May the God & Goddess Bless You & Yours On This Thursday Morn’!

Good Morning Images
I pledge this day to do my best
To put the past behind me
Walking straight with head held high
So fortune’s favor finds me.
 
Yesterday is gone and done
Tomorrow lies before me
I will not let myself be bound
By history’s faded story.
 
No longer looking toward the past
Except for lessons learned
I’m moving toward the future now
And all that I have earned.
 
So Mote It Be.
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Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Festival of Jana and Janus

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year

Festival of Jana and Janus

On this day the ancient Romans honored Jana, whose name means “luminous sky,” and her husband Janus, the guardian of all passageways. At their festival, a ram was sacrificed to Janus for his continue protection and Jana was invoked to shine her light on the New Year. To the Romans, who believed that the spirit of Janus hovered over all doorways, gates and passageways, this was a time of great consequence.

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TUESDAY – The Day of Mars
, The Day of Honour

TUESDAY

The Day of Mars
 The Day of Honour

tiwesdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
dienstag (Germanic)
dies martis (Latin)
mangal-var (Hindu)
mungul (Islamic)
mardi (French)
ka youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the third day of the week. ‘Tiu’, also ‘Tiw’, was associated with Mars who was the Roman god of War. Tiu was the younger brother of Thor and son of Odin. The French later closely translated this name to ‘Mardi’ or ‘Mar’s Day’. Mars has also been associated with Zeus or ‘Zeus’s Day’ later being developed by the Anglo-Saxons. It was thought that to meet a left-handed person in the early morning on a Tuesday would bring misfortune for the rest of the day according to a traditional Scandinavian belief. It has been suggested that this may because of the fact that the day related to the God of War. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

TUESDAY – The Day of Mars, 
 The Day of Honour

TUESDAY

The Day of Mars
 The Day of Honour

tiwesdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
dienstag (Germanic)
dies martis (Latin)
mangal-var (Hindu)
mungul (Islamic)
mardi (French)
ka youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the third day of the week. ‘Tiu’, also ‘Tiw’, was associated with Mars who was the Roman god of War. Tiu was the younger brother of Thor and son of Odin. The French later closely translated this name to ‘Mardi’ or ‘Mar’s Day’. Mars has also been associated with Zeus or ‘Zeus’s Day’ later being developed by the Anglo-Saxons. It was thought that to meet a left-handed person in the early morning on a Tuesday would bring misfortune for the rest of the day according to a traditional Scandinavian belief. It has been suggested that this may because of the fact that the day related to the God of War. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

TUESDAY – The Day of Mars
 The Day of Honour

Days Of The Week Comments
TUESDAY

The Day of Mars
 The Day of Honour

tiwesdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
dienstag (Germanic)
dies martis (Latin)
mangal-var (Hindu)
mungul (Islamic)
mardi (French)
ka youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the third day of the week. ‘Tiu’, also ‘Tiw’, was associated with Mars who was the Roman god of War. Tiu was the younger brother of Thor and son of Odin. The French later closely translated this name to ‘Mardi’ or ‘Mar’s Day’. Mars has also been associated with Zeus or ‘Zeus’s Day’ later being developed by the Anglo-Saxons. It was thought that to meet a left-handed person in the early morning on a Tuesday would bring misfortune for the rest of the day according to a traditional Scandinavian belief. It has been suggested that this may because of the fact that the day related to the God of War. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

(For more information see Mystical WWW Mystical Time : Mystical Months).

Celebrating Spirituality 365 Days A Year – Festival of the Penates

magick89

October 14

Festival of the Penates

The Penates were Roman Gods of the store-cupboard and protectors of the household along with the Lares. They were the guardians of the pantry, and small statues of them were place along with those of the Lares, within each household. They were worshipped along with Vesta (Goddess of the hearth). Just as with the Lares, a portion of food from every family meal was set aside for them or tossed onto the hearth fire as a small offering for their continued protection. The festival held for them on this day was a state affair and was held in honor of the Roman Penates Publici–the Penates that presided over the city

Celebrating Our Spirituality 365 Day A Year – August 23

witches_tools___magic_stock_by_sassy_stock-d10mf82

 

Celebrating Our Spirituality 365 Day A Year – August 23

August 23

Vocanalia

Vulcan was the ancient Roman God of fire and smithcraft. He had his own Flamen, the Flamen Vocanalis.

Very little is known about his festival and worship, but he did have a temple on the Campus Martius. Mythologically, Vulcan was the father of the fire-breathing monster Cacus, and his two consorts were Maia and Hora–also worshipped during his festival.

Deities of the Fields

Deities of the Fields

Gods and Goddesses of the Early Harvest

By , About.com Guide

When Lammastide rolls around, the fields are full and fertile. Crops are abundant, and the late summer harvest is ripe for the picking. This is the time when the first grains are threshed, apples are plump in the trees, and gardens are overflowing with summer bounty. In nearly every ancient culture, this was a time of celebration of the agricultural significance of the season. Because of this, it was also a time when many gods and goddesses were honored. These are some of the many deities who are connected with this earliest harvest holiday.

  • Adonis (Assyrian): Adonis is a complicated god who touched many cultures. Although he’s often portrayed as Greek, his origins are in early Assyrian religion. Adonis was a god of the dying summer vegetation. In many stories, he dies and is later reborn, much like Attis and Tammuz.
  • Attis (Phrygean): This lover of Cybele went mad and castrated himself, but still managed to get turned into a pine tree at the moment of his death. In some stories, Attis was in love with a Naiad, and jealous Cybele killed a tree (and subsequently the Naiad who dwelled within it), causing Attis to castrate himself in despair. Regardless, his stories often deal with the theme of rebirth and regeneration.
  • Ceres (Roman): Ever wonder why crunched-up grain is called cereal? It’s named for Ceres, the Roman goddess of the harvest and grain. Not only that, she was the one who taught lowly mankind how to preserve and prepare corn and grain once it was ready for threshing. In many areas, she was a mother-type goddess who was responsible for agricultural fertility.
  • Dagon (Semitic): Worshipped by an early Semitic tribe called the Amorites, Dagon was a god of fertility and agriculture. He’s also mentioned as a father-deity type in early Sumerian texts and sometimes appears as a fish god. Dagon is credited with giving the Amorites the knowledge to build the plough.
  • Demeter (Greek): The Greek equivalent of Ceres, Demeter is often linked to the changing of the seasons. She is often connected to the image of the Dark Mother in late fall and early winter. When her daughter Persephone was abducted by Hades, Demeter’s grief caused the earth to die for six months, until Persephone’s return
  • Lugh (Celtic): Lugh was known as a god of both skill and the distribution of talent. He is sometimes associated with midsummer because of his role as a harvest god, and during the summer solstice the crops are flourishing, waiting to be plucked from the ground at Lughnasadh.
  • Mercury (Roman): Fleet of foot, Mercury was a messenger of the gods. In particular, he was a god of commerce and is associated with the grain trade. In late summer and early fall, he ran from place to place to let everyone know it was time to bring in the harvest. In Gaul, he was considered a god not only of agricultural abundance but also of commercial success.
  • Neper (Egyptian): This androgynous grain deity became popular in Egypt during times of starvation. He later was seen as an aspect of Osiris, and part of the cycle of life, death and rebirth.
  • Parvati (Hindu): Parvati was a consort of the god Shiva, and although she does not appear in Vedic literature, she is celebrated today as a goddess of the harvest and protector of women in the annual Gauri Festival.
  • Pomona (Roman): This apple goddess is the keeper of orchards and fruit trees. Unlike many other agricultural deities, Pomona is not associated with the harvest itself, but with the flourishing of fruit trees. She is usually portrayed bearing a cornucopia or a tray of blossoming fruit.
  • Tammuz (Sumerian): This Sumerian god of vegetation and crops is often associated with the cycle of life, death, and rebirth.

Tuesday, The Day of Mars – The Day of Honour


Days Of The Week Comments

TUESDAY

The Day of Mars -
 The Day of Honour

tiwesdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
dienstag (Germanic)
dies martis (Latin)
mangal-var (Hindu)
mungul (Islamic)
mardi (French)
ka youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the third day of the week. ‘Tiu’, also ‘Tiw’, was associated with Mars who was the Roman god of War. Tiu was the younger brother of Thor and son of Odin. The French later closely translated this name to ‘Mardi’ or ‘Mar’s Day’. Mars has also been associated with Zeus or ‘Zeus’s Day’ later being developed by the Anglo-Saxons. It was thought that to meet a left-handed person in the early morning on a Tuesday would bring misfortune for the rest of the day according to a traditional Scandinavian belief. It has been suggested that this may because of the fact that the day related to the God of War. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

TUESDAY, The Day of Mars
, The Day of Honour

TUESDAY

The Day of Mars
 The Day of Honour

tiwesdaeg (Anglo-Saxon)
dienstag (Germanic)
dies martis (Latin)
mangal-var (Hindu)
mungul (Islamic)
mardi (French)
ka youbi (Japanese)

Traditionally seen as the third day of the week. ‘Tiu’, also ‘Tiw’, was associated with Mars who was the Roman god of War. Tiu was the younger brother of Thor and son of Odin. The French later closely translated this name to ‘Mardi’ or ‘Mar’s Day’. Mars has also been associated with Zeus or ‘Zeus’s Day’ later being developed by the Anglo-Saxons. It was thought that to meet a left-handed person in the early morning on a Tuesday would bring misfortune for the rest of the day according to a traditional Scandinavian belief. It has been suggested that this may because of the fact that the day related to the God of War. According to the English historian Richard Grafton certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day.

Calendar of the Sun for January 4th

Calendar of the Sun

4 Wolfmonath

Terminalia: Janus’s Day

Color: Dark Blue and Black
Element: Air
Altar: Upon cloth of dark blue and black place a ruler, and on one side things of the past, and on the other side things for the future, including a goblet of wine.
Offerings: Measure something accurately. Any work requiring measuring is honored today.
Daily Meal: Any old-fashioned recipe.

Invocation to Janus

Hail, Lord Who Looks Both Ways!
Hail, face of the past
Turned towards memory!
You see all that has been,
Not only our beginnings,
But our past deeds
Which have brought us to this day.
May we learn to take responsibility for them.
Hail, face of the future
Turned towards possibility!
You see all that might be,
A multitude of choices,
Yet that multitude is pruned
Back to a likely few
By the deeds of the past.
Hail, Lord who stands at the boundary
Of then and now, of there and here.
We stand also at that boundary.
Teach us to see how the past
Shapes the future in its hands,
That we may not be blind to our own divinity.

Chant:
Measure the line
With memory
Stand on the line
Of possibility

(Pour out the libation of wine and exit. Work today should concentrate on making or mending things. See especially to fences and gates. Planning for future events is also acceptable.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

 

Correspondences for Sacred Plants of the Winter Solstice

Sacred plants of the Winter Solstice

by Selena Fox

HOLLY

Symbolizing: Old Solar Year; Waning Sun; Protection; Good Luck

Forms: boughs over portals, wreaths

Divinities: Holly King; Old Nick; Saturn; Bacchus; Wood Spirits; Holly Boys

Traditions: Roman, Celtic, English, Christian

 

 

MISTLETOE

Symbolizing: Peace, Prosperity, Healing, Wellness, Fertility, Rest, Protection

Forms: boughs, amulet sprigs above doorways, kissing balls

Divinities: Oak Spirit; Frigga and Balder

Traditions: Celtic, Teutonic

 

 

IVY

Symbolizing: Fidelity, Protection, Healing, Marriage, Victory, Honor, Good Luck

Forms: crowns, wreaths, garlands

Divinities: Dionysius; Bacchus; Great Goddess; Ivy Girls

Traditions: Greek, Roman, English, Christian

 

 

FRANKINCENSE

Symbolizing: Sun, Purification, Consecration, Protection, Spiritual Illumination

Forms: incense, oils

Divinities: Sun Gods, Ra at Dawn, Bel

Traditions: Babalyonian, Assyrian, Egyptian, Jewish, Greek, Roman, Christian

 

 

MYRRH

Symbolizing: Healing, Death and Afterlife, Purification, Inner Peace

Forms: incense, oils

Divinities: Isis, Ra at Midday

Traditions: Egyptian, Jewish, Christian

 

 

WHEAT

Symbolizing: Sustenance, Abundance, Fertility, Good Luck

Forms: grain, straw figures and symbols, cookies, cakes, breads

Divinities: Earth Goddesses; Saturn & Ops; Goat Spirit; Fairy Folk

Traditions: Roman, Celtic, Scots, Teutonic, Sweedish, Christian

The Wicca Book of Days for June 19 – The Celtic Pantheon

The Wicca Book of Days for June 19

The Celtic Pantheon

The Gods and Goddesses venerated by the European Celtic people were local divinities identified with features of the landscape, the creatures and trees that inhabited it, and the tribes that lived there (Brigantia being the Goddess whom the Brigantes worshiped in Britain, for instance). Because the Celtic tradition was oral, the nature of these deities remain imprecise but something of their individual characters survived if they were subsequently fused with Roman divinities or Christian saints. Perhaps the best know Celtic God is Cernunnos, or the Horned God.

Circles and Spirals

Circles and spirals were important mystical symbols to the Celts, representing as they did the Sun and Fire, eternity, fertility and life itself. Wear jewelry bearing one or other of these dynamic symbols next to your skin today and become infused by the energy that it emits.

I Walk My Own Path

I Walk My Own Path

Author: Melody BlueMoon

When I was younger, I never really felt a connection to my parents’ Christian God. I liked to hear the beautiful stories, but I just never felt like any of it was real for me.

As I grew up, I became almost irritated with my parents’ religion and started to act out spiritually. I watched The Craft, got obsessed with Charmed, and stole my sister’s copy of Harry Potter and the Sorcerers Stone. I started visiting websites about Black Magic, though the most I ever did was look at pictures and I cast one spell to make it rain and another to lose a few pounds. Neither worked.

When I got into middle school, I started to pay closer attention to Charmed and noticed a reoccurring word throughout the series: Wiccan. And being the internet-savvy child of the 90’s that I was, I Googled it.

I was intrigued. This wasn’t the dark, almost evil magic that I had dabbled with online. This was a rather beautiful religion, talking about things like The Goddess and ‘Harm none.’ I started looking up everything I could about this and other Pagan Paths.

I never did any rituals, or cast any spells, but I did discover that my sister was into similar things. My sister told me that my brother dabbles with Tarot cards, my great-aunts work with crystals, and my aunt believes in reincarnation…and that my very devout Catholic grandmother didn’t care what you believed in, as long as you truly believed in it. She also mentioned that the women of our family may or may not have some psychic ability, however small it was.

While Wicca had seemed attractive to me, after a year or two of researching and learning about this particular Path, I realized it simply wasn’t for me. I simply classified myself as an Eclectic Pagan for a while. I never felt quite right with any of the various established Paths, so I eventually gave up on finding a specific one. I had nothing against being Eclectic; I just wished I had something more definite.

Then, I discovered my own Path.

It came about because of a writing assignment for a mythology class. We had to create a culture and that culture’s mythology, its Creation Story, at least two of its heroes, and the creation of Man. As a writer, I wanted to make it perfect. I created so many gods and goddesses, worked so hard on the myths that I ended up handing it in late.

But the main thing is that while I worked on all this, I felt much more spiritual than any other time in my life, more connected, more like something was right. And while I don’t worship the Gods and Goddesses of that particular pantheon, it did inspire me to create my own personal mythology, my own personal religion. And so I set forth on My Path.

I looked at other mythologies, other religions to see what I wanted My Path to be like.

I read up on the Greek and Roman myths I had loved as a child. I reread my Children’s Bible and the Bible my mother bought me when I became a teenaged girl. I read the stories of the Native Americans and asked my Native friends for more. I bought mythology books, New Age books; I even bought a few books about angels and fairies. My sister took me to a psychic and I got a reading done. (And discovered my Power Animals: an Armadillo and a canine that she was unable to identify.) I looked to Africa, to Japan, to India. I looked at the Norse Gods of my Viking ancestors on my father’s side. I looked to the Celtic ones on my mother’s. I looked to Islam, to Judaism, to Buddhism, to Taoism. You give me an -ism, I probably looked into it.

I liked the idea of the Triple Goddess, but felt that the Crone wasn’t quite what I wanted. Nothing against her, but she didn’t fit. Maybe later on, but not yet. I liked the idea of a Mother Goddess, but didn’t want Her to just be Mother Earth; I wanted Her to be Mother Sky as well. I wanted Her to be a Goddess of the Moon, the Stars. I wanted a Goddess of Lust, Desire, Love. And I wanted her to be a little Dark. Not evil, but not exactly good either. (My first image of her involves her holding a heart and a dagger to stab it with.) She actually appeared in the mythology assignment, and has changed little from that first appearance. She even has the same name. Fire was always hers. I wanted someone to preside over Karma and/or Reincarnation. I wanted this god or goddess to be almost perfectly neutral, and to also preside, in some way, over knowledge.

And so I came across M, L, and S on My Path. (And at one point there was a J, but he moved on to another part of My Path, and received a new name.)

I discovered that M was to be a dark-skinned female with white or silver hair, to denote her connection to the Moon and the Night Sky. I’ll admit, the way I imagine the Goddess looks a bit like Storm of the X-Men. I discovered that L liked to change her appearance, but primarily had very pale skin and yellow eyes, her hair either deep red or black. I discovered that I couldn’t quite get a fix on what S looked like, but he wore Greek and Roman togas and cloaks.

I’ve always believed in reincarnation, at least a little. I liked the thought of a place between lives, not quite an afterlife, but a place to go after your life is over, and before it begins again.

And so I found Home.

As I worked with the Three Gods, I also came across Eight Sacred Warriors, four male, four female. I also discovered that they were the first to find Home and to inhabit it.

I’ll admit, that the purpose of this essay was a bit selfish; I don’t want to be alone. I want others to know some of my beliefs. I hope that someday I’ll be able to share them with another, perhaps a significant other, or my children. But the main point was to inform others who, while they have found Pagan Paths that seemed very attractive to them they just weren’t for them, that they can make Their Own Path, just as I have made My Path.

If there isn’t any particular religious Path that works for you, you can work on your own. After all, nearly every religious Path in existence today started out similarly. I’m not delusional enough to think that My Path will someday become a major religion, or even one that anyone other than myself follows. But it is mine, and I shall always think of it fondly, even if on My Path, I find another that suits better.

The downside of walking my own Path is that while I have a set of beliefs personally tailored to fit me, there’s really no one out there to talk to about them, as I’m the first to have these specific beliefs. I’ll never be able to walk around a Pagan event and stumble across a booth about my Path. Well, not unless it’s my booth. I can’t look on the web for a group for my Path.

But I Walk My Own Path, and you too can walk your own, if you truly wish it.

If you are Eclectic, but wish for something more definite as I did, you can do as I did. Again, nothing against Eclectic Practitioner, as I still refer to myself as an Eclectic Solitary Practitioner. What else can you call yourself when you walk a Path no one else does?

Blessed Be.

Happy Monday, dear, dear friends! Here’s Today’s Affirmation, Thought & Meditation.

Monday Images, Pics, Comments, Graphics
Today’s Affirmation for Monday, April 16th

I am determined to live the full breadth of life’s road as well as its length. There may be important things nestling in the hedgerows or lying neglected on the verge.

 

Today’s Thought for Monday, April 16th

Once we have found the true path, destiny unfolds before us like a red carpet.

Author Unknown

 

Today’s Meditation for Monday, April 16th

Looking Both Ways

Janus, the Roman God of thresholds, provides an appropriate focus for reflection when you are embarking upon a new phase in your life. He is often depicted with two faces – one of a child looking forward into the future and one of a bearded old man looking back into the past. Visualize yourself standing in a doorway, on the threshold of your new venture. Standing beside you is Janus. Looking behind you, survey your past and ask the old face of Janus to recount the most important lessons you have gathered from your previous experiences. Then look forward and ask the young face of Janus for some positive energy for the future. Encouraged by his hopefulness, set out on your journey.