Good Old Folk Wisdom

Folk Wisdom

1. Do not walk behind me, for I may not lead. Do not
walk ahead of me, for I may not follow. Do not walk
beside me either. Just pretty much leave me the hell
alone.
 
2. The journey of a thousand miles begins with a
broken fan belt and a leaky tire.
 
3. It’s always darkest before dawn. So if you’re going
to steal your neighbor’s newspaper, that’s the time to
do it.
 
4. Don’t be irreplaceable. If you can’t be replaced,
you can’t be promoted.
 
5. No one is listening until you fart.
 
6. Always remember you’re unique. Just like everyone
else.
 
7. Never test the depth of the water with both feet.
 
8. If you think nobody cares if you’re alive, try
missing a couple of car payments.
 
9. Before you criticize someone, you should walk a
mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticize
them you’re a mile away and you have their shoes.
 
10. The most wasted day of all is one in which we
have not laughed.
 
11. If at first you don’t succeed, skydiving is not
for you.
 
12. Give a man a fish and he will eat for a day. Teach
him how to fish, and he will sit in a boat and drink
beer all day.
 
13. If you lend someone $20 and never see that person
again, it was probably worth it.
 
14. If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember
anything.
 
15. Some days you are the bug; some days you are the
windshield.
 
16. Don’t worry; it only seems kinky the first time.
 
17. Good judgment comes from bad experience, and a lot
of that comes from bad judgment.
 
18. The quickest way to double your money is to fold
it in half and put it back in your pocket.
 
19. A closed mouth gathers no foot.
 
20. Duct tape is like the Force. It has a light side
and a dark side, and it holds the universe together.
 
21. There are two theories to arguing with women.
Neither one works.
 
22. Generally speaking, you aren’t learning much when
your lips are moving.
 
23. Experience is something you don’t get until just
after you need it.
 
24. Never miss a good chance to shut up.
 
25. We are born naked, wet and hungry, and get slapped
on our ass… then things get worse.
 
26. Never, under any circumstances, take a sleeping
pill and a laxative on the same night.
 
27. There is a fine line between “hobby” and “mental
illness.”
 
28. No matter what happens, somebody will find a way
to take it too seriously.
 
29. There comes a time when you should stop expecting
other people to make a big deal about your
birthday…around age 11
 
30. Everyone seems normal until you get to know them.

More Good Afternoon Comments

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Witch Balls

Witch Balls
By
Amber
K

Folklore gives us many ways to protect and bless our homes, from a
sprig of rowan fastened near the entryway to the brightly colored
hex signs of the Pennsylvania Dutch, to the inverted horseshoe
nailed above the door to “catch the luck” and hold it. The “Witch
Ball” is one more protective device.

A Witch Ball is a hollow glass sphere hung at a window, or in a
corner of a room near the ceiling, that averts or traps evil before
it can bring harm to the occupants of the home. It may only a couple
of inches in diameter, or large as a pumpkin.

Some writers have said they were called “Witch Balls” because they
were made to protect a home from Witches. It is just as possible,
however, that the balls were used by Witches to ward their own
homes, and those of their clients.

No one knows exactly when these talismans first were used. The
manufacture of glass and the ability to make blown-glass vessels are
very old skills; the Roman Empire had a lively trade in glass two
thousand years ago. We know that Witch Balls were used in Old
England, but whether this was a legacy of the Roman occupation or a
later custom is uncertain. Certainly Witch Balls were common in
colonial America.

Many witch balls were coated inside with silver nitrate. It was said
that these reflected the “evil eye” or any negative spell back on
the sender. Also, any demon seeing his face reflected in the silver
ball would be frightened and flee, or maybe seeing the world
reflected in a curved, distorted way was enough to confuse him.
Other balls are created with slender threads or pillars of glass
inside to catch any evil spirit that ventured within. Yet others
were simply the glass balls, clear or green or blue, used by
fishermen to float their nets. Perhaps these were reflective enough
to work the same way as the silver balls.

Witch balls have also found their way into the garden as a form of
the large “gazing globes” on pedestals that adorned many Victorian
gardens and are still seen occasionally today. If a flower garden is
a place of beauty and serenity, a refuge from the cares of the
world, certainly it deserves protection as much as the house itself.

Another place where Witch balls turn up is on the family Christmas
tree – or more accurately the Yule tree, as the custom of dragging a
tree indoors is doubtlessly Pagan in origin. The tree may be a
variant on the Yule log, which was originally a huge dead tree (and
phallic symbol), conveyed to the manor house by the men of the
village with much singing and ribald horseplay. Their one end was
placed in the great hearth, and a fire kindled. Over several days of
feasting and festivity the Yule log was gradually pushed into the
fire as the end was consumed.

The Yule tree may also have been a representation of the World Tree
of old Northern Europe. The whole universe was imagined as a great
ash tree, called Yggdrasill. Its roots reached down into the Norse
underworlds, Niflheim and Muspelheim; its crown stretched up to
Asgard and the halls of the gods; and in its branches deer and other
wild creatures browsed. This great tree is akin to the Tree of Life
of the ancient goddess civilizations of the Near East.

On our Yule trees today we place lights and stars and candy canes,
carved animals and elves and Santa’s and – of course – little glass
spheres. Witch Balls. Gold for the reborn Sun god, and silver for
the Moon Goddess, whose blessings and protection we ask for the
coming new year. In Ancient Ways, Pauline Campanili suggests that
the “shiny glass balls catch the light of the new born Sun and send
it back as a magical means of enhancing the Sun’s energy.”
You can have your own Witch ball up year ’round. Buy a large and
beautiful Yule ornament, or seek out a glass fisherman’s float in an
antique shop, or look in a catalog of garden statuary such as
Toscano’s for a “gazing globe.” Give it a special place of honor in
your home or garden, invoke the gods of your choice, and consecrate
it to its protective purpose. Dust it frequently to remove any
negativity from its surface. Perhaps it will make your home that
much more of a safe have.

How To Make A Protection Witch Ball

glass ball or Yule ornament with an opening
bottle of silver paint
a spool of read thread
few drops of frankincense or patchouli oil
scissors

Cover you working space with newspaper to protect against spills.
Take the metal cap off the ornament. Carefully pour a little of the
silver paint inside the ball and swish it around until the inside is
completely covered with the silver. Set it aside to dry.

When the paint is totally dry, cut the red thread into three inch-
lengths. Carefully poke this thread into the open end of the ball.
Continue cutting and putting the thread into the ball until the ball
is nearly full. Put in a few drops of oil. Then put the end back on
the ornament. If it has no end, seal it with candle wax.
When you hang the protection ball, chant:

“Symbol of the Moon, symbol of the Lady divine,
Reject all negativity, defend this home (car), me and mine”.

This protection ball can be hung in the window of your home or in
your car. Any negative thoughts or ill wishes directed against you
are reflected back to the sender. You can also decorate the outside
with appropriate designs. You can put them onto wreaths or make them
part of a dried flower arrangement. Programmed for protection, these
little Witch balls do a very good job.

Witch’s Rosary

Witch’s Rosary

If these beads sound familiar, it is because they have been borrowed
from The Christian Rosary. And why not? Christians have always
borrowed from Pagans when it comes to spirituality, so why not
borrow back? Remember, all the Gods are One God.

The Rosary was invented in the Middle Ages as a devotion to Mary,
the mother of Jesus. Although the Church is quick to define Mary as
simply “first among the saints,” it is clear the common people from
the first century CE onwards saw Mary as the continuation of the
Queen of Heaven: Astarte in Palestine, or Isis in Egypt. It is
fitting, then, to adapt a Marian devotion for honor to the Goddess,
the Queen of Heaven. These beads honor the Goddess in her three-
fold, or triple, nature as Maiden, Mother, and Crone.

The components of a Witch Rosary are:

1) Moonstone (The Moon)
2) Hematite (Fire)
3) Crystal Quartz (Air)
4) Earth Stone (Earth)
5) Lapis Lazuli (Water)
6) Amber (Sun)
7) Birthstone (Stars)
8) Ankh, as pendant or buckle

Substitutions may be made as follows:

Substitutions may be made as follows:

1) Opal, Mother of Pearl
2) Flame Agate
3) Crystal
4) Emerald
5) Blue Amethyst
6) Chrysolite
7) Gem with a Natural Star
8) No substitute for the Ankh

If worn as a necklace, the stones may be separated by knots in the
cord, or there may be three silver beads between each stone.

If it is worn as a belt, there may be three wooden beads between
each of the leather pouches that holds a stone; these wooden beads
may in turn be separated by knots in the leather cord (usually), if
a cord is used.

You will need:

13 white 8mm beads for the Maiden
13 red 8mm beads for the Mother
13 black mm beads for the Crone
1 silver 10mm bead representing the Full Moon
52 silver spacer beads
(class “E” 6/0) representing the Moonlight.
Nylon thread: white or ecru, or color of choice

You may begin and end stringing anywhere in the loop, but the tie-
off is
less visible in the midst of the black beads.

The silver Moon bead is separated from the White Maiden beads by
four (4) silver spacer beads. Each white Maiden bead is followed by
one silver spacer bead, but the thirteenth bead is followed by four
(4) spacer beads. Then come the red Mother beads, each followed by
one silver spacer, but the 13th bead is followed by four (4)
spacers. Then come the black Crone beads, each followed by one
silver bead, but the 13th is followed by four (4) spacers. And so we
are back at the silver Moon bead. In other words, beads of the same
color are separated by one spacer. The three sets of beads and the
larger Moon bead are separated by four spacers. Thirteen (13) beads
are used in each set to signify the thirteen months of the lunar
year. The silver spacers represent moonlight issuing from the Full
Moon bead throughout the life cycle of Maiden, Mother, Crone.
Prayers are said on each bead, while meditating on the mysteries of
the Triple Goddess, and the experience of the human life cycle. Men
may wish to make a devotion to the Horned God, and honor the life
cycle of Youth, Father, and Sage.

Prayers for your witch’s Rosary

On the silver Moon Bead say:
Blessed Mother, come to me,
and cast your lovely, silver light.
Un-cloud your face that I may see
unveiled, its shining in the night.
Triple Goddess, Blessed Be,
and Merry Meet, my soul’s delight!

On the space say:

I bind unto my self today the
Fertility of the Maiden.

Meditate of the Presence of the Maiden. On each Maiden Bead say:

Maiden daughter, sister, lover,
White-light, Night-light, love’s embrace;
Seeking love, we find each other
By the radiance of your face.

On the space say:

I bind unto myself today the
Power of the Mother.

Meditate on the Presence of the Mother. On each Mother Bead say:

Mother of all, radiant, beaming,
Full and heavy womb with expectation bright;
Be present here, full moonlight gleaming,
And bless your child with truth and light.

On the space say:

I bind unto myself today the
Wisdom of the Crone.

Meditate on the Presence of the Crone. On each Crone Bead say:

Crone now stands in moonlight gleaming,
Starlit night and silver hair;

Peace and wisdom from you streaming,
Goddess, keeper of our care.

On the space say:

I bind unto myself today the
Fertility, Power, and Wisdom of the Goddess.

On the silver Moon Bead conclude:

Blessed Mother, stay by me,
and cast your lovely, silver light.
Un-cloud your face that I may see
unveiled, its shining in the night.
Triple Goddess, Blessed Be,
and Merry Meet, my soul’s delight!
So Mote it be!

10 Tips for Using Essential Oils in the Home

10 Tips for Using Essential Oils in the Home

By J. Black

When guests enter your home the first thing that greets them is the
aroma. Essential oils are often used to create a homey atmosphere
within the home.
Add 6-8 drops of your favourite scent to water in a diffuser or place
the drops directly into a bowl of boiling water.

Sweet orange, lemon and your favourite spice oil are especially good
when diffused during the winter months for a refreshing, warming
aroma and atmosphere.

Candles fragranced with  can also be used to give the
home a pleasant ambience and aroma.

Other ways essential oils can be used around the home include…

1. Add a few drops of essential oil to water in a spray bottle to
freshen linen or spray on garments before .

2. As an air-freshener put 6-8 drops in 600 ml of water in a fine
spray bottle and spray into the air and towards carpets and curtains.
Do not spray onto velvet or silk and avoid spraying directly onto
wood.

3. Place cotton wool balls fragranced with lavender in drawers and
linen closet to deter moths.

4. Put 4 drops of oil onto a cotton wool ball and place behind the
heater or radiator in winter. Drops can also be used with the
humidifier.

5. Clean your fridge with a one drop of orange, mandarin, mint,
lavender or lemon oil added to the final rinse water.

6. When washing down surfaces in the kitchen 1 drop of lemon, thyme,
cypress, lavender or palma rosa placed directly on a cloth or
alternatively 7 drops in water.

7. Put a drop or two of oil onto a cold light bulb in a lamp so the
fragrance fills the room as it heats up.

8. Essential oils are used to clean the air rather than mask smells
in the home. To rid a room of stale tobacco or cooking smells use
cinnamon, eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, orange, tea tree, rosemary or
lime for their ability to freshen and cleanse the air of stagnant
smells throughout the house.

Saturate cotton wool balls and place in the corners of a room, in
cupboards or out-of-the-way places to fragrance kitchens and living
areas throughout the house.

9. Hallways are the place where we greet our guests. Use lemon, lime,
bergamont or grapefruit. Lavender or geranium can be mixed with any
of these. Lavender is uplifting in the morning and geranium has a
calming effect and good for afternoons when you may need to wind down
at the end of the day

10. Keep tea tree oil in your first aid kit for cuts, burns and head lice.

 

Some Substitutions for Essential Oils

Some Substitutions for Essential Oils

Bergamot Substitute — Grapefruit
Cajuput Substitute — Camphor (White)
Chamomile Substitute — Lavender
Clary Sage Substitute Equal Parts — Sage, Nutmeg
Cypress Substitute — Cedarwood
Grapefruit Substitute — Lemon
Jasmine Substitute — Ylang Ylang
Lime Substitute — Lemon
Lemon Substitute — Lime
Lemongrass Substitute — Lemon
Mandarin Substitute — Tangerine
Mandarin Substitute — Orange
Melissa Substitute Equal Parts — Lemon, Petitgrain
Melissa Substitute — Lemon
Neroli Substitute — Petitgrain
Orange Substitute — Tangerine
Patchouli Substitute — Vetiver
Rose Substitute — Rosewood
Rose Substitute — Geranium
Rosewood Substitute Equal Parts — Geranium, Cedarwood
Sandalwood Substitute Equal Parts — Benzoin, Cedarwood
Spearmint Substitute — Peppermint
Tangerine Substitute — Orange
Tea Tree Substitute Equal Parts — Lavender, Camphor (White)

The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy by Valerie Ann Worwood.

Unlucky February Dates

Unlucky February Dates

8. 10. 17. 26. 27. 28.

According to the English historian Richard Grafton these certain dates of the month were unlucky as published in the ‘Manual’ in 1565. Days throughout the year were identified and of course could have related to any day of the week. The date was the most important point to consider. The work was reputed to have some credence with support given by astronomers of the day. Exactly why these dates are unlucky is unclear today but by looking at the calendar of days an idea of the major occurrences can be seen.

The Magickal, Mystical Month, February

Mystical Month, February

 

‘Oh, long, long

The snow has possessed the mountains.

The deer have come down and the big-horn,
They have followed the sun to the south
To feed on the mesquite pods and the bunch grass.
Loud are the thunder drums in the tents of the mountains.
Oh, long, long
Have we eaten
and dried deer’s flesh of the summer killing.
We are tired of our huts

and the smoky smell of our clothing.

We are sick with the desire for the sun

And the grass on the mountain.

Paiute Late Winter Song

The name February is believed to have derived from the name ‘Februa’ taken from the Roman ‘Festival of Purification’. The root ‘februo’ meaning to ‘I purify by sacrifice’.

As part of the seasonal calendar February is the time of the ‘Ice Moon’ according to Pagan beliefs, and the period described as the ‘Moon of the Dark Red Calf’ by Black Elk (Black Elk Speaks, Neihardt). February has also been known as ‘Sprout-kale’ by the Anglo-Saxons in relation to the time the kale and cabbage was edible.

 

It is a time when favourable colours to improve personal healing are amethyst, white and blue-violet (the colour of crocus). These are the colours often associated with winter whilst the delicate crocus and snowdrops, along with the scented carnation lend beauty and a glimpse of the fine weather to come in spring to a time of austerity.

The herbs and produce of the woodland too are closely connected, with nuts and cones, musk, marjoram and mimosa lending sweetness. As the second month of the winter calendar the holy thistle too reminds us of the link with winters rule and faith tested in times of extreme hardships. The fox and its brother on a distant shore the coyote find the ability to retrieve food in the harshest of environments. As we approach spring birds too are seen to be remembered with January, with the pheasant appearing from the hedgerow and the jay (and the blue-jay) taking to the wing as a sign of the skies and earth giving hope of insect life and nesting materials.

Metaphorical associations between the gospel writer ‘Mark’ and this period in the Celtic calendar known as ‘Imbolc’ which continues through to April. Mark was considered to be an ordinary man with incredible powers of communication evidenced in his writing which was thought of as colourful and exciting. The move between each story in the bible was seen to be swift and therefore was equated to the raging speed of the winds experienced at this time of the year. February is the first month of Imbolc, with the length of the day increases and with it the warmth and power of the sun, and the festival of ‘Candlemas’ (2 February) is central to both the Celtic and Christian beliefs.

The rhythms of nature are embodied in the woman, together with the ability to bring forth life. So the feast is associated with the potential fertility of the land, the preparation. In the Celtic church it is ‘Brigid’ (1 February) and in the Christian ‘St. Brigit’ (2 February) who personify these qualities. Both are associated with ‘Mary and motherhood’, ‘Gaia and the earth goddess’, the ‘motherhood of God’. This should be considered in connection with the astrological calendar, as here we see the symbol of the circle complete in ‘Pisces’ and the hope of life anew as we approach ‘Aries’, the end and the beginning, the old and the new, the death and the life. All indicate a higher spiritual awareness and growth. As a result the fish and the ram are important in animal mythology, although birds too have great significance as we approach the period of Easter

As part of the astrological calendar, February has many associations. This is the month of the house of

Aquarius (20 January – February 19) and the house of Pisces (20 February – March 20).

 

‘Crystalline brother of the belt of heaven,
Aquarius! To whom King Jove has given

Two liquid pulse streams ‘stead of feathered wings.’

John Keats

Aquarius is the eleventh sign of the zodiac and depicted as ‘Ganymede’, a youthful male water carrier, also known as the ‘God with Two Streams’. Ganymede became cup-bearer to the ‘Olympian Gods’, ruled over by ‘Zeus’, and borne to ‘Mount Olympus’ on the back of an eagle. Out of the carrier springs new wisdom, for the good of humanity. The ‘Age of Aquarius’, generally thought to commence around 2000 AD, is foreseen as one which will embody these qualities. It is also the subject of many predictions, some of which indicate Armageddon, the Second Coming of Christ, one of major natural cataclysmic occurrences, and a shift in the earth’s axis. Yet the New Age is also the subject of excitement not because as it has been suggested the beginning of Aquarius will prelude either the weakening or strengthening of Christianity, but that with the new era comes a religion will be wholly embraced. So far this has been deemed to be one based on the now famous statement ‘Make love not war’. A desire to move away from materialism and violence is predicted to surface. There has, however, been extreme concern shown on the place of drugs in all this with some predicting that the New Age will signal no more than the beginning of a period not of reawakening but of sleep dictated by a drug induced delirium.

‘Uranus’ is the ruling planet of Aquarius bringing with it the qualities of revolution, change, unpredictability and disruption. Aquarius is a fixed and positive air sign associated with the statement ‘I am the embodiment of all that society needs or desires’, ‘I universalise’, and ‘I will change’. It rules the circulation and ankles. It is associated with the Ash, Birch, Cherry, Elder, Fig, Plum, and the Rowan, and with the flowers Apple, Lemon & Peach Blossom and Orchid. Colours associated with Aquarius are aquamarine, electric blue and turquoise tones. The main stone associated with Aquarius is Aquamarine. Lucky number is four, lucky day Saturday. Metals associated are aluminium and uranium.

 

‘There is a tide in the affairs of men,
Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
Omitted, all the voyage of their life

Is bound in shallows and in miseries.’

Pisces is the twelfth sign of the zodiac, symbolised by the ‘Fish’ and the Roman ‘God Neptune’, also known as ‘The Mystic’. The ‘Age of Pisces’ witnessed the birth of Christ and the glyph more often associated with the Christian religion was, for the first five to six hundred years, the fish.

This period is generally taken to have started before the birth of Christ, approximately 200 BC. The duration of the Age of Pisces has been calculated to be one-twelfth of 25,725 years, working out to 2,143. The figure most usually referred to though for calculating the length of the Equinox is 2,160 years. The ‘Age of Aquarius’ which follows Pisces in the precession of the Equinoxes is generally thought to start at the beginning for the new millennium, around 2000 AD. There is dispute over he exact date of the dawn of the New Age.

 

We can be sure that before Pisces was the Age of Aries, and before this the Age of Taurus, thought to be around 4000 – 2000 BC. The progress of the Ages follows the opposite path to the one most associate with the annual path of the zodiac. Within each period it is also clear that the symbol of the house has held much influence and importance, for example in ancient Egyptian mythology, the God Apis was highly revered during the Age of Taurus, with many cult groups taking the glyph of the bull to symbolise belief, obedience and respect.

The influence of Neptune is clear in the house of Pisces possessing the qualities of spiritual development, romance, lyricism, dreaminess, caring, perception and intuition. ‘Jupiter’ is the ruling planet of Pisces bringing with it a belief in the highest most positive powers of the universe.

As the last house before ‘Aries’, Pisces strives to find peace before death with the cosmos, which must be achieved in order to move on, hence the extraordinary evolution that can occur as the month progresses. It is seen to represent the last stage of life and the ability to approach imminent change with ease, as of course Pisces represents the ability to progress from the material to the spiritual world. Pisces is a mutable and negative water sign associated with the statement ‘I am in harmony, in unison with the mysteries of the universe’. It rules the feet. Pisces is associated with Angelica, Iris, Orchids, Violets and Water Lilies, as well as Mosses, Ferns, and Seaweed.

Pisces is further associated with any tree that grows close to the water’s edge, including the Weeping Willow and also the Alder, Ash, Dogwood and Fig. Colours associated with Pisces are silver, sea greens, mauve, purple and violet. The main stone associated with Pisces is the Amethyst, whilst the man stone associated with the month of February is the Aquamarine. Lucky number is seven, lucky day. Metals associated are germanium and strontium.

‘Smooth runs the water where the brook is deep.’

William Shakespeare, Henry VI Part 2, Act III, Scene 1

Feng Shui For The Day, Feb. 5th: “First Thing In The Mornings”

Are you looking for love in all the right places, including your very own bedroom? If you’re intent on finding the perfect partner it’s important that you represent that same desire in the space that you will both eventually sleep in. It’s also important for you to remove all reminders of failed relationships and replace them with symbols that show your commitment to finding your new true love. Remember that whatever you see first thing upon awakening each day influences the energies that come your way, so put a picture of a loving couple in your line of sight. Soon enough you will roll over and see your other half. For real.

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

Daily Hexagram for Tuesday, February 5th is 4: Youthful Folly

4: Youthful Folly

Tuesday, Feb 5th, 2013

hexagram09

 

 

 

Be on guard for careless or rebellious attitudes characteristic of youthful inexperience. Just as a youth requires instruction, this is a good time to focus on learning your lessons from a patient teacher or life experience. Is there some circumstance in your life that you failed to comprehend, perhaps because you could not appreciate its inherent complexities? Be respectful of anything or anyone who has something to teach you right now.

In order to be prepared for challenges, let education be a part of your life. Continually develop the strong mind and will necessary to carry you through confusing times. The wise realize that experience is a powerful teacher, even though we cannot be forced to learn, even from experience. Be a good student, one who delights in learning, one who nourishes his or her expanding awareness, one who is paying attention!

Examine your attitude for factors that limit your openness. Observe how you deal with the mistakes of others. You must let people live their own lives and learn their own lessons. Offer others your wisdom or advice, but only if the other person is receptive (when in doubt, ask). Otherwise, give up trying to convince him or her that you are right, which is only exhausting and counter-productive. If people are not receptive, let them go their own way — even into difficulty or dangerous circumstances. It is the only way they can learn right now — and without learning, no one can achieve success. This does not mean that you should not care — just that taking care of someone too much can be harmful. Live and let learn.