Book Binding Ritual

Book Binding Ritual

 

Items You will Need:

The Book

Plain white cotton string

 

The Spell:

Those of us who study the Old Ways of Natural Magick are usually fond of books. Our fondness often leads us to loan them to friends. Unfortunately, loaning a book may mean that we’ll never see it again. Hence, this book binding ritual. It utilizes knot magick. Binding and knots are ruled by the element Earth. In Natural Magick, knots are physical objects that both represent intangible goals (such as the return of loaned property) and absorb personal power. The following spell utilizes the power of the knot in this way. This ritual is not intended to force or to coerce another human being to return a book; it’s a spell to ensure the book’s return. It doesn’t affect the loanee; it affects the book itself. Before you loan the book, hold it between your palms. Send personal power into it while saying:

“By hill and wind, by flame and brook,

By shining moon and sea;

I place a bind Upon this Book

That it return to me.”

Wrap one foot of plain white cotton string around the book, securing the string with a knot. Knot tightly, but leave enough slack so that you can slip off the string with out untying the knot. As you make the knot, visualize the book returning to you and say once again:

“By hill and wind, by flame and brook,

By shining moon and sea;

I place a bind Upon this Book

That it return to me.”

Slip off the knotted cord. Put it in some secret place. As you actually loan the book, say the words even again (under your breath). The book should, indeed, return to you. Once it has, untie or cut the cord. It’s done its work.

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Compelling a Liar To Confess

Compelling a Liar To Confess

 

Items You Will Need:

Purple Candle

Compelling Oil

Parchment Paper

Pen

 

The Spell:

If you suspect someone is a liar but are not sure, get a purple candle and dress it with Compelling oil. Write the person’s name on a piece of parchment paper nine times and cross and cover that name with your name nine times.  Place the paper under the candle and burn it for seven days while the moon is waxing. Each night you light it, call the person’s name and say:

“I compel you to tell me the truth!”

On the seventh night wrap the left-over candle wax in the paper and throw it in running water or at a crossroads. He will be compelled to tell the truth then and may confess to many lies.

(Compelling Oil is made with a variety of herbs, among them Calamus Root.)

Simple Tarot Divination Spell

Simple Tarot Divination Spell

 

Items You Will Need:

Tarot Cards

 

The Spell:

Many times we would like to know the outcome of casting a particular spell. Will it accomplish the goal exactly as we envisioned?  This simple spell will help give you insight before you cast. While holding a deck of Tarot cards, relax and focus on your goal.  Say the words:

“Show me the true Path!”

Draw three cards.

The first represents past influences, the second shows the current situation, and the final card will show the outcome of casting the spell.

Fire Divination

Fire Divination

 

Items You Will Need:

Fire of Azrael Incense

 

The Spell:

Once the fire has died to a glowing reddish-white mass of coals, stare into its heart. If you wish, throw some Fire of Azrael incense onto the coals (equal parts cedar, juniper & sandalwood). This will flare up & burn, but will quickly die down. With the scented smoke rising from the divination incense scry in the coals. See what shapes the charred wood seem to form, & determine their meaning through the language of symbolism.

Mabon Balance Meditation

Mabon Balance Meditation

Celebrating the Dark and the Light

Mabon is a time of balance, and this simple meditation will help you focus on bringing harmony to your life.

A Time of Positive and Negative Energy

Mabon is one of those times of year that affect people in different ways. For some, it’s a season to honor the darker aspects of the goddess, calling upon that which is devoid of light. For others, it’s a time of thankfulness, of gratitude for the abundance we have at the season of harvest. No matter how you see it, Mabon is traditionally a time of balance. After all, it’s one of the two times each year that has equal amounts of darkness and daytime.

Because this is, for many people, a time of high energy, there is sometimes a feeling of restlessness in the air, a sense that something is just a bit “off”. If you’re feeling a bit spiritually lopsided, with this simple meditation you can restore a little balance into your life.

Setting the Mood

Now that fall is here, why not do an autumn version of Spring Cleaning? Get rid of any emotional baggage you’re dragging around with you. Accept that there are darker aspects to life, and embrace them, but don’t let them rule you. Understand that a healthy life finds balance in all things.

You can perform this ritual anywhere, but the best place to do it is outside, in the evening as the sun goes down. Decorate your altar (or if you’re outside, use a flat stone or tree stump) with colorful autumn leaves, acorns, small pumpkins, and other symbols of the season. You’ll need a black candle and a white one of any size, although tealights probably work best. Make sure you have something safe to put them in, either a candle holder or a bowl of sand.

Light both candles, and say the following:

A balance of night and day, a balance of light and dark Tonight I seek balance in my life as it is found in the Universe. A black candle for darkness and pain and things I can eliminate from my life. A white candle for the light, and for joy and all the abundance I wish to bring forth. At Mabon, the time of the equinox, there is harmony and balance in the Universe, and so there shall be in my life.

Meditate on the things you wish to change. Focus on eliminating the bad, and strengthening the good around you. Put toxic relationships into the past, where they belong, and welcome new positive relationships into your life. Let your baggage go, and take heart in knowing that for every dark night of the soul, there will be a sunrise the next morning.

How To Celebrate an Autumn Full Moon – Group Ceremony

How To Celebrate an Autumn Full Moon – Group Ceremony

Celebrate the autumn full moon outdoors!

In addition to — or instead of — holding a monthly Esbat rite, some Wiccan and Pagan groups prefer to have a season-specific full moon ceremony. During the autumn months, the harvest season begins with the Corn Moon in late August, and continues through September’s Harvest Moon  and the Blood Moon of October. If you’d like to celebrate one or more of these moon phases with a ritual specific to the harvest, it’s not hard. This rite is written for a group of four people or more, but if you needed to, you could easily adapt it for a solitary practitioner.

Here’s How:

  1. Try to hold this ritual outside. Fall nights are usually crisp and cool, and a perfect time for outdoor rituals. Ask each member of the group to bring an item to place on the altar — something that represents the bounty of the harvest. Decorate the altar with these seasonal goodies. Some ideas would be:
    • A basket of apples
    • Gourds, squashes, or small pumpkins
    • Indian corn
    • Colorful leaves
    • Stalks of grain or wheat

     

    You’ll want to include quarter candles, as well as a cup of wine or cider. If you’re including Cakes and Ale as part of your celebration, place your cakes on the altar as well.

  2. Assign a member of the group to call each quarter. Each person should stand at their assigned quarter holding their unlit candle (and a lighter or matches), and facing the altar. If there are more than four of you present, form a circle.

    Some traditions choose to begin rites facing east, while others prefer the north. This ritual begins with the calling of the north quarter, but you can adjust or adapt it based on the needs of your own tradition.

  3. The person in the north quarter lights their green candle, holds it to the sky, and says:

    We call upon the powers of Earth, and welcome you to this circle. May the fertile soil of the land bring us prosperity, abundance, and the bounty of the land, in this time of harvest.

    Place the candle on the altar.

  4. The person to the east should light her yellow candle, hold it to the sky, and say:

    We call upon the powers of Air, and welcome you to this circle. May the winds of change bring us wisdom and knowledge in this season of abundance and bounty.

    Place the candle on the altar.

  5. Moving to the south, light the red candle and hold it to the sky, saying:

    We call upon the powers of Fire, and welcome you to this circle. May the shining light of this season’s moon illuminate our way through the coming winter.

    Place the candle on the altar.

  6. Finally, the person to the west lights the blue candle, holds it to the sky, and says:

    We call upon the powers of Water, and welcome you to this circle. May the cool autumn rains wash away the last comforts of summer, and prepare us for the chill that is to come.

    Place the candle on the altar.

  7. Have everyone in the circle join hands and say:

    We gather tonight by the light of the moon, to celebrate the season, and rejoice. May the next turn of the Wheel bring us love and compassion, abundance and prosperity, fertility and life. As the moon above, so the earth below.

    Go around the circle, passing the wine or cider. As each person takes a sip, they should share one thing they are looking forward to in the coming month. Do you hope to manifest financial independence? Develop your intuitive powers? Or are you perhaps hoping to grow your relationships? Now is the time to state your intent.

  8. Take a moment to reflect on the bounty of the season. When everyone is ready, either move on to your next ceremony — Cakes and Ale, Drawing Down the Moon, healing rites, etc. — or end the ritual.

Tips:

  1.  Quarter candles are colored candles based on the colors of the four cardinal directions: green for north, yellow for east, red to the south and blue in the west.

What You Need

  • Candles for each of the four quarters
  • A cup of wine or cider
  • Symbols of the harvest to decorate the altar

How to Hold a Gratitude Ritual

How to Hold a Gratitude Ritual

By Patti Wigington

Do a Gratitude Ritual to express your thankfulness.

For many Wiccans and Pagans, autumn is a time of thanks giving. Although this is the most obvious around the Mabon holiday, if you live in the United States, most of your friends and family will be giving thanks in November. If you’d like to tie in to that a little, but with a Pagan flair, you might want to consider doing a short gratitude ritual as a way of expressing your own thankfulness.

Here’s How:

  1. Before you begin, decorate your altar with symbols of the season. You may want to choose items that represent abundance, such as:
    • Baskets of fruit, such as apples or grapes
    • Cornucopias
    • An abundance mandala
    • Colors associated with abundance, such as gold and green
    • Symbols of things you’re thankful for, such as your health or your career
    • Photos of your family and friends who mean a lot to you

    You’ll also want to have a candle on your altar. Gold or green is preferable, but you can use another color if it signifies abundance to you. Also, make a batch of Gratitude Oil ahead of time to use in the ritual.

  2. If your tradition calls for you to cast a circle, go ahead and do so.

    As you begin, take a moment to reflect on the abundance in your life. When we say abundance, it doesn’t necessarily mean material or financial gain — you may be abundant if you have friends who love you, a satisfying family life, or a rewarding career. Think about that things you have for which you are most grateful. These are the things you will be focusing on in this rite. As you’re thinking about these things, anoint the candle with the Gratitude Oil, and then light it on your altar table or workspace.

  3. If you have a particular deity in your tradition who is associated with thankfulness, you may wish to call out to this god or goddess and invite them into your circle. If not, that’s okay too — you can express your gratitude to the universe itself.
  4. Beginning at one corner of the table, begin saying the things you are thankful for, and why. It might go something like this:

    I am thankful for my health, because it allows me to feel well. I am thankful for my children, for keeping me young. I am thankful for my career, because each day I get paid to do what I love. I am thankful for my job, because I am able to feed my family. I am thankful for my garden, because it provides me fresh herbs. I am thankful for my coven sisters, because they make me feel spiritually complete…

    and so forth, until you have expressed your thankfulness for everything in your life.

  5. If you’re doing this ritual with a group, each person should anoint a candle of their own, and call out their own things that they are thankful for.

    Take a few more minutes to meditate on the candle flame, and to focus on the notion of abundance. While you’re thinking about things you are grateful for, you might also wish to consider the people in your life that are grateful towards you, for the things you have done. Recognize that gratitude is a gift that keeps on giving, and that counting one’s blessings is an important thing to do, because it reminds us of how truly fortunate we are.

  6. Note: It’s important to realize that one of the things about being thankful is that we should let people who have made us happy know they’ve done so. If there’s someone specific you wish to thank for their words or actions, you should take the time to tell them so directly, instead of (or in addition to) merely doing a ritual that they’ll never know about. Send a note, make a phone call, or tell them in person how much you appreciate what they’ve done for you.

What You Need

  • Symbols of what you’re thankful for
  • A candle
  • Gratitude Oil

How To Hold a Hearth and Home Rite for Mabon

How To Hold a Hearth and Home Rite for Mabon

By Patti Wigington

Mabon is a time of balance, and it is the time to celebrate the stability of the hearth and home. This ritual is a simple one designed to place a barrier of harmony and security around your property. You can do this as a family group, as a coven, or even as a solitary. If you live in an apartment, feel free to adapt the rite as necessary. The key here is to focus on the perimeter of your personal space, whether you have a half-acre yard, a big rural spread, or a downtown condo.

Here’s How:

  1. You’ll need the following items:
    • A bowl of fresh earth from your yard
    • An assortment of iron nails* (railroad spikes work nicely if you can get them)
    • A brown or green candle to represent the land

    There is no need to cast a circle before beginning this rite, because you will be casting a magical perimeter as part of the working.

  2. Begin at the entrance to your property that sees the most traffic. If you have a yard and house, this will likely be the end of the driveway, where it connects to the street. If you live in an apartment or town home, you may wish to use your front door, or the hallway in front of your door. You may want to put your supplies on a tray or in a bag, if you’re doing this alone. If you have other people participating, give each person some items to carry. You can do this rite at any time of the day, although evening may be better if you don’t want your neighbors to come over and ask what you’re up to.
  3. Place the bowl of earth at the entrance to your property. If you like, you can place it on a table, or you can just set it on the ground. Place your hands into the bowl, and feel the cool soil on your fingertips. Feel the energy of the earth, traveling from the ground, up into the bowl, through the dirt, and into you.
  4. Focus on the bowl of earth, and say:

    Earth, symbol of security and stability, bring peace and harmony into my home at this season of thanksgiving. May my family be well, my house be a haven, and my table be one of hospitality. May the earth, the soil, the land, ground me and protect me and those whom I love, and that which I call mine. My property shall be a safe place, a secure place, a harmonious place for all those who enter. As I will, so it shall be.

  5. Leave the bowl in place, and begin slowly walking around the perimeter of your property, traveling in a deosil, or clockwise, direction. Feel the energy of your land, and the way in which you connect with it. Is there a tree you particularly love? Or the big rock where the kids always sit? Or that weird piece of root that you trip over every time? Consider why your property is home instead of just a place to live. Even if you live in an apartment, you can do this — what about that creaky spot by the door that your mom always hears when you come in late? All of these make a house personal and connect us to it.
  6. Periodically — and depending on how many iron nails or railroad ties you’ve got — stop and touch the ground. Drive a nail or spike into the dirt – iron is known as a protective material  throughout many cultures. As you push it into the earth, say:

    Iron spike, in the ground, protect my home, my family and me. Keep out that which would cause us harm.

  7. Repeat this with each iron nail or spike, until you’ve placed a protective barrier around your property. By now, you should have returned to your bowl of earth at the entrance. Light the green or brown candle, and place it within the bowl. Pack the earth lightly around it so that the candle doesn’t topple over. Say:

    Dark and light, equal parts at the time of Mabon. Fire and earth, together. Balance, harmony, security, these things shall be mine.

  8. If there is a particular deity of your tradition that represents hearth and home, now might be a good time to call upon them asking for assistance. If you do so, be sure to make an offering in their honor. If you choose not to call upon deity at this time, just take a few moments to reflect on your home life, and the things that mean security to you. When you are finished, bring the bowl with the candle inside, and place it in a spot where all can see — on your hearth, or the kitchen table — and allow it to sit until the candle goes out. When the candle has burned away, return the earth to your property.

Tips:

  1. Even if you just live in one room of a home, you can still do this rite. Simply adapt it so that you’re going around the perimeter of the room, beginning with the doorway. Instead of pounding iron spikes into the ground, you can tuck a small nail up under the edge of the carpet.
  2. It has been pointed out that in some areas, the ground may freeze enough to push iron nails out of the ground, which could cause problems once things warm up – no one wants a small child to step on a rusty nail! If you live in an area where this may be a problem, you may wish to remove the nails at certain times of year, or at the very least, check to make sure they are securely in the ground.

What You Need

  • A bowl of earth
  • Iron nails or railroad spikes
  • A green or brown candle