen.

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Ah, Heck Yeah, It’s Friday, Friday, Friday! TGIF!

Days Of The Week Comments

The following is taken from an article on Beliefnet.com, “13 Ways To Improve Your Luck.” This one struck me in particular because most of these superstitions or “ways to change your luck,” comes from our Religion. This is the last article of 13, you are to do this when all else fails. Take a look!

And When All Else Fails…

Get yourself a good luck charm; I highly recommend authentic four-leaf clover. Or… Step in a shadow! Or… Place sugar in your  cup before the teabag. And last, but finally not least, for those of you who are  willing to take risks and go out on a limb, wear your clothing inside-out. All  these superstitions are guaranteed to improve your luck – as well as receive  attention and some stares from onlookers, for sure!

Makes you wonder, how our Religion can be “so wrong,” since everyone and their brother has stolen from it since the beginning of time. Hmm….

Magickal Graphics

Calendar of the Sun for Friday, Jan. 13th

Calendar of the Sun
13 Wolfmonath

Compitalia Mania, Day of the Mother of Ghosts

Colors: White and Black
Element: Air
Altar: Upon cloth of black lay many sheer cloths of white, which each person takes as they enter and places over their heads. Lay out also four white candles, incense of myrrh, many loaves of bread made in the shape of men and women, and many skeins of handspun wool.
Offerings: Woolen effigies, to be made in the ritual. Make offerings in a graveyard.
Daily Meal: Fasting today until the evening meal.

Compitalia Mania Invocation

We call upon thee, Mania, Mother of Ghosts,
On this your day when you arise to admonish us.
Let not the spirits of the Dead torment us,
For we love and remember them.
Let not the spirits of the Dead pursue us,
For we wish them peace and rest.
Let not the spirits of the Dead wail in our ears,
For we cannot give them life, or comfort,
And so we beseech thee, Mother of Ghosts,
To take them into your dark arms
And sing them to sleep until it is time
For them to come once more
Into the world of life and breath and body.
(The bread loaves are passed around. Each is named with the name of someone dead who refuses to be forgotten. They are eaten.)
Hail, Mania, Mother of Ghosts!
We take these your children into our bodies,
We make them part of our lives,
And then return them again to the Earth.
May they live again in our flesh and blood
For these few days, and share our thoughts
And hopes, and dreams, and make themselves ready
To come once again into flesh of their own.

(The wool skeins are passed around, and fashioned into the shape of men and women, the Children of Mania, the Manes. These are hung about the house, over windows and doorways, in order to honor the Manes and keep them from tormenting the living.)