Deities Associated with Friday – Frigg The Norse Goddess

 Legend Of The Dragon Princess
Deities Associated with Friday

Frigg The Norse Goddess

Areas of Influence: Frigg was the Norse Goddess of marriage, childbirth, motherhood, wisdom, household management and weaving and spinning.

She was the Queen of Aesir and the only one permitted to sit on the high seat other than her husband Odin.

This Goddess’s home was Fensalir (Marsh hall) in Asgard. All marshy and boggy ground was sacred to this Goddess.

As Goddess of weaving she was associated with weaving clouds and the threads of fate, known as Wyrd in the Nordic tradition. Despite this and the gift of prophecy she is unable to save her own son from his fate. The Goddess made him invincible to everything other than mistletoe but unfortunately Loki disguised himself and tricked her in to revealing this weakness.

She has more than ten handmaidens who assist her, the most well known of these are Hlin (Goddess of Protection), Gna (a messenger Goddess) and Fulla (a fertility Deity). Some academics have suggested that the attendants represent different faces of this particular Deity.

Barren women would invoke this Goddess and ask her to bless them with children.

Her name means “beloved one.” Other spellings of this Goddesses name include Frea, Fija, Friia, Frig and Friggja.

Origins and Genealogy: She was the daughter of Fjorgynn (the male personification of the earth) and was married to Odin with whom she had two sons, Balder and Hodr.

She was briefly married to Odin’s brother’s Vili and Ve as Odin had been away travelling a long time and was believed to be dead. When he finally returned, the marriage to Odin’s brothers was dissolved and she returned to her husband’s side.

Strengths: A loving mother and home maker.

Weaknesses: Unable to save her son.

Symbolism
Like Freya she wears a ravens clock.

She is associated with constellation the Orion’s Belt which was known as the Frig’s Distaff upon which she winds the threads of fate and weaves the clouds.

Sacred Birds: Ravens, hawks and falcons.

Sacred Plants: Frigg’s grass is a plant was traditionally used as a sedative during birth. Mistletoe is also sacred to her.

Frigg’s Archetype
The Mother
The Mother is a life-giver and the source of nurturing, devotion, patience and unconditional love. The ability to forgive and provide for her children and put them before herself is the essence of a good mother.
In its shadow aspect the Mother can be devouring, abusive and abandoning. The shadow Mother can also make her children feel guilty about becoming independent and leaving her. It is not necessary to be a biological Mother to have this stereotype. It can refer to anyone who has a lifelong pattern of nurturing and devotion to living things.

This Goddess was a devoted mother who was unable to prevent the death of her son. She is also a great domestic Goddess looking after the home.

How to Work With This Archetype
The Mother

You are exhibiting the features of the shadow Mother if you smother your children and are over protective. Encourage independence and allow children to make mistakes but be available to give care and advice when it’s needed.

The other shadow Mother is the one that abandons her children, or is so busy that she has no time for nurturing her young.

 

Source:

Goddess-Guide.com

Grandma’s House

Grandma’s House

by Amanda Silvers

I come from an ample extended family who, when I was younger, all got together to celebrate holidays, birthdays, weddings – any excuse for a party.

The winter holidays were always a frenzy of commotion, with 30-40 people taking part. The children were abundant: my mother had six, my aunt had four and my uncle had five. In addition there were other cousins, aunts, uncles, step siblings, ex-husbands, great aunts and second and third cousins.

My family, particularly my grandmother on my mother’s side, at whose household we held the holiday celebrations, enjoyed many traditions and superstitions about all sorts of things, especially Christmas and the New Year.

For instance, she said: if you don’t hang mistletoe above your front door, you’ll have bad luck. And if you do not kiss the person standing under the mistletoe, people will gossip about you. If you stand beneath the mistletoe and no one kisses you, you will not have a lover for a year.

If an unattached young man wanted to date a young woman, he could begin with a kiss under the mistletoe, and all would know his intentions were honorable. You were then considered an “item” and it was regarded almost an engagement.

The mistletoe customs were a fun and enlivening part of our holiday festivities; even when we were very young, we plotted when to get under it – trying to get the object of our desire to kiss us. This very seldom worked, because most of the time our dad or grandpa or some equally boring adult would kiss us before the inept young men got up the nerve.

Another great kissing practice is the “friendship ball,” generally made with a lemon, orange or lime and studded in some interesting and attractive manner with whole cloves.

The idea is to offer the ball to a person that you want to kiss, who then takes it, pulls out a clove with their teeth, chews it and then kisses the person who gave it to them. Then the one with the ball has the option to return it to the person that initially gave it to them, with another kiss, of course or to pass it on to another person and kiss them.

If someone offered you the kissing ball and you refused to kiss them, no one else would offer you one for the rest of the evening.

This game was fun, but more than a few conflicts were initiated when people had a tiny bit too much to drink and an individual kissed someone else’s wife or husband a few too many times or too passionately. The sparring individuals would ordinarily leave in a huff over that, but the kids found it a perfect way to emulate the “adult game” of kissing.

The New Year’s customs were regarded even more earnestly, if that were possible. We always had a special meal on New Year’s day, a sumptuous, extravagant meal, said to insure that we’d eat well the rest of the year. We toasted in the New Year together, as a family, lest one of us die during the year. We, even the kids, had champagne with strawberries, said to please the small folk into aiding us in accomplishing our desires. We toasted one another’s health, prosperity, good nature, marriage, etc. To shower good wishes on one another was necessary to insure that we’d prosper during the coming year. It has only been in the last few years that I no longer call my whole family long distance on New Year’s eve to carry on the tradition, it was that strongly ingrained in me.

More customs included that the last person to finish the meal on New Year’s day was going to get fat, or have a baby, depending on whether it was a man or woman. The first person to leave the house on New Year’s Day was supposed to kiss everyone in the house and they were to say “See ya later, alligator” before leaving the house. If one person was still asleep, or in the shower or something, the person leaving was to wait.

My grandmother, Ma Mère, was the one who was the fanatic about superstitions, and they carried over into everything, but the Christmas and New Year’s holidays customs were clearly the best. I endeavor to begin an amusing new tradition each year. You may want to use some of these or think of a festive new one for this year, and don’t forget the mistletoe!

Yuletide Herb – Mistletoe

Mistletoe

Botanical: Viscum album (LINN.)

Family: N.O. Loranthaceae

—Synonyms—Birdlime Mistletoe. Herbe de la Croix. Mystyldene. Lignum Crucis.

—Parts Used—Leaves and young twigs, berries.


The well-known Mistletoe is an evergreen parasitic plant, growing on the branches of trees, where it forms pendent bushes, 2 to 5 feet in diameter. It will grow and has been found on almost any deciduous tree, preferring those with soft bark, and being, perhaps, commonest on old Apple trees, though it is frequently found on the Ash, Hawthorn, Lime and other trees. On the Oak, it grows very seldom. It has been found on the Cedar of Lebanon and on the Larch, but very rarely on the Pear tree.

When one of the familiar sticky berries of the Mistletoe comes into contact with the bark of a tree – generally through the agency of birds – after a few days it sends forth a thread-like root, flattened at the extremity like the proboscis of a fly. This finally pierces the bark and roots itself firmly in the growing wood, from which it has the power of selecting and appropriating to its own use, such juices as are fitted for its sustenance: the wood of Mistletoe has been found to contain twice as much potash, and five times as much phosphoric acid as the wood of the foster tree. Mistletoe is a true parasite, for at no period does it derive nourishment from the soil, or from decayed bark, like some of the fungi do – all its nourishment is obtained from its host. The root becomes woody and thick.

—Description—The stem is yellowish and smooth, freely forked, separating when dead into bone-like joints. The leaves are tongue-shaped, broader towards the end, 1 to 3 inches long, very thick and leathery, of a dull yellow-green colour, arranged in pairs, with very short footstalks. The flowers, small and inconspicuous, are arranged in threes, in close short spikes or clusters in the forks of the branches, and are of two varieties, the male and female occurring on different plants. Neither male nor female flowers have a corolla, the parts of the fructification springing from the yellowish calyx. They open in May. The fruit is a globular, smooth, white berry, ripening in December.

Mistletoe is found throughout Europe, and in this country is particularly common in Herefordshire and Worcestershire. In Scotland it is almost unknown.

The genus Viscum has thirty or more species. In South Africa there are several, one with very minute leaves, a feature common to many herbs growing in that excessively dry climate; one in Australia is densely woolly, from a similar cause. Several members of the family are not parasitic at all,being shrubs and trees, showing that the parasitic habit is an acquired one, and now, of course, hereditary.

Mistletoe is always produced by seed and cannot be cultivated in the earth like other plants, hence the ancients considered it to be an excrescence of the tree. By rubbing the berries on the smooth bark of the underside of the branches of trees till they adhere, or inserting them in clefts made for the purpose, it is possible to grow Mistletoe quite successfully, if desired.

The thrush is the great disseminator of the Mistletoe, devouring the berries eagerly, from which the Missel Thrush is said by some to derive its name. The stems and foliage have been given to sheep in winter, when fodder was scarce, and they are said to eat it with relish.

In Brittany, where the Mistletoe grows so abundantly, the plant is called Herbe de la Croix, because, according to an old legend, the Cross was made from its wood, on account of which it was degraded to be a parasite.

The English name is said to be derived from the Anglo-Saxon Misteltan, tan signifying twig, and mistel from mist, which in old Dutch meant birdlime; thus, according to Professor Skeat, Mistletoe means ‘birdlime twig,’ a reference to the fact that the berries have been used for making birdlime.  Dr. Prior, however derives the word from tan, a twig, and mistl, meaning different, from its being unlike the tree it grows on. In the fourteenth century it was termed ‘Mystyldene‘ and also Lignum crucis, an allusion to the legend just mentioned. The Latin name of the genus, Viscum, signifying sticky, was assigned to it from the glutinous juice of its berries.

 

—History—Mistletoe was held in great reverence by the Druids. They went forth clad in white robes to search for the sacred plant, and when it was discovered, one of the Druids ascended the tree and gathered it with great ceremony, separating it from the Oak with a golden knife. The Mistletoe was always cut at a particular age of the moon, at the beginning of the year, and it was only sought for when the Druids declared they had visions directing them to seek it. When a great length of time elapsed without this happening, or if the Mistletoe chanced to fall to the ground, it was considered as an omen that some misfortune would befall the nation. The Druids held that the Mistletoe protected its possessor from all evil, and that the oaks on which it was seen growing were to be respected because of the wonderful cures which the priests were able to effect with it. They sent round their attendant youth with branches of the Mistletoe to announce the entrance of the new year. It is probable that the custom of including it in the decoration of our homes at Christmas, giving it a special place of honour, is a survival of this old custom.

           The curious basket of garland with which ‘Jack-in-the-Green’ is even now occasionally invested on May-day is said to be a relic of a similar garb assumed by the Druids for the ceremony of the Mistletoe. When they had found it they danced round the oak to the tune of ‘Hey derry down, down, down derry!’ which literally signified, ‘In a circle move we round the oak. ‘ Some oakwoods in Herefordshire are still called ‘the derry‘; and the following line from Ovid refers to the Druids’ songs beneath the oak:
        ‘—Ad viscum Druidce cantare solebant—.’
     Shakespeare calls it ‘the baleful Mistletoe,’ an allusion to the Scandinavian legend that Balder, the god of Peace, was slain with an arrow made of Mistletoe. He was restored to life at the request of the other gods and goddesses, and Mistletoe was afterwards given into the keeping of the goddess of Love, and it was ordained that everyone who passed under it should receive a kiss, to show that the branch had become an emblem of love, and not of hate.

 

—Parts Used Medicinally—The leaves and young twigs, collected just before the berries form, and dried in the same manner as described for Holly.

—Constituents—Mistletoe contains mucilage, sugar, a fixed oil, resin, an odorous principle, some tannin and various salts. The active part of the plant is the resin, Viscin, which by fermentation becomes a yellowish, sticky, resinous mass, which can be used with success as a birdlime.

The preparations ordinarily used are a fluid extract and the powdered leaves. A homoeopathic tincture is prepared with spirit from equal quantities of the leaves and ripe berries, but is difficult of manufacture, owing to the viscidity of the sap.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—Nervine, antispasmodic, tonic and narcotic. Has a greatreputation for curing the ‘falling sickness’ epilepsy – and other convulsive nervous disorders. It has also been employed in checking internal haemorrhage.

The physiological effect of the plant is to lessen and temporarily benumb such nervous action as is reflected to distant organs of the body from some central organ which is the actual seat of trouble. In this way the spasms of epilepsy and of other convulsive distempers are allayed. Large doses of the plant, or of its berries, would, on the contrary, aggravate these convulsive disorders. Young children have been attacked with convulsions after eating freely of the berries.

In a French work on domestic remedies, 1682, Mistletoe (gui de chêne) was considered of great curative power in epilepsy. Sir John Colbatch published in 1720 a pamphlet on The Treatment of Epilepsy by Mistletoe, regarding it as a specific for this disease. He procured the parasite from the Lime trees at Hampton Court, and recommended the powdered leaves, as much as would lie on a sixpence, to be given in Black Cherry water every morning. He was followed in this treatment by others who have testified to its efficacy as a tonic in nervous disorders, considering it the specific herb for St. Vitus’s Dance. It has been employed in convulsions delirium, hysteria, neuralgia, nervous debility, urinary disorders, heart disease, and many other complaints arising from a weakened and disordered state of the nervous system.

Ray also greatly extolled Mistletoe as a specific in epilepsy, and useful in apoplexy and giddiness. The older writers recommended it for sterility.

The tincture has been recommended as a heart tonic in typhoid fever in place of Foxglove. It lessens reflex irritability and strengthens the heart’s beat, whilst raising the frequency of a slow pulse.

Besides the dried leaves being given powdered, or as an infusion, or made into a tincture with spirits of wine, a decoction may be made by boiling 2 OZ. of the bruised green plant with 1/2 pint of water, giving 1 tablespoonful for a dose several times a day. Ten to 60 grains of the powder may be taken as a dose, and homoeopathists give 5 to 10 drops of the tincture, with 1 or 2 tablespoonsful of cold water. Mistletoe is also given, combined with Valerian Root and Vervain, for all kinds of nervous complaints, cayenne pods being added in cases of debility of the digestive organs.

Fluid extract: dose, 1/4 to 1 drachm.

Country people use the berries to cure severe stitches in the side. The birdlime of the berries is also employed by them as an application to ulcers and sores.

It is stated that in Sweden, persons afflicted with epilepsy carry about with them a knife having a handle of Oak Mistletoe to ward off attacks.

Magickal Herbal Use : Lesson 3 – The Less Common Herbs

Lesson Three: The Less Common Herbs

by Leillan

Ok, this is going to be done a little differently. I am going to give you a few of the most powerful herbs I know. Pay attention here.

Lets start with something that dates back to at least the Druids.

Mistletoe.  Mistletoe grows on huge Oak trees. Use Mistletoe for Protection, Love, Fertility, and Health. We all know the spell used at Yule (Christmas):  kissing under a sprig of mistletoe. But did you know to burn the mistletoe you kissed under?  This prevents the love shared under it from leaving. Mistletoe helps to love bond married couples and bring single people their one true love. A shared kiss under the mistletoe is like a shared wish in a wishing well. However, the berries are poison, so use caution. Although the stem has been used in healing, I would still be careful of children and pets around this plant.

Dragons Blood.  Dragons Blood is aligned with fire. As such, it carries the same strengths as fire. A pinch of Dragons blood added to other incense will increase the potency. Dragons blood increases the power of any herb it is used with. It will also increase a person’s strength and power. It is not, however, to be used lightly in the magickal setting. I have added a pinch of Dragons blood to the inside tube of my wand to increase the potency of any spells in which I use the wand.

Just a hint here… Dragons blood, when finely powdered, puffs up when you pour it. This wouldn’t be a problem, except that it also sticks to everything in comes into contact with.

Mandrake.  Mandrake was  traditionally gathered from under the gallows tree. It has been called the Witches Mannequin, the man herb, the gallows herb, and woman drake. In Celtic times people would look under the nearest tree used for hangings, seeking this root that looked so much like the figure of a person. It was, and still is, used for protection, fertility, money, love, health, and strength. Mandrake was also used as a poppet. Money, especially silver coins, placed beside a mandrake root is said to double. A mandrake root placed on the mantle is said to protect the home. Mandrake is also poisonous; so again, use caution around pets and children.

Holly.  Although Holly is a bush and not poisonous, it is steeped in folklore. Holly grown on the right side of your front door (facing the house) is said to prevent evil and negativity from coming in. In men, it promotes good luck since it is masculine in nature. (Ivy works the same for women). It is strong enough that it has been used (infused or distilled) and sprinkled on a new born babe to protect it.

True Love Powder

True Love Powder

 
 
This is a very ancient formula. Some recommend mixing it in food or water, as a love philter. Mistletoe has toxic properties–perhaps this is taking too much of a chance with romance. However, grind dried elecampane, mistletoe and vervain into a fine powder.
 
*Sprinkle the powder around the bed
 
*Use it as drawing powder
 
*Decorate an altar
 
*Dress a candle
 
*Carry it in a charm bag
 
If your heart is set on that love potion, a safer and perhaps even more powerful method of drawing on the powder of the herbal blend is to substitute the flower essence remedies made from each plant. Add a few drops of each to champagne or sparkling water.

Grandma’s House

Grandma’s House

by Amanda Silvers

 

I come from an ample extended family who, when I was younger, all got together to celebrate holidays, birthdays, weddings – any excuse for a party.

The winter holidays were always a frenzy of commotion, with 30-40 people taking part. The children were abundant: my mother had six, my aunt had four and my uncle had five. In addition there were other cousins, aunts, uncles, step siblings, ex-husbands, great aunts and second and third cousins.

My family, particularly my grandmother on my mother’s side, at whose household we held the holiday celebrations, enjoyed many traditions and superstitions about all sorts of things, especially Christmas and the New Year.

For instance, she said: if you don’t hang mistletoe above your front door, you’ll have bad luck. And if you do not kiss the person standing under the mistletoe, people will gossip about you. If you stand beneath the mistletoe and no one kisses you, you will not have a lover for a year.

If an unattached young man wanted to date a young woman, he could begin with a kiss under the mistletoe, and all would know his intentions were honorable. You were then considered an “item” and it was regarded almost an engagement.

The mistletoe customs were a fun and enlivening part of our holiday festivities; even when we were very young, we plotted when to get under it – trying to get the object of our desire to kiss us. This very seldom worked, because most of the time our dad or grandpa or some equally boring adult would kiss us before the inept young men got up the nerve.

Another great kissing practice is the “friendship ball,” generally made with a lemon, orange or lime and studded in some interesting and attractive manner with whole cloves.

The idea is to offer the ball to a person that you want to kiss, who then takes it, pulls out a clove with their teeth, chews it and then kisses the person who gave it to them. Then the one with the ball has the option to return it to the person that initially gave it to them, with another kiss, of course or to pass it on to another person and kiss them.

If someone offered you the kissing ball and you refused to kiss them, no one else would offer you one for the rest of the evening.

This game was fun, but more than a few conflicts were initiated when people had a tiny bit too much to drink and an individual kissed someone else’s wife or husband a few too many times or too passionately. The sparring individuals would ordinarily leave in a huff over that, but the kids found it a perfect way to emulate the “adult game” of kissing.

The New Year’s customs were regarded even more earnestly, if that were possible. We always had a special meal on New Year’s day, a sumptuous, extravagant meal, said to insure that we’d eat well the rest of the year. We toasted in the New Year together, as a family, lest one of us die during the year. We, even the kids, had champagne with strawberries, said to please the small folk into aiding us in accomplishing our desires. We toasted one another’s health, prosperity, good nature, marriage, etc. To shower good wishes on one another was necessary to insure that we’d prosper during the coming year. It has only been in the last few years that I no longer call my whole family long distance on New Year’s eve to carry on the tradition, it was that strongly ingrained in me.

More customs included that the last person to finish the meal on New Year’s day was going to get fat, or have a baby, depending on whether it was a man or woman. The first person to leave the house on New Year’s Day was supposed to kiss everyone in the house and they were to say “See ya later, alligator” before leaving the house. If one person was still asleep, or in the shower or something, the person leaving was to wait.

My grandmother, Ma Mère, was the one who was the fanatic about superstitions, and they carried over into everything, but the Christmas and New Year’s holidays customs were clearly the best. I endeavor to begin an amusing new tradition each year. You may want to use some of these or think of a festive new one for this year, and don’t forget the mistletoe!

THISTLE

Folk Names: Lady’s Thistle, Thrissles

Gender: Masculine

Planet: Mars

Element: Fire

Deities: Thor, Minerva

Powers: Strength, Protection, Healing, Exorcism, Hex-Breaking

Magickal Uses: A bowl of thistles placed in a room strengthens the spirits and renews the vitality of all within it. Carry a thistle (or part of a thistle) for energy and strength.

Grown in the garden, thistles ward off thieves; grown in a pot and on the doorstep they protect against evil. A thistle blossom carried in the pocket guards it bearer. Thrown onto a fire, thistles deflect lightning away from the house.

If you have had a spell cast against you, wear a shirt made of fibers spun and woven from the thistle to break it and any other spells. Stuff hex-breaking poppets with thistles. Thistles are strewn in homes and other building to exorcise evil.

Thistles are also used in healing spellls, and when men carry it they become better lovers. Thistles also drive out melancholy when worn or carried.

Wizards in England used to select the tallest thistle in the patch to use as a magickal wand or walking stick. To call spirits, place some thistle in boiling water remove from heat and lie or sit beside it. As the steam rises call the spirit and listen carefully; they may answer your questions.

Reference:

Cunningham’s Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs