Aleuromancy

Aleuromancy


An ancient divinatory practice which utilized flour. Sentences were written on pieces of paper, each of which was rolled up in a little ball of flour The balls of flour were thoroughly mixed up nine times and then divided amongst the curious, who anxiously waited to learn their fate. The custom lingered in remote areas into the nineteenth century.


Apollo, who supposedly presided over this divination form, was surnamed Aleuromantis.

Recipe For Bread of the Dead

Bread of the Dead

Serve with milk or hot chocolate, and offer some to your departed ancestors, so they may breathe in its essence and be nourished, before you gobble it up yourself!
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 Tablespoons sugar
1/4 t. salt
1 egg
2/3 cup milk
1/4 cup vegetable oil
10 drops anise extract
Mix all of the above until smooth. Heat the oven to 400 degrees and grease a cookie sheet. With clean hands, mold the dough into a round shape with a knob on the top (which will be a skull) or into smaller round shapes, animals, faces or angels. Place dough on cookie sheet.
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 T. flour
1 t. ground cinnamon
1 T. melted butter
Mix together brown sugar, flour, cinnamon and melted butter for the topping. Sprinkle topping on dough and bake for 20 to 25 minutes. When cool, decorate the skull shaped knobs, animals or faces with icing sugar to make eyes, nose and mouth.

Seedy Spellwork

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Seedy Spellwork

After carving up those pumpkins, don’t just throw the seeds away or eat them all. In each little pumpkin seed lies a large store of natural energy. Save seeds to bring magick to your life year-round. They’re great for increasing strength, promoting prosperity, encouraging health, and enhancing growth and expansion. Grind them to include in incense and magickal powders, carry one in your pock for a good luck talisman, or tie a few inside a small square of fabric to make a charm to promote peace and balance in the home. You can even use pumpkin seeds to create your own set of biodegradable runes—just use a pen and some natural ink to make the glyphs.

—-Melanie Marquis

Compelling a Liar To Confess

Compelling a Liar To Confess

 

Items You Will Need:

Purple Candle

Compelling Oil

Parchment Paper

Pen

 

The Spell:

If you suspect someone is a liar but are not sure, get a purple candle and dress it with Compelling oil. Write the person’s name on a piece of parchment paper nine times and cross and cover that name with your name nine times.  Place the paper under the candle and burn it for seven days while the moon is waxing. Each night you light it, call the person’s name and say:

“I compel you to tell me the truth!”

On the seventh night wrap the left-over candle wax in the paper and throw it in running water or at a crossroads. He will be compelled to tell the truth then and may confess to many lies.

(Compelling Oil is made with a variety of herbs, among them Calamus Root.)

Apple Scones

Apple Scones

1 Medium-Sized Apple
2 Cups (280 grams) Flour
3 Teaspoons Baking Powder
2 Tablespoons Sugar
1/2 Teaspoon Ground Cinnamon
1/2 Teaspoon Salt
6 Tablespoons Vegetable Shortening
1/2 Cup (112 grams) Raisins
1/4 Cup (60 milliliters) Apple Juice

Peel, core, and mince the apple. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit (200 degrees Celsius). Mix the flour, sugar, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. With a pastry blender, cut in the shortening. Stir in the apples and raisins. Add the apple juice to stiffen the dough.

Turn the dough out onto a floured surface. Roll the dough to about 1/2 inch (1.25 centimeter) thickness. Cut into triangles or into shapes with cookie cutter. Bake on an ungreased baking sheet for 10 minutes or until light brown.