Magickal Goody of the Day for July 14th – Calendula/ Marigold Healing Salve

Magickal Goody of the Day

witch potion 001

Calendula/ Marigold Healing Salve

Used externally for burns and irradiated skin, bruises, soreness, and skin ulcers. I love to use it for cracked, dry skin, eczema, diaper rash, and garden hands. It can help reduce bleeding and is wonderful for sore nipples and varicose veins! In other words, this salve is good for almost everything! And is a must-have in my healing cupboard.

3 cups dried calendula/ marigold petals
1 cup extra virgin olive oil, grape seed oil, or almond oil
2 ounces grated beeswax or beeswax pastilles
Optional: frankincense essential oil, 5 drops; tea tree oil, 5 drops
Cheesecloth
Heavy pot
Spoon
Measuring cup
Rubber band

Heat flowers in oil to a simmer (about 20 minutes).

Let the oil flower mixture set over night (the longer it sets, the stronger the salve).
Next, using cheese cloth over a clean cup or jar, strain the oil flower mixture (you will now have a lovely golden infusion).

In a double boiler, heat oil infusion and grated beeswax until melted and pour into clean jars and let cool, then seal (store in a cool dark place).

Magical uses: Being an herb of the sun, calendula can be used to remove negative energy. Oil can be used to consecrate tools, and the petals can be used as part of incense for divination.

The plant can be used in any ritual to honor the sun, as part of a sacred bath, incense, or strewing herb as well as to produce a yellow dye for and altar cloths for use in sun-honoring rituals. For protection, hang garlands of calendula over entry doors to prevent evil from entering.

Farmhouse Witchcraft
Penny Parker

Herb of the Day for July 14th is Sassafras

Herb of the Day

Sassafras

 Ague tree

(Sassafras officinale) 

Bark, root


Columbus is said to have sensed the nearness of land from the strong scent of sassafras. There is an old story that tells of the scent of sassafras carried out to sea by the wind; it helped Columbus to convince his mutinous crew that land was near.                                                         

Medicinal Uses:A hot infusion of dried root bark has been used to treat rheumatism, arthritis, gout, and as a wash for skin irritations, eczema, acne, and ulcers. Tea of the bark of the root was used by old timers as a spring tonic, to cleanse the blood. Good to flavor other herbs that have a disagreeable taste. Will relieve gas, ague, and colic. Taken warm, it is remedy for spasms. Good wash for inflamed eyes. Oil of sassafras is good for the toothache. Used as a wash, good for varicose ulcers. The bark of the roots contains a volatile oil that has anodyne and antiseptic properties.  The powdered leaves are used in Louisiana to thicken soup.

Sassafras should be avoided by women who are pregnant or breast-feeding.

Magickal uses: Sassafras is added to prosperity incenses. Carry it in the purse or wallet for this reason. It is also added to spells and sachets for healing.

Properties: Aromatic, stimulant, alterative, diaphoretic, diuretic, antiseptic. Contains a volatile oil, resin, wax, camphor, fatty matter, albumen, starch, gum, lignin, tannic acid, salts, and a decomposition product of tannic acid known as sassafrid.

Growth: Sassafras officinale is a small tree with green twigs and large simple or lobed leaves. It grows to 40 ft tall and10 in. in diameter with a narrow crown. The bark is thick, gray to brown, deeply furrowed. The twigs are thin, usually greenish, smooth, glabrous. The buds are rounded, greenish, covered with four scales. The leaves are variable, entire or with 2 or 3 lobes, elliptical in outline, 3-5 in long and 1.6-4 in. wide, shiny green above and paler below. The flowers are small, yellowish green, clustered at end of leafless twigs in early spring. The fruits are elliptical blue-black berries about 0.4 in. long in a red cup on a long red stalk, ripening in Fall. Sassafras is native to about the eastern half of the U. S. It is found scattered in upland and bottomland forests, often forming thickets in abandoned fields and other disturbed areas.

Take no more than a week at a time.

Infusion: steep 1 tsp. bark of root in 1 cup of water. Take 1 cup per day.

Tincture: A dose is 15 to 30 drops.

I personally place a large root in a large pot of water and boil until the water has become dark red. I then sweeten it to taste.  (Crick)
Reference
Author: Crick

Herb of the Day for June 23rd is Gingko

Herb of the Day

Gingko

Maidenhair Tree


The name “Gingko” comes from the Chinese, meaning  “silver fruit” or “white nuts.”                                                                         
Medicinal Uses: Gingko Biloba is used to treat memory loss and difficulties, and is used to treat head injuries. It is also used to treat tinnitus, circulatory problems, strengthening the cardiac system, impotence, asthma, allergies that affect breathing, and Alzheimer’s disease, in its early stages. Its properties enable the opening of the smaller veins, helping to improve circulation to all organs and especially the heart.          
                                                          
Ginkgo biloba expels mucus from bronchioles and lungs, stops wheezing, inhibits cough, stops leucorrhea, regulates urination, stops spermatorrhea. The ripe fruit, having been macerated in sesame oil for 100 days, has been successfully used in China for the treatment of tuberculosis. The 24 to 1 extract of the leaf is now a popular herbal product for a wide variety of vascular problems especially increasing vascular circulation to the brain for the treatment of dementia and possibly Alzheimer’s disease.    
                                                                                             
It improves memory loss, brain function, cerebral and peripheral circulation, oxygenation, and blood flow. Relieves signs of senility, phlebitis, depression. Good for vertigo and tinnitus, asthma, Alzheimer’s disease, allergies, coughs, colds, flu, inflammations, hemorrhoids, positive effect on the vascular system, increases blood flow to the brain and lower extremities, heart and kidney disorders, and glucose utilization.

Magickal uses:  Gingko is held or carried to help improve the memory. A mild tea prior to bedtime will help to remember dreams during sleep.

Properties: Seeds: astringent, expectorant, sedative, antitussive, anti-fungal, antibacterial. Leaves: relax blood vessels, circulatory stimulant. Contains ginkgolides and heterosides, volatile oil tannins, and resin.

Growth: The Gingko Biloba tree is a remnant of prehistoric times. It grows 50 to 70 feet tall. It prefers temperate areas with moist soils, and needs full sun and high humidity. The tree has attractive, fan shaped foliage and can grow to about 35 feet in twenty years. It is dioecious, meaning there are male and female plants. The female plant produces a bad smelling fruit, which contains a delicious nut that is a gourmet treat in China. The seeds are yellow. Native to China and Japan and closely related to conifers. Cultivated in the United States.
Reference
Author: Crick

Herb of the Day for June 21 is Calendula

Herb of the Day

Calendula


                                                              (Calendula officinalis) flowers, leaves


Medicinal Uses: An infusion of the petals used as lotion for skin cleansing and softening.
It is usually combined with chamomile and comfrey for a soothing ointment in cases of skin
problems, burns, cuts, insect bites, stings and bruises. Calendula is said to strengthen and
comfort the heart and aid in digestion. The flowers are used in infusion form as a wash for
red eye. The flowers are also used for hair rinse, and in a herbal bath for stimulation to aid
circulation and sooth skin.  
                                                                                                              
The petals or leaves can be used in a tea to induce sweating, promote menstruation, increase urination, relieve stomach cramps, indigestion and stomachaches, and for relief from flu and fevers.  
For bee stings, rub the fresh flowers directly on the sting to relieve the pain.

Do not use Calendula while pregnant.

Magickal uses: A masculine herb that is ruled by the Sun. The associated element is Fire. Wear a fresh marigold to court to help win a case. Place in your mattress for prophetic dreams. Add to bath water to increase confidence. Sprinkle around the bed to protect a person from evil and to bring greater understanding of dreams.

Properties: Antiseptic, anti-inflammatory, healing, anti-fungal and soothing.

Growth: Calendulas have been grown as garden plants for many years throughout North America and Europe. Calendula is a annual that requires warm temperatures and full sun. It has hairy leaves and golden-orange flowers, and has a long flowering period.

Infusion: Combine 1 to 2 tsp fresh or dried flowers with 1/2 C. water just off the boil; steep 5 to 10 minutes; strain. Used as a compress will soothe tired eyes.

Tincture: Soak a handful of flowers in 1 pint of whiskey for 5 to 6 weeks; dose is 5 to 20 drops.

Oil: Put 1 C. sweet almond oil and 1 oz. calendula petals in a jar; place in a sunny spot for 4 weeks then heat oil till petals are crisp; strain and bottle.

Salve/Ointment:  Boil 1 oz. dried flowers or leaves (or 1 tsp fresh plant juice) with 1 oz of Lard; OR; slowly heat 4 oz. white petroleum jelly in top of double boiler till melted; add 1 oz. crushed herb and simmer 20 minutes; strain into little pots; cover when cold.

Reference

Author: Crick

101 Essential Oil Uses – Natural Remedies

Essential oils have been used for thousands of years in various cultures for medicinal and health purposes. Essential oil uses range from aromatherapy, household cleaning products, personal beauty care, and natural medicine treatments.

The particles in essential oils come from distilling or extracting the different parts of plants, including the flowers, leaves, bark, roots, resin and peels. In ancient times, Jews and Egyptians made essential oils by soaking the plants in oil and then filtering the oil through a linen bag.

Essential oil benefits come from their antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties. These healing oils are rapidly growing in popularity because they act as natural medicine without any side effects. Ready to harness the power of the world’s most proven therapeutic compounds? In this list, Dr. Axe talks about 101 ways to use these amazing essential oils.

As Natural Remedies

essential oil uses
essential oil natural remedies

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Herb of the Day for June 12th is Hemlock *Poisonous*

Herb of the Day

Hemlock       


                                                                                                                                               
Socrates drank the juice of poisonous hemlock in order to commit suicide.                                                                   

Medicinal Uses: The whole plant has been used as a traditional folk cancer remedy, narcotic, sedative, analgesic, spasmolytic, anti-aphrodisiac. Hemlock has been used as an antidote for strychnine poisoning. The antidotes for Hemlock are emetics of zinc, castor oil, mustard, tannic acid and stimulants such as coffee.

Poison hemlock is a deadly poison. Ingestion can be lethal. Contact can cause dermatitis; juice is highly toxic. The young poison hemlock plant closely resembles Osha root.

Magickal uses: Once used to induce astral projections and to destroy sexual drives. Rub the juice (be sure to protect your hands) onto magickal knives and swords to empower and purify them before use. Hemlock is ruled by Saturn and associated with the Goddess Hecate.

Properties: astringent, diaphoretic, diuretic. Contains the poison alkaloid, coniine, conhydrine and methyl-coniine.

Growth: A species of evergreen plant; the volatile oil extracted from dried, unripe fruit of Conium maculatum, poison hemlock or a poison made from the hemlock. A European plant with compound umbels of small, white flowers and finely divided leaves. A branched perennial, 2-6 feet tall. Stems are hollow, grooved; purple-spotted. Leaves are carrot-like, but in overall outline more like an equilateral triangle, and with more divisions; leaves ill-scented when bruised. Leafstalks are hairless. Flowers are white, in umbels; May to August. Similar in appearance to caraway, valerian, Queen Anne’s lace, wild carrot, etc. Care should be taken in identifying the hemlock plant; Poison Hemlock is found in waste ground in most of the United States. A good way to distinguish the plant is by the fetid mouse-like smell it emits and by the dark purplish spots that pepper the stem.
Source
Author: Crick

Herb of the Day for June 6th is Bay

Herb of the Day

Bay

Bay Laurel,  Noble Laurel, Roman Laurel, Sweet Bay    


The leaves, berries and oil have excitant and narcotic properties. Bay is  well known for it’s ability to relieve the aches and pains associated with rheumatism, and for sprains, bruises, and skin rashes.  Distill an oil from the leaves and rub on the affected areas, or make an ointment to rub into affected areas. Heat leaves in a little olive oil to make a bay oil salve for arthritis and aches.                                                                                                                       
Used externally as a poultice on the chest for bronchitis and coughs. The Berries have are considered useful in the for suppressed menstruation and womb problems, as well as being taken during childbirth when the delivery is imminent to help expel afterbirth. Lesser doses are diaphoretic while large doses are emetic.

Magickal Uses: The leaves are burned to enhance psychic powers and to produce visions. Place beneath the pillow for prophetic dreams and inhale for visions. Worn in an amulet, it will provide protection from evil and negativity. The leaves are used as decorations during the Yule season, and placed in your window it will protect against lightning striking your house. Write a wish on a bay leaf and then burn it if you want the wish to come true. Sprinkling the crushed leaves in your cupboards will keep out cockroaches and other insect pests. To ensure lasting love, a couple should break a twig off the tree, then break the twig in two and each keep a half. If worn during competition, it gives strength to those in wrestling and athletic sport.

Properties: Astringent, bitter, carminative, diuretic, emetic, emmenogogue, narcotic, nervine, aromatic, stimulant, digestive aid, locally antiseptic, antiparasitic, expectorant. Contains parthenolides. The plant also contains tannic acid and bitters.         

Growth: A slow growing, pyramidal, perennial evergreen tree native to the Mediterranean region and Asia Minorwhich can reach a height of 40 to 60 feet. The bark is smooth and olive green to a reddish hue. The evergreen leaves are smooth, shiny, dark, aromatic, and alternate with short stalks and lanceolate 3 to 4 inches long, the margin being smooth and wavy. The flowers are inconspicuous, small, creamy yellow, having no petals, unisexual, composed of 4-lobed calyxes which are greenish-yellow in small umbels from the leaf axils. One-seeded fruit is purple to black, but when dried the berries (1/2″ diameter) are black and aromatic.
Reference:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods