Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Spirituality 365 Days a Year for March 10 and 11 – Herakles/Hercules

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March 10 and 11

Herakles/Hercules

This day celebrates the super-human strength of the Greek hero-God Herakles, son of Alcmene by Zeus. His many adventures included fighting a bull-headed snake to win the love of his earthly wife Deianeira. During the battle, he tore off one of the animal’s horns, which became the cornucopia. He then fought and killed the centaur Nessus, who had tried to rape her. Before Nessus died, he gave Deianeria some of his blood to put on Herakles’s tunic as a charm to keep his love. But the blood poisoned Herakles by burning him. Distressed, Herakles sacrificed himself upon Mt. Oeta. When Herakles was admitted to Mt. Olympus as a God, Zeus gave him his daughter Hebe for his wife. They had two children, Alexiares and Anicerus.

Custom Made Magick for Thursday

Spell of Relaxation
Custom Made Magick for Thursday

Well, let’s see … abundance, prosperity, and good health has been our focus for this day. Now how about a little more information and ideas for working practical magick with one of our fascinating featured deities of the day?

Juno was the Queen of Heaven. As the matriarch of the gods, she guarded over women in every aspect of their lives. Juno was thought to have renewed her virginity every year. Similar to other goddess stories, Juno was a triple goddess-a virgin who belonged to no one; a mother and woman in the prime of her life, sexual and mature; and also a crone, powerful, wise, and sometimes vengeful (as she made her husband’s many mistresses’ lives either fairly unhappy or short).

There are references to an early all-female triad of goddesses known as the Capitoline Triad. This triad consisted of Juventas, Juno, and Minerva. To the Greeks, they would have been known as Hebe, Hera, and Hecate. Ultimately the triad became Juno, Minerva, and the male Jupiter. Jupiter, another of Thursday’s gods, was Juno’s consort.

As mentioned earlier, Juno, in her aspect as Juno Moneta, was the patron and protector of the Roman mint. The coins produced at her temples were blessed by Juno and imbued with her powers of abundance and prosperity. In another of her aspects as Juno Augusta, Juno was the goddess of an abundant harvest.

In addition, another of Juno’s magickal correspondences is the semiprecious stone malachite. Malachite is a beautiful green-banded stone that was also called the “peacock stone” in Italy. The peacock was a sacred animal of Juno’s, and the magickal energies of malachite encourage health and prosperity.
 

Source

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

Deities Associated with Thursday – Jupiter, Roman God


Deities Associated with Thursday – Jupiter, Roman God

Jupiter, also known as Jove, is the god of sky and thunder, as well as the king of gods in Ancient Roman Mythology. Jupiter is the top god of the Roman pantheon.Jupiter was considered the chief deity of Roman state religion during the Republican and Imperial eras, until Christianity became the dominant religion.

Zeus is Jupiter’s equivalent in Greek Mythology. The two share the same features and characteristics.

Due to Jupiter’s popularity, the Romans named the largest planet in the solar system after him.

Attributes
Jupiter is depicted with a beard and long hair. His other attributes include scepter, eagle, cornucopia, aegis, ram, and lion.

Jupiter, the Planet
The ancient Babylonians were the first known people to record their sightings of the planet Jupiter. The Babylonians’ recordings date back to the seventh century BC. It was initially named after Jupiter, the king of the Roman gods. To the Greeks, the planet represented Zeus, their god of thunder, while the Mesopotamians saw Jupiter as their god, Marduk.

Zeus
Jupiter and Zeus are equivalents in ancient mythology. The share the same traits and characteristics.
The Greek god Zeus was the top Olympian god in the Greek pantheon. After he took credit for rescuing his brothers and sisters from their father Cronus, Zeus became king of heaven and gave his brothers, Poseidon and Hades, the sea and the underworld, respectively, for their domains.

Zeus was the husband of Hera, but he had many affairs with other goddesses, mortal women, and female animals.
Zeus mated with, among others, Aegina, Alcmena, Calliope, Cassiopea, Demeter, Dione, Europa, Io, Leda, Leto, Mnemosyne, Niobe, and Semele.

He is king on Mount Olympus, the home of the Greek gods. He is also credited as the father of Greek heroes and the ancestor of many other Greeks. Zeus mated with many mortals and goddesses but is married to his sister Hera (Juno).

Zeus is the son of the Titans Cronus and Rhea. He is the brother of his wife Hera, his other sisters Demeter and Hestia, and his brothers Hades, Poseidon.

Etymology of Zeus and Jupiter
The root of both “Zeus” and “Jupiter” is in a proto-Indo-European word for the often personified concepts of “day/light/sky”.

Zeus Abducts Mortals:
There are many myths about Zeus. Some involve demanding acceptable conduct of others, whether human or divine. Zeus was enraged with the behavior of Prometheus. The titan had tricked Zeus into taking the non-meat portion of the original sacrifice, so that mankind could enjoy the food. In response, the king of the gods deprived mankind of the use of fire so they wouldn’t be able to enjoy the boon they’d been granted, but Prometheus found a way around this, and stole some of the gods’ fire by hiding it in a stalk of fennel and then giving it to mankind. Zeus punished Prometheus with having his liver pecked out every day.

But Zeus himself misbehaves — at least according to human standards. It is tempting to say that his primary occupation is that of seducer. In order to seduce, he sometimes changed his shape into that of an animal or bird.

· When he impregnated Leda, he appeared as a swan [see Leda and the Swan].
· When he abducted Ganymede, he appeared as an eagle [see Zeus and Ganymede] in order to take Ganymede to the home of the gods where he would replace Hebe as cupbearer; and
· when Zeus carried off Europa, he appeared as a tempting white bull

— although why the Mediterranean women were so enamored of bulls is beyond the imaginative capacities of this urban-dweller — setting in motion the quest of Cadmus and the settling of Thebes. The hunt for Europa provides one mythological version of the introduction of letters to Greece.

The Olympic Games were initially held to honor Zeus.
 

Author

N.S. Gill, Ancient/Classical History Expert
Article published on & owned by About.com

 

Custom Made Magick for Thursday

FUSION WOMAN BY FABRYKING61
Custom Made Magick for Thursday

Well, let’s see … abundance, prosperity, and good health has been our focus for this day. Now how about a little more information and ideas for working practical magick with one of our fascinating featured deities of the day?

Juno was the Queen of Heaven. As the matriarch of the gods, she guarded over women in every aspect of their lives. Juno was thought to have renewed her virginity every year. Similar to other goddess stories, Juno was a triple goddess-a virgin who belonged to no one; a mother and woman in the prime of her life, sexual and mature; and also a crone, powerful, wise, and sometimes vengeful (as she made her husband’s many mistresses’ lives either fairly unhappy or short).

There are references to an early all-female triad of goddesses known as the Capitoline Triad. This triad consisted of Juventas, Juno, and Minerva. To the Greeks, they would have been known as Hebe, Hera, and Hecate. Ultimately the triad became Juno, Minerva, and the male Jupiter. Jupiter, another of Thursday’s gods, was Juno’s consort.

As mentioned earlier, Juno, in her aspect as Juno Moneta, was the patron and protector of the Roman mint. The coins produced at her temples were blessed by Juno and imbued with her powers of abundance and prosperity. In another of her aspects as Juno Augusta, Juno was the goddess of an abundant harvest.

In addition, another of Juno’s magickal correspondences is the semiprecious stone malachite. Malachite is a beautiful green-banded stone that was also called the “peacock stone” in Italy. The peacock was a sacred animal of Juno’s, and the magickal energies of malachite encourage health and prosperity.

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

Custom-made Daily Magick for Thursday

A Present From EgyptCustom-made Daily Magick for Thursday

Well, let’s see … abundance, prosperity, and good health has been our focus for this day. Now how about a little more information and ideas for working practical magick with one of our fascinating featured deities of the day?

Juno was the Queen of Heaven. As the matriarch of the gods, she guarded over women in every aspect of their lives. Juno was thought to have renewed her virginity every year. Similar to other goddess stories, Juno was a triple goddess-a virgin who belonged to no one; a mother and woman in the prime of her life, sexual and mature; and also a crone, powerful, wise, and sometimes vengeful (as she made her husband’s many mistresses’ lives either fairly unhappy or short).

There are references to an early all-female triad of goddesses known as the Capitoline Triad. This triad consisted of Juventas, Juno, and Minerva. To the Greeks, they would have been known as Hebe, Hera, and Hecate. Ultimately the triad became Juno, Minerva, and the male Jupiter. Jupiter, another of Thursday’s gods, was Juno’s consort.

As mentioned earlier, Juno, in her aspect as Juno Moneta, was the patron and protector of the Roman mint. The coins produced at her temples were blessed by Juno and imbued with her powers of abundance and prosperity. In another of her aspects as Juno Augusta, Juno was the goddess of an abundant harvest.

In addition, another of Juno’s magickal correspondences is the semiprecious stone malachite. Malachite is a beautiful green-banded stone that was also called the “peacock stone” in Italy. The peacock was a sacred animal of Juno’s, and the magickal energies of malachite encourage health and prosperity.

Book of Witchery: Spells, Charms & Correspondences for Every Day of the Week
Ellen Dugan

Deity of the Day for April 27th – Hebe, Greek Goddess of Youth

Deity of the Day


Hebe
The Greek Goddess of Youth

 

Areas of Influence: Hebe was the Goddess of youth, she personified the beautiful maiden and everlasting life.

Her name means “youth” or “prime of life.”

She was the cup bearer who served nectar to the Olympian Gods to give them immortality.

This Deity was one of Hera’s handmaidens, her job was to prepare the royal chariot.

As a servant she also prepared Are’s bath for him after a battle.

In one myth she granted a man named Iolaus his youth back for one day so he could fight his enemy Eurystheus.

There is controversy over whether Ganymede took over her position as the cup bearer or whether in fact he just represented her male counterpart.

She was one of Aphrodite’s Bridal attendants and is said to be one of three Greek Goddesses associated with marriage.

Hebe was also the Goddess of forgiveness, granting pardons to prisoners.

Origins and Genealogy: the Goddess of youth was Zeus and Hera’s youngest daughter. Her siblings were Ares and Eileithyia.

This Deity married the Hero Hercules who was made into a demi God, together they had two children Alexiares and Anicetus.

Strengths: Youthful.

Weaknesses: She has less charisma than many of the Greek Goddesses, relying on her gifts to get attention.She was also said to be clumsy.

Temples: Her most famous places of worship were an altar at Cynosarges in Athens and the sacred cypess grove on the Phliasian citadel.

Hebe’s Symbolism

Shown in art either topless or in a sleeveless dress to accentuate her youthful features.

Her ankles were often mentioned , they were described as nicely shaped or neat suggesting the health and fitness of youth.

She carried a pitcher of nectar and a cup to serve the Gods.

Plants: Lettuce as her mother became pregnant without Zeus by eating this plant. Ivy sprigs.

Roman Equivalent: Juventas

Archetype

The Maiden:

The Maiden Archetype represents purity and the innocence of childhood. Where the soul’s dreams, magic and make believe still prevail.

It is also an aspect of the triple goddess, together with the Mother and the Crone they represents the cycles of the moon and the different stages of a woman’s life.

Shadow Maiden is very self centered all, her dreams and energy is expended on achieving her own personal needs and goals.

As a symbol of everlasting youth Hebe is considered to be a Maiden Goddess despite the fact that she is married and is no longer a virgin.

 

How To Work with This Archetype

The Maiden:

The Maiden is one of your Archetypes if you are life still in touch with your childhood intuition and fantasies and have used these to fulfill your dreams. Hence you can still have this archetype at any time of life.

The Maiden reminds you to look after the magical child that lies within us all.

Shadow Maiden asks you to look at whether your dreams and aspirations are selfish and take no account of the needs of others.

 

 

Source:
The Goddess-Guide.com

Calendar of the Sun for December 14th

Calendar of the Sun

14 Yulmonath

Day of Iuventas and Hebe

Color: Red
Element: Fire
Altar: Upon cloth of red place figures of male and female youths, bedecked with flowers and candles of many colors, and two cups of spring water. Let youths from the community come forth to be blessed on this day, and process in with the folk of the House, and stand before the altar.
Offerings: Give aid to youths who have just come of age.
Daily Meal: Anything that the youths wish, within the strictures of the House.

Invocation to Iuventas and Hebe

Call: Let the children come to us who are no longer children.
Response: Let them come forth, those on the brink of manhood and womanhood.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with health, in the name of Hebe.
Response: May Hebe bless them with strong bodies and long lives.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with vitality, in the name of Iuventas.
Response: May Iuventas bless them with brightness and joy.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with minds sharp as blades.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with hearts full of courage.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with hands full of compassion.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with good judgment.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with new worlds to explore.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with faith in the Universe.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with knowledge of the Gods.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let them come forth and be blessed with peace in their souls.
Response: May they be so blessed.
Call: Let us lift up our eyes to them in hope, for they are the future.
Response: Our blessing on them all.
Call: Let us lift up our voices to Iuventas and Hebe in praise!
Response: Hail Iuventas and Hebe!

(The cups of water are poured out as a libation. The rest of Sponde is spent with the youths, teaching them and giving them what wisdom can be given in this short time.)

 

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Deity of the Day for November 23 is Hera

Deity of the Day

 

HERA

 

Hera, queen of the gods, the daughter of the Titans Cronus and Rhea, and the sister and wife of the god Zeus. Hera was the goddess of marriage and protector of married women. She was the mother of Ares, god of war; Hephaestus, god of fire; Hebe, goddess of youth; and Ilithyia, goddess of childbirth. A jealous wife, she often persecuted Zeus’s mistresses and children, especially the half- god Hercules, and was known for her vindictive nature.