41 Greek Gods and Goddesses: Family Tree and Fun Facts

You’re Invited to Olympus Mall Where the Greek Gods Dwell and Sell

Far away on Mount Olympus lives the… Well, the Olympians — the twelve most important Greek dieties.

In ancient times, the Olympians and the rest of their family were an important part of daily Greek culture. Each god and goddess ruled certain realms and also played their part in mythology; fascinating stories that helped ancient Greeks to grasp the world around them, including the weather, religious beliefs, and their own social system.

That being said, even the Olympian gods must earn a living.

Possessing so many powers and abilities, they all agreed that they would make excellent business owners, and so opened a grand mall and invited all the mortals.

Let’s grab a shopping bag and go explore the Greek god family tree!

Table of Contents

Zeus the Mall Manager

Suspect Infidelity? Hera’s Private Eye Business Can Help

Book a Trip at the Atlas Traveling Agency

Find Variety at Apollo’s Flea Market

The Eros Lounge for Lonely Hearts

There’s Even a Wine-Tasting Event

Stay Away From the Security Booth

Rejuvenate With Sleep Therapy to Continue Your Shopping

There’s a Shuttle Service for Tired Shoppers

Ares Runs the Army Surplus Shop

There’s a Creepy Dude on a Boat

Pan’s Pet and Sacrifice Shop

This Family’s Failing Business Sells Air Fresheners

There’s Free Counseling for Disturbed Mortals

This Hardware Shop Has All the Mist You Need

This Paramedic Will Fix Your Bones After Kratos Jumps You

The Mall Has a Mini-Jail Called Tartarus

The Cinema Shows Back-To-Back 3D Horror Movies

The Helios Car Dealership Sells Golden Bowls

The Ghost Tour Has Real Ghosts

Poseidon Runs the Black Market

Please Claim Your Kids at the Lost and Found Tent

Aphrodite’s Kissing Booth

Learn How to Chop Necks at Athena’s Karate Club

Hyperion’s Laser Tag Arena

You Can Buy Bottled Air From Aether

Alastor’s Restaurant Serves All the Revenge You Can Eat

There’s an Old Guy That Sells Answers (But You Probably Won’t Get Them)

Pick a Tour Package at the Extreme Adventure Club

There’s a God in the Mini-Jail

There’s a Celebrity Signing Photos of Himself

Enjoy Free Muffins at the Bingo Hall

You’ll Win Every Race With Nike’s Sports Equipment

The Hypno-Therapist Makes Your Problems Worse

The Water-Girl Might Knock You Out

Hecate’s Hex & Herb Shop 

The Mall’s Casino Doubles as a Human Resources Office

The Archery Range Is Fun (But Deadly If You Upset Artemis) 

The Art Gallery Is Full of Living Things and Violence

Mania Is Too Mad to Have a Business

Get Your Face Peeled by Persephone

Get Your Napalm at the Fire-Starter’s Shop

Thank You for Shopping at the Mount Olympus Mall!

Click here to more of this article from historycooperative.org

Deities Associated with Thursday – Jupiter, Roman God


Deities Associated with Thursday – Jupiter, Roman God

Jupiter, also known as Jove, is the god of sky and thunder, as well as the king of gods in Ancient Roman Mythology. Jupiter is the top god of the Roman pantheon.Jupiter was considered the chief deity of Roman state religion during the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion.

Zeus is Jupiter’s equivalent in Greek Mythology. The two share the same features and characteristics.

Due to Jupiter’s popularity, the Romans named the largest planet in the solar system after him.

Attributes
Jupiter is depicted with a beard and long hair. His other attributes include scepter, eagle, cornucopia, aegis, ram, and lion.

Jupiter, the Planet
The ancient Babylonians were the first known people to record their sightings of the planet Jupiter. The Babylonians’ recordings date back to the seventh century BC. It was initially named after Jupiter, the king of the Roman gods. To the Greeks, the planet represented Zeus, their god of thunder, while the Mesopotamians saw Jupiter as their god, Marduk.

Zeus
Jupiter and Zeus are equivalents in ancient mythology. The share the same traits and characteristics.
The Greek god Zeus was the top Olympian god in the Greek pantheon. After he took credit for rescuing his brothers and sisters from their father Cronus, Zeus became king of heaven and gave his brothers, Poseidon and Hades, the sea and the underworld, respectively, for their domains.

Zeus was the husband of Hera, but he had many affairs with other goddesses, mortal women, and female animals.
Zeus mated with, among others, Aegina, Alcmena, Calliope, Cassiopea, Demeter, Dione, Europa, Io, Leda, Leto, Mnemosyne, Niobe, and Semele.

He is king on Mount Olympus, the home of the Greek gods. He is also credited as the father of Greek heroes and the ancestor of many other Greeks. Zeus mated with many mortals and goddesses but is married to his sister Hera (Juno).

Zeus is the son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. He is the brother of his wife Hera, his other sisters Demeter and Hestia, and his brothers Hades, Poseidon.

Etymology of Zeus and Jupiter
The root of both “Zeus” and “Jupiter” is in a proto-Indo-European word for the often personified concepts of “day/light/sky”.

Zeus Abducts Mortals:
There are many myths about Zeus. Some involve demanding acceptable conduct of others, whether human or divine. Zeus was enraged with the behavior of Prometheus. The titan had tricked Zeus into taking the non-meat portion of the original sacrifice, so that mankind could enjoy the food. In response, the king of the gods deprived mankind of the use of fire so they wouldn’t be able to enjoy the boon they’d been granted, but Prometheus found a way around this, and stole some of the gods’ fire by hiding it in a stalk of fennel and then giving it to mankind. Zeus punished Prometheus with having his liver pecked out every day.

But Zeus himself misbehaves — at least according to human standards. It is tempting to say that his primary occupation is that of seducer. In order to seduce, he sometimes changed his shape into that of an animal or bird.

· When he impregnated Leda, he appeared as a swan [see Leda and the Swan].
· When he abducted Ganymede, he appeared as an eagle [see Zeus and Ganymede] in order to take Ganymede to the home of the gods where he would replace Hebe as cupbearer; and
· when Zeus carried off Europa, he appeared as a tempting white bull

— although why the Mediterranean women were so enamored of bulls is beyond the imaginative capacities of this urban-dweller — setting in motion the quest of Cadmus and the settling of Thebes. The hunt for Europa provides one mythological version of the introduction of letters to Greece.

The Olympic Games were initially held to honor Zeus.
 

Author

N.S. Gill, Ancient/Classical History Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

 

Let’s Talk Witch – The Gods

wiccan in the woods

The Gods

 

Witchy practices often focus on the goddess, especially during lunar rituals such as full moon and new moon. But let us not forget her consort, the god, the masculine half of the deity. Like the goddess, the god comes in many different forms, with many different names, and he changes shape throughout the course of the year.

We draw on the same mythological pantheons for the names we call the gods as we do for our goddesses. Greek and Roman gods are often well known (Neptune, Saturn, Pluto, Mars, and Mercury… now where have I heard those before?), as are some Celtic, Norse, and Egyptian gods (among others). Even the names of the days of the week come from the names of Norse gods, such as Thor (Thor’s day became Thursday) and Woden (Wednesday).

Zeus was the father of the Greek gods and ruled from high atop Mount Olympus. (And when they say he was the father of the gods, they aren’t kidding-the guy seriously got around.) The modern-day Olympics are based on a Greek festival that was held in his honor.

Jupiter was Zeus’s Roman counterpart, and like Zeus, he was known for throwing thunderbolts bolts at those who pissed him off. This was true of Thor as well, who was a god of justice. I guess you can figure out what happened to those who didn’t play nice … (ouch, sizzle).

Many Witches like to call on gods from the Celtic pantheon, especially Cernunnos and Herne, both of whom were usually depicted as the figure of a man with stag’s antlers. It is likely that these gods were the origin, at least in part, of the Green Man and Horned God that play such an important part in Pagan worship. We also call on the sun god Lugh, especially on Lugh- nasadh, the holiday we celebrate in his honor.

Apollo was the Greek sun god who was also a god of healing. Traditionally, the sun tended to be the domain of the gods, while the moon fell under the influence of the goddess. This may explain why the god dies during the darkest time of the year and then is reborn at Yule, when the light is beginning to return.

As with the goddess, some Witches call the god by one particular name, or many, or simply use “the god.” It is worth taking the time to explore the many myths and stories surrounding the Pagan gods. Not only are the stories interesting in their own right, but you never know when some god will pop out and call your name, informing you that from that time on, you may call him-and he will answer.

 

–Deborah Blake, Everyday Witch A to Z: An Amusing, Inspiring & Informative Guide to the Wonderful World of Witchcraft