The Pagan Calendar for November 9th to November 10th

Witchcraft

The Pagan Calendar for November 9th to November 10th

 

Khalkeia–Old Greek festival honoring Goddess Athena and God Hephaistos for their gifts of crafts and technology. [a/k/a Hephaistia]

 

About The Goddess Athena

Daughter of Zeus, and only by him, the Goddess Athena was not generated by any woman. She leaped from the head of Zeus, already adult, dressed with her armor. But the mother is not completely missing from the miraculous birth of Pallas Athena. According to Hesiod’s account of the weddings of Zeus, the King of the Gods chose Metis as his first wife. She was of all beings “the most knowing” (as the word metis is interpreted), or “of many counsels” as translated in the sense of the Homeric epithet polymetis. As she was about to give birth to the Goddess Athena, Zeus deceived his pregnant wife with cunning words and assimilated her into his own body. Mother Earth and Father Sky had advised him to do this so as to prevent any of his descendants from robbing him of his kingly rank. For it was destined that the most brilliant children were to be born to the Goddess Metis: first, the daughter Athena, and later a son, the future King of Gods and men. In the most ancient account, the Iliad, Athena is the Goddess of ferocious and implacable fight, but, wherever she can be found, she only is a warrior to defend the State and the native land against the enemies coming from outside. She is, above all, the Goddess of the City, the protectress of civilized life, of artesian activities, and of agriculture. She also invented the horse-bit, which, for the first time, tamed horses, allowing men to use them. She is the favorite daughter of Zeus; and that’s why he let her use his insignia: the terrible shield, the aegis and his devastating weapon, the ray. The most used expression to describe her is “the bright eyed”. She is the first of the three virgin Goddesses, also known as Maiden, Parthenos, and from this name was taken the name to the most important Temple dedicated to her, the Parthenon. In poetry she is the incarnation of Wisdom, Reason and Purity. Athens is her city; the olive tree, created by her, is her tree; the owl, is the birth consecrated to her.

 

About the God Hephaistos

Hephaistos was the Greek god of blacksmiths, sculptors, metallurgy, fire and volcanoes; thus, he is symbolized with a hammer, an anvil and a pair of tongs.

According to Homer’s epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey, he was the son of Zeus and Hera. However, Hesiod informs us that Hera bore Hephaistos alone. According to an account, after Hephaistos was born, Hera threw him from Olympus because he was crippled; he fell into the ocean and was raised by Thetis and Eurynome. Another myth has it that he once tried to protect his mother from Zeus’ advances and as a result, the father of the Gods flung him down from Olympus, which caused his physical disability; he fell on the island of Lemnos where he became a master craftsman. He was later accepted back to Olympus, and became the craftsman of the gods, creating majestic armors, shields and weapons.

He was married to Aphrodite; after he learned his wife had an affair with her brother, Ares, he devised a plan with which he humiliated both lovers to the other gods.

 

References:

The Shrine of the Goddess Athena

Greek Mythology

 

 

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My Earth, My Religion

My Earth, My Religion

Author: Chrysalys  

Though I still consider myself a novice, the Mother Earth has been the focal point of my spiritual and religious views since I can remember. I was raised in a small coal-mining town in rural southern WV where evidence of repeated acts of maliciousness were evident all around. Mining companies would take a beautiful mountainside and strip it of all the covering. The trees would be trucked away to sawmills to build more scabs upon her green skin. The rocks and soil were mutilated into mush that could easily be swept away from the scene. Great gaping holes lay uncovered in the forest splendor for all to see. Some of the wounds are still there thirty-five years later. Ponds filled with sludge from the mines dotted the landscape and in heavy rains would overflow or burst, killing not only the surrounding landscape but many human beings and animals as well. Seeing these things as a young child made a part of me dislike – even hate – progress and those who brought it. But life was only just beginning; there was much more treachery to see.

Eventually, government stepped in and required large mining companies to “make it pretty” once again. However, the once majestic views of the mountain ranges near my home were now spattered with the ever-growing menace that was society. Slowly I watched her elegant hardwoods and gracefully sloping mountains scab over with our culture’s ideas of progress. The effect was disheartening for a teenage girl seeking answers about the stirrings within. It would take 20 years to heal those scars on my soul.

I moved from my small town of less than 500 people to the large, booming metropolis of Baltimore at the age of 16. Alone and thinking that I knew everything there was to know, I started upon my search for who I really was and what life was all about. All that concrete was hard to take. The sky would look like rain for days or weeks before it would rain. The stars were hidden behind a canopy of smog and debris from the city. I was miserable here, but kept on looking for what it was that called to me. Every chance I got I went into the countryside near Baltimore. Every week there was less and less of that to go to. I felt trapped inside a concrete tomb, smothering from the lack of my beautiful sky.

I moved again, to the more suburban part of the county and then again to another county. Each move took me to “greener pastures” only to find those pastures consumed once again by progress. I became frantic at times wandering just how far humanity would take this. More and more houses. More and more cars. More and more concrete. The rainwater had nowhere to go. Streets flooded; homes were destroyed. Soon my little country town had become the city I had run from. So, I moved again…

This time we moved far out into the country (we thought) to the Eastern Panhandle of WV – the opposite end of the state where I grew up. It was lovely! Green fields with cattle, horses, gardens… These kind folks loved their countryside too and vowed to fight for it. And they have, but to no avail. The residents voted against changing the county regulations that would change zoning and make things easier for land developers from the big cities to come in and make paradise a parking lot. But the county government did it anyway. Soon, where once a 3,000-acre cattle farm, which spanned over 250 years, will be a series of housing developments, strip malls and concrete. My heart cries for her once again. How can we keep what is rightfully ours when our government doesn’t listen to the voices of it’s people? It is indeed a sad day for us all.

I try to allow for the majority who are ignorant of what they do; most are just mimicking what they have seen or heard. I suppose the most upsetting thing is having someone you know desecrate her by polluting the water, the land or the air. I have lost many who called themselves friends by standing my ground in her defense. I suppose I shall lose more before my time here is done.

As time has passed, I have come to terms (to a degree) with humanity’s progress in the world. Petitioning for understanding is a daily task for it is difficult for this 40-ish Pagan to digest. Even picking a flower or pruning a tree is a religious task for I do not want to harm any of the creatures that dwell here. The utmost care is taken in the garden, the yard, the roads… they are my temple. I feel most at home in a field or forest rather than inside a building. When I see someone littering or perhaps come upon a space that has been strewn with debris I pray that the ones who do these things will come to know the pain and disgrace that they have caused in hopes that someday these things will no longer come to pass. I often wander if perhaps some of my own misfortune is not but the law of three returning to me what I have sent. No intention of harm is sent, only the love that I have for the Mother. But I will not stop petitioning. Better that I suffer a little misfortune now and again than to have my temple destroyed.

But who am I to point a finger? I am but one of her many children who mourn all the atrocities which befall her each and every day. If there were to be only one day in which all of the bad things would stop, only one day in which no business, person, company or corporation, no government, no country could do anything to hurt my beautiful, precious Mother Earth, what would become of progress? Would the world as we know it end? Sounds like paradise to me.

Bubble, Bubble, toil and trouble… .

Blessings & Peace,

Teresa Dawn
Bluerainlady

A Spell for Protection on the 4th of July

I call  upon the Horned God and Mother  Earth,

To keep myself and my family safe as we have fun either away from or at our hearth.

To keep those who are traveling under your watchful eyes

That we might all be safe and see the fireworks or stars in the sky.

So mote it be.

Have a happy and safe 4th of July brothers and sisters.

Words Copyright 2015 Lady Beltane

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Found on Pinterest

WOTC Extra (a) – The Divine Feminine

Witchy Comments The Divine Feminine

Many Wiccans believe that the Divine is both feminine and masculine, so they venerate the Goddess and God. The Goddess is symbolized by Mother Earth. Concern for the environment and “green” practices demonstrate respect for the Goddess, who is manifest in all of nature. It’s no accident that movements honoring the Earth and the Goddess evolved simultaneously. Indeed, many Witches believe that unless Goddess energy reawakens within each of us and in the world as a whole, the planet may be destroyed.

Witches often depict the Goddess in three stages that represent the three phases of a woman’s life: maiden, mother, and crone. Celtic art illustrates this tripart nature as three interlocking pointed loops called vesica piscis, which symbolize the opening to the womb. Others show the feminine trinity as three phases of the moon: waxing, waning, and full.

The Only Book of Wiccan Spells You’ll Ever Need (The Only Book You’ll Ever Need)
Marian Singer; Trish MacGregor

A Thought for Today

Adc=vice fromk a Tree

Please remember while you are out and about to pick up trash others so carelessly used Mother Earth as a garbage can for. When my youngest granddaughter was about 3 1/2 years old she suggested we start taking a small plastic bag with us when we walk Cleo to pick up as she called “the yuck on Mom”. I had been picking up garbage along my walks anywhere I might be, even a store parking lot, and depositing it where it should go and never realized she or my children when they were young picked up on it. I am proud to say in my family we have a strong tradition of leaving most anywhere outside we might go in better shape than we found it.

If children can see the need and bend to pick up trash are not we as adults should see the need also and follow through on that need? We only get one Mother we can all help care for, love and cherish.

Blessed be

Healing Arts and Pagan Studies ~ Beltane/May Day

Beltane Comments & Graphics

Healing Arts and Pagan Studies ~ Beltane/May Day

 

May Day is the ancient festival of Beltane, the midway point between the vernal (spring) equinox and the summer solstice. The days are growing longer, coaxing the earth to open to the life-giving qualities of the sun and to bring forth every kind of fruit. Beltane is a celebration of the fertility of the earth and the fertility of our own souls. It is a call to gratitude that everything in the universe is continually being re-created, including ourselves.

The air and Earth begin to warm, Spring has arrived in full force and is making way for Summer. The leaves and grass have greened and the flowers are in full bloom (as are the allergies for some!) Man and woman begin to start their lives together, new loves are born, new lives are created.

The word “Beltane” in modern Irish means May. Beltane comes from the meaning “fire of Bel”, in which Bel is the “bright or shining one”. In his honor, the Ancient Celts set two large fires made up of nine of the sacred woods:

During this time, the herds of cattle were driven through these fires to clean off the ticks and mites and also as a symbol of purification to protect them. They were left to graze in the pastures until the new year and winter. Witches’ celebrate the fruitfulness of Mother Earth in the union between Witches’ celebrate the fruitfulness of Mother Earth in the union between Her and the young Horned God. This coupling symbolizes the new fertility of the Earth, the beginnings of Spring going into Summer.

May or Beltane, has traditionally represented the sensuality and revitalization of love-making in all living things. This is why many couples traditionally marry around this time of year. In ancient Celtic days, couples would live together for a year and a day, after which they may decide to get married or part ways. The Celts believed in the idea of marriage, but understood people and nature grow, change and sometimes move apart. This is not to say they did not believe in the family unit and still remain together as a family.

In some cultures, the May pole traditionally represented a fertility symbol – specifically a phallic symbol – dancing around it in celebration was a ritual of thanks for the time of season with which all life begins the cycle. From GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast 2002

Beltane/CetSamhain/MayDay – The first day of May is celebrated in many parts of the world. It is believed it evolved from ancient agricultural and fertility rites of spring. There are signs of the first celebrations in Egypt. However, the majority of the current traditions stem from the Roman Festival, Floralia. This was a five day festival to honor the Goddess Flora with offerings of flowers, dancing, ringing bells, May Queens and erecting a Maypole.

The May Queen would oversee crops and rule the day. Some places also selected May Kings. The crowns were typical made of twigs, leaves and flowers.

The Maypole was typically fabricated the night before. The men would strip down a birch tree and plant it in the ground; this ceremony was symbolic of fertility rites. The next day both men and women danced about the Maypole. Several longs ribbons hung from the top of the Maypole holding up a crown of colorful flowers. Each dancer held an end of one of the ribbons. The dancers alternated man and women. All the women would dance in one direction and the men danced in the other direction. The dancers would go under the first person and over the next weaving the ribbons about the tree and lowering the ring to the ground. Today this tradition is still practiced but danced mostly boys and girls.

The Celts had a similar celebration known as Beltain, Beltane, or Bealtaine which in Gaelic means “Fires of Bel” or “Bright Fires”. The ceremony honored the god of the Sun and the rebirth of the earth. Feasting, games and bonfires, began on the eve of May Day and continued through the next day with a day of bonfires and merrymaking. It was customary for couples to walk through the fires smoke or leap over the flames to insure a successful relationship. Faeries were (and are) abundant on the first day of May. Windows were decorated with flowers and food was left on the doorstep to keep the mischievous faeries out.

Those traditions created a wonderful medieval holiday that is still celebrated today. We still elect May Queens and Kings and dance around Maypoles. During this time women would wash their faces with the May Day’s morning dew believing it would bring a good complexion and everlasting beauty.

“The fair maid who, the First of May, Goes to the field at break of day And washes in the dew from the hawthorn tree, Will ever after handsome be.”

People began gathering twigs and flowers to decorate their homes and the lovely tradition of May baskets began. Children would leave baskets made from twigs and filled with flowers on their neighbor’s doorstep, knock and then hide waiting to see the expression of the lucky recipient.

From Folklore, Magic and Superstitions )0(

From: GrannyMoon’s Morning Feast Archives Coventry of Healing Arts and Pagan Studies Enroll Now!

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Courtesy of GrannyMoonsMorningFeast

Mother Earth and Sister Moon: A Beltaine Story of Creation

Mother Earth and Sister Moon: A Beltaine Story of Creation

Author: Lady Abigail 

I have always been drawn to the powers of the Earth. We call her Mother Earth, Earth Goddess, Life Giver and the Great Goddess. We have so many names for her and so many ways to see her.

My Great Grandmother would give me roots, seeds and plants to grow in my own garden each spring. She wanted to teach me to understand and respect the Earth. I loved, even as a child, digging in the dirt and seeing the worms turning in the ground letting me know winter was truly ending.

Each spring, we make a special altar outside as we cleaned the yard from winters disarray. This altar was for the Mother Goddess and to the Great Grandmother of all life. We would build a fire from the branches that had fallen and carefully pick an area that would later be made into a garden.

Once the altar was made, we placed a silver dish filled with water on it. In a wood bowl, we put bird food and corn with some of the fruit left from cellar not used during the winter. At sunset, we would set a light a candle, and give thanks to Grandfather Day and Grandmother Night for bringing life unto the Mother Earth once again.

Today we hear the term Mother Earth used for stressing the need for saving our planet. It is more than our planet; she is also our heartbeat and our survival.

My Great Grandmother was a beautiful, Native American woman. She was only a child when she would marry her husband. He was of French heritage and a Woodsman of the World. In her early years, she would live in the Deep South and later the Ozarks. She would be widowed early in life and left to raise her three children alone. She did so, with pride, honor and with no help from anyone.

Then at an age where many were deciding that they were too old and should just set in a rocking chair and wait for time to pass, she took in a 3-month-old baby. Raising that child with more love than many people ever know in a lifetime, sharing her wisdom and her traditions in ways that allowed dreams and understanding, never speaking that one might be better than the other. This was my Great Grandmother and I was that child.

I never felt I really belonged to any one people or one place. My Great Grandmother had dark hair, dark eyes and dark skin; I was a fair skinned, blond headed and green-eyed pixie child. She spoke three languages, as I worked with one and stumbled to learn another. My Great Grandmother would tell stories of her life as a child, the toils that her family struggled with to escape from captivity and start new lives. I wanted to be a part of that life, I wanted to be like her and look just like she did; but I didn’t.

It was from my Great Grandmother that I would learn that being Native American was not about how you looked, or even the blood that was in your body, it was understanding that the Earth is alive and a part of your heart and a part of who you are. Yes, the Earth is alive and so are the trees, the rocks and even the air we breathe.

As a child, my Great Grandmother would tell me wonderful stories of life, family, nature and magick. Some, like this one, were a mix of her traditions and her life. She would blend her family stories with her personal understanding of life so that I could see beyond what was put before me. The spirit within her stories would help me grow in my understanding of the magick and mysteries all around us.

This is a story of creation. A spring story that would become my Beltaine story of creation … though the time is not found within any moment of time.

In the beginning, there was no land and no water, no stars and no sky. Only a great void filled with all that could be. Living within the void was creation, not yet by name for no words had yet been spoken. Silence was the void.

Then like a whispering wind gentle on a summer night, a sound crossed the great void. Our Grandmother of the Night called to the Grandfather of the Day. “Grandfather, do you see we are alone and have no children our sky is empty and our hearts alone.”

Suddenly, Grandfather Day spoke in a deep thundering voice. “Then we shall have Children, daughters, two daughters.”

Joyfully Grandfather Day and Grandmother Night begin to dance across the great void. As they danced, the void of nothingness began to divide and become sky. Both of day and of night, separate of each other but together as one. Soon their dance of joy called to the stars and planets who also begin to spin in their dance.

As they danced Grandfather Day reached within the planets and picked what he saw as the most beautiful of planet of all. This would be his child of peace and rebirth. She was cool and green as if covered with life ready to be born.

Then, Grandmother Night reached into the stars and pulled from within the most silvery calming of light. But as she watched it she saw it was moving, she saw it was ever changing.

But there was not life, Grandmother Night called to Grandfather Day, “Where is their life, their illumination, their energy.”

Grandfather Day held out his hand with the cool and green planet within it and touched it to the small silvery planet within Grandmothers Nights hand.

With a cracking of sound and bolt of light, the small cool green planet took breath. Upon her was air to breath, water to drink, land to plant and life full of all creatures and form.

The small silvery planet held no life upon her but she dance within Grandmother Nights hand with joy. Her silvery smile was full of peace and power. Her dark face of held a calming renewal within. For what seemed like stillness was giving life and dance within the circle unto her sister as she pulled and give energy.

“Grandfather Day, ” said Grandmother Night, “I call to you to name your children and set them together within the circle dance.”

Grandfather Day thought for a moment and said, “I shall call our silvery daughter of the luminous glow, Moon, for in her changes life shall be reminded of the dance, all cycles will be renewed and reborn.”

Then Grandmother Day said, “I shall name our cool blue and green daughter, Earth; for she shall be Mother of life and death within her seasons.”

Still within the dance, Grandfather Day and Grandmother Night loving and gently placed their children, Earth and Moon, within the sky, always together, drawing energy one to the other for all time.
It was a joyful time but soon the dance slowed, and across the sky came the thunderous voice of Grandfather Day.

“Grandmother Night, now call your stars and planets to keep watch over our children, for we need rest.” Slowly they drew again into the void of existence but always watching Earth and Moon within the circle dance.

Now, each night we can look into the sky and see the planets and the stars. We can see sister Moon as she calls her sister Earth to the dance. And sometimes we can hear Grandmother Night and Grandfather Day talking to their daughters in the rolling thunder as rain cleans the sky, or in night winds song whispering through the trees, reminding us, to take care as we join in the dance of life. For if we do not take care, we can lose our place in the circle and the dance could end.

Time and the ravages of a careless world, have taken so much from the Earth. Unfortunately, many do not understand that what we are losing, is ourselves. We are here to be the protectors of the Earth, dancers within the dance. Mother Earth is not a resource of what we can take from her. She is life and we must give back to her in guardianship for her life and our future. Mother Earth is our only chance for the blessing of time itself.

My Great Grandmother would teach me to respect the Earth. For the Earth is the life giver and the mother of all things. Now as we approach the time of spring and Beltaine, as we seek the energy of renewal and the assurance of new life, may it also remind us that we must learn to walk with the Earth and not upon her.

Have a magickal Spring…

Lady Abigail
High Priestess Ravensgrove Coven
Greenfield, IN

Copyright: Copyright © 04092008
Lady Abigail
High Priestess Ravensgrove Coven
Greenfield, IN

Earth Day 2015

Remember to give thanks to Mother Earth today and every day for all she gives to us. When you go for a walk take a small bag with you and pick up trash you come across and then throw the bag away or separate the recyclables properly when you get home.

Earth-Quotes-6

What are you ideas for helping Earth to become more beautiful once more and able to sustain a better quality of life for generations to come?

Do Pagans Celebrate Earth Day?

Do Pagans Celebrate Earth Day?

By , About.com

 

Question: Do Pagans Celebrate Earth Day?

I know that there are eight Pagan sabbats during the year, as well as a bunch of Esbats, but I also notice you’ve got Earth Day on the calendar. Is Earth Day even a Pagan or Wiccan holiday?

Answer:

Well, no, it’s not, but then again neither is Tartan Day or the anniversary of Bewitched, but those are on the calendar too. It’s important to note, however, that many Pagans and Wiccans view the environment as something really important. Although it’s not an “official” Pagan or Wiccan holiday, if you’ve sworn to be a steward of our planet, then Earth Day is as good a reason as any other to honor Mother Earth.

The first Earth Day celebration was held in 1970, and sponsored by the Earth Day Network. This annual celebration is a time when people worldwide honor our planet and (hopefully) take a few minutes to try to make a difference in the world.

Some things you can do to make a difference in your own space? Try one of the following:

  • Turn off the lights you’re not using
  • Pick up some garbage that isn’t yours
  • Ride a bike to work instead of driving
  • Plant a tree
  • Use cloth grocery bags instead of paper or plastic
  • Recycle your stuff
  • Plant a garden of your own, or buy from local growers
  • Build a birdhouse
  • Adopt a stream
  • Shut off appliances that don’t have to be on all the time

Regardless of how you observe this day, even if it’s just for a few minutes, take the time to thank the earth for her gifts, and take a moment to be glad we’re part of it.

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – March 19

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – March 19

“There’s a deep wound in people-that they have been so cut off from the source of their being, their mother, their Earth Mother.”

–Francis Story Talbott II (Medicine Story), WAMPANOAG

When we are connected to the Earth Mother, or when we are clear on our purpose, we will feel connected and safe. We will feel love. When we are disconnected from the Earth Mother, or we don’t know who we are or why we are, we will feel pain. It will be similar to a little child who has lost its Mother. We will hurt inside-we will be wounded within. If this happens to the whole community, the people will be very sad and lost. It will seem like there is death in the air. When this happens, it is time for ceremony and reconnection to God and Mother Earth. This is the time of prayer.

Great Mystery, today, help me to stay connected to the Earth and to You, my Creator.