Your Charm for Tuesday, Jan. 21 is The Hei Tiki

Your Charm for Today

The Hei Tiki

Today’s Meaning:

Now is an ideal time to learn. Your mind is particularly keen at this time for the study of witchcraft, divination and esoteric subjects. Knowledge affects this aspect.

General Description:   

The Hei Tiki amulet is used by the Maoris of New Zealand. It is carved in jade, the sacred stone of the natives. Worn as a neck ornament for good luck, and to protect from witchcraft and evil spirits. These charms are regarded as valuable heirlooms, and are carefully handed down from father to son, as the talisman was believed to possess all the good qualities and virtues of their forefathers. The Hei Tiki is a curious and distorted representation of the human figure in the attitude of listening, the head leaning on the shoulder.

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Your Animal Spirit for Nov. 13th is The Opossum

Your Animal Spirit for Today
November 13, 2013

Opossum

You’ve heard the expression “playing possum”? It means to play dead and is derived from Opossum’s ability to act in whatever way the situation demands. If it’s practical to play dead, so be it; if it’s to Opossum’s advantage to be aggressive, watch out! Take your cue from this master actor today—and play the role that will serve you best.

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’ for November 1st

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

Leave yourself a choice. It is a sorry state of affairs when a person’s life becomes so regimented that it is impossible to make even one change in plans. There is a story about a gentleman who kept a record in minute detail of his living and every cent he earned so that he could make a trip abroad. The record keeping became such an obsession that when he could make the trip he took along crackers to keep from eating in the dining room aboard ship. The journey was nearly over before he discovered the price of his meals was included in the fare.

How much do we miss by refusing to accept the bounty of choices? “If only” and “I wish” are so over used. We bind ourselves daily by refusing to recognize the volume of opportunities open to each of us. All of life is not free, but there is much available for our personal selection.

Dr. William S. Sadler wrote of a woman who was so orderly and systematic in her living that she inquired of her minister how to go about dying since she had never done it before. Living in a systematic world is possible, but there are limits to what we can prepare for and about which to be orderly. Daily we meet and settle many small emergencies, and some not so small. And it is our developed ability to meet these things successfully and on the spur of the moment that makes a well-rounded individual.

But the steady, uniform methods of doing things do not necessarily mean a person is ready to meet every situation in life. In fact, such living often makes change practically impossible when change is sorely needed.

Order is heaven’s first law. But order means first things first. A place for everything and everything in its place. Then, if we’ve learned how to live, we never have to worry about the art of dying gracefully.

Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

Elder’s Meditation of the Day
By White Bison, Inc., an American Indian-owned nonprofit organization. Order their many products from their web site: http://www.whitebison.org

Your Charm for November 1st is The Hei Tiki

Your Charm for Today

The Hei Tiki

Today’s Meaning:  

Now is an ideal time to learn. Your mind is particularly keen at this time for the study of witchcraft, divination and esoteric subjects. Knowledge affects this aspect.

General Description:  

The Hei Tiki amulet is used by the Maoris of New Zealand. It is carved in jade, the sacred stone of the natives. Worn as a neck ornament for good luck, and to protect from witchcraft and evil spirits. These charms are regarded as valuable heirlooms, and are carefully handed down from father to son, as the talisman was believed to possess all the good qualities and virtues of their forefathers. The Hei Tiki is a curious and distorted representation of the human figure in the attitude of listening, the head leaning on the shoulder.

Your Charm for October 22nd is The Hei Tiki

Your Charm for October 22nd

The Hei Tiki

Today’s Meaning:  

Now is an ideal time to learn. Your mind is particularly keen at this time for the study of witchcraft, divination and esoteric subjects. Knowledge affects this aspect.

General Description:  

The Hei Tiki amulet is used by the Maoris of New Zealand. It is carved in jade, the sacred stone of the natives. Worn as a neck ornament for good luck, and to protect from witchcraft and evil spirits. These charms are regarded as valuable heirlooms, and are carefully handed down from father to son, as the talisman was believed to possess all the good qualities and virtues of their forefathers. The Hei Tiki is a curious and distorted representation of the human figure in the attitude of listening, the head leaning on the shoulder.

Your Animal Spirit for August 25 is The Loon

Your Animal Spirit for Today
    August 25, 2013 

Loon

Loons mate for life, and their medicine is about loyalty, family, and deep caring for one another. If you’re experiencing a relationship fraught with power struggles, you are NOT practicing Loon medicine. If your relationship has BECOME a power struggle, Loon has appeared to remind you that this is a time of equal sharing and equal happiness. Something is amiss and Loon thinks you already know what it is.

Daily OM for July 19 – Floating Amidst the Stars

Floating Amidst the Stars

Stargazing Meditation

by Madisyn Taylor

Stargazing meditation is an easy and readily available way to connect with self and Universe.

Since the beginning of time, humans have gazed at the stars in the night sky with awe, seeking in their luminosity everything from answers to inspiration to guidance. We have emerged from our contemplations with stories of gods and goddesses, maps of the universe, astrology, astronomy, math, and art. We have worshipped, wondered, and even projected ourselves out into space in an attempt to understand their magical essence. We know more now than we ever have about what those celestial lights are, how far away they reside, and what will happen to them over time, but facts and information are still no substitute for experiencing them yourself.

Gazing at the stars is no doubt one of the earliest forms of meditation practiced by human beings, and it is readily available to this day. If you live in a city, you may have a hard time seeing the stars, but a short drive can take you far enough beyond the city lights to reveal their glory. If you live in a rural setting, all you have to do is wait for the sun to set and the night to settle to get the show of your life, every night. If you make a habit of it, you will begin to know the seasonal changes of the night sky, deepening your connection to the earth and the universe in which you live.

One of the best ways to stargaze is to lie down on a blanket so that your body can fully relax. This position allows your breath to move easily through your tranquil form as you settle down into the earth, connecting your consciousness to the sky. As you look deeply into its vastness, allowing your awareness to alternate between the pinpoints of light and the blue-black space that holds them, your breath expands and contracts your body, just as the universe expands and contracts to its own eternal rhythm. You may feel as if you are floating amidst the stars or that they are raining down upon you. You may feel peacefulness, joy, and connectedness, or any of a full range of emotions. Simply continue to breathe, experiencing the wonder of this universe and your place within it.

Today’s I Ching Hexagram for June 13 is 2: The Receptive

2: The Receptive

 

Hexagram 2

General Meaning: Great receptivity attracts exceptional results. The natural responsiveness of pure Yin energy brings about success through support and perseverance, rather than through bold action. Thus, the wise person demonstrates strength like a powerful but gentle mare. This hexagram, consisting of all yin lines, represents a power of the feminine principle no longer honored in our modern world, but such receptivity is most auspicious.

The receptive force is sensual as well as powerful, and it can be missed by too much talk and planning. When spring comes, does the grass plan to grow? This is a time to concentrate on realities rather than potentials — how to respond to a situation rather than how to direct it. A mature mare lets herself be guided, and is skilled at graceful acceptance. In a strong spiritual way, her quiet contribution is most effective and brings success.

Do not be too assertive at this time, for if you try to direct things, you are liable to become confused or alienated. Take your time. Draw strength from carefulness and you will be doubly fortunate. Focus more on feeling than on action. Be broad and deep in your attitudes so that you can accept everything that comes your way with grace and equanimity. Be receptive and spacious like the ocean; let the river of changing developments flow to you. Allow others to take the lead for now. Strive for a natural responsiveness that is based on inner strength rather than outer show.

Daily OM for Sunday, May 6th – Culling Out The Weeds

Culling Out The Weeds
Mind Over Matter

The power of the mind is a curious thing, because it is so powerful yet so difficult to control sometimes. We find ourselves thinking a certain way, knowing that this thought may be creating trouble for us yet we find it difficult to stop. For example, many people have the experience of getting sick at the same time every year or every time they go on a plane. They may even be aware that their beliefs impact their experiences, so continue to think they will get sick and then they do.

Sometimes we need to get sick in order to process something or move something through our bodies. But often we get sick, or feel exhausted, because we don’t make the effort to galvanize the power of our minds in the service of our physical health, which is one of its most important functions. We really can use it to communicate to our bodies, yet we often regard the two as separate entities that have little to do with one another.

Knowing this, we have the power to create physical health and mental health, simply by paying attention to the tapes running in our minds. Once we hear ourselves, we have the option to let that tape keep running or to make a new recording. We harness the power of the mind in our defense when we choose supportive, healing words that foster good health and high spirits. All we need to do is remember to tend the field of our mind with the attentive and loving hand of a master gardener tending her flower beds, culling out the weeds so that the blossoms may come to fruition.

Daily Motivator for March 20th – Ordinary hard work

Ordinary hard work

Achievement often appears easy in hindsight, and from the outside looking in. Yet significant achievement is not easy, and is not without considerable problems and frustrations.

It can be discouraging to look at the already-completed achievements of others, and to compare them with the challenges you now face. Keep in mind, though, that even when you can’t see the challenges that led to an achievement, they were most certainly there.

Working through difficult challenges is, in fact, what creates achievement. Just because it looks easy doesn’t mean it is.

Most of the work of achievement is done when no one is paying attention. Those who achieve, do the work even though it is difficult, demanding, tedious and far from glamorous.

More often than not, even the most impressive results come from plenty of plain old, ordinary hard work. It’s not extraordinary talent that distinguishes achievers, but rather an extraordinary level of commitment to getting the work done.

And that’s great news, because that same level of commitment is always within your reach. Choose to persist in doing the necessary work, and the achievement you seek is yours.

— Ralph Marston

The Daily Motivator

Special Kitty Of The Day for Feb. 24th

Nikkita, the Cat of the Day
Name: Nikkita
Age: Seven years old
Gender: Female
Kind: Moggie
Home: New Zealand
This is my beautiful Nikkita, one of the sweetest natured kitties you could ever get, I rescued her and her mother Ellie-Mae coming up seven years ago this year, from their owner who neglected them both and let them continually have kittens, sadly I lost Ellie just a few weeks ago to cancer, but I am so fortunate to have her baby, my sweet girl Nikkita.

Nikkita loves to snuggle under any blanket she can find, I often go to make the beds and get quite a surprise because Nikkita will have snuggled under the duvet, and you cannot even notice her there, and a favorite is hopping in to boxes. She also loves being brushed, you just have to say “come on and get a brushing” and she will run over to the cupboard where I keep her brush.

We often nick name her Squeakitta, as she has more of a squeak than a miaow. She has a ton of purssonality, and on her terms can be quite cuddly. She loves to play, and loves belly rubs. She has become a bit of a Daddy’s girl, which is so sweet as he simply adores her back.

We all reside in a little piece of paradise called Aotearoa, more commonly know as New Zealand. Nikki is of no particular breed, we down under refer to her as a moggie, and age is unknown, but at least seven years of age. She had a health scare recently, but is fine now. We think it was part of her mourning her mom, Ellie, and are glad she is still with us!

Daily Aromatherapy – Manuka Oil, New Zealand

Daily Aromatherapy – Manuka Oil, New Zealand

High leptospermemone
Botanical name Leptospermum Scoparium/OR/ New Zealand

Manuka oil gives you a good alternative to Tea tree as an anti- infections oil. The main constituents of Manuka oil are caryophyllene, geraniol, pinene, linalol and humulene

and….Leptospermone, which is very insecticidal. Manuka is anti-viral, anti-fungal and highly bactericidal across a wide spectrum. An excellent antiseptic for use on the skin
and can be used for respiratory infections and it has an anti-histamine action and is anti-allergic in most people. (test to be sure) It is an effective insecticide and the pleasant
scent makes it particularly suitable for use in air sprays or burners. It can be used in situations where the stronger and more medicinal smelling oils might not be welcome.
The scent is elusive……very sweet and ‘gentle’.
)0(
Brought to you by AromaThyme.com

A Prayer To Mother Earth

“O, Mother Eart

A Prayer To Mother Earth

“O Mother Earth, You are the earthly source of all existence.

The fruits which you bear are the source of life for the Earth peoples. 

You are always watching over Your fruits as does a mother.

May the steps which we take in life upon You be sacred and not weak.”

Oglala Sioux Prayer

Herb of the Day for July 17th is Silverweed

Herb of the Day

 

Silverweed

Botanical: Potentilla anserina (LINN.)
Family: N.O. Rosaceae

—Synonyms—Prince’s Feathers. Trailing Tansy. Wild Agrimony. Goosewort. Silvery Cinquefoil. Goose Tansy. More Grass. Wild Agrimony.
—Part Used—Herb.

The Silverweed, one of the commonest of the Potentillas, is very abundant in Great Britain and throughout the temperate regions, extending from Lapland to the Azores, and is equally at home in regions as remote as Armenia, China, New Zealand and Chile.

All soils are congenial to its growth. It spreads rapidly by means of long, creeping runners and thrives in moist situations, especially in clay, where the water is apt to stagnate, and is common by waysides, though on dusty ground it becomes much dwarfed.

It has a slender, branched root-stock, dark brown outside, which has been eaten in the Hebrides in times of scarcity.

The leaves are covered on both sides with a silky, white down of soft hairs, mostly marked on the underside, hence its English name of Silverweed. They are 2 to 5 inches long, much cut or divided, interruptedly pinnate, i.e. divided into twelve to fifteen pairs of oval, toothed leaflets along the midrib, each pair being separated by a shorter pair all the way up.

The buttercup-like flowers, in bloom from early summer till later autumn, are borne singly on long footstalks from the axils of the leaves on the slender runners. They are large, with five petals of a brilliant yellow colour and the calyx is cleft into ten divisions.

The Silverweed is a favourite food of cattle, horses, goats, pigs and geese. Only sheep decline it.

Older writers call it Argentina (Latin, argent, silver) from its appearance of frosted silver. The name Anserina (Latin, anser, a goose) was probably given it because geese were fond of it.

The generic name, Potentilla, is derived from the Latin adjective potens, powerful, in allusion to the medicinal properties of some of the species.

—Parts Used—All parts of the plant contain tannin.

In modern herbal medicine the whole herb is used, dried, for its mildly astringent and tonic action. It has an astringent taste, but no odour.

The roots, which are even more astringent, have been used, also the seeds.

The herb is gathered in June, all shrivelled, discoloured or insect-eaten leaves being rejected. Collect only in dry weather, in the morning, after the dew has been dried by the sun. Failing the convenience of a speciallyfitted drying-shed, where drying is carried on by artificial heat, drying may be done in warm, sunny weather out of doors, but in half-shade, as leaves dried in the shade retain their colour better than those dried in the sun. They may be placed on wire sieves, or wooden frames covered with wire or garden netting, at a height of about 3 or 4 feet from the ground, to ensure a current of air. The herbs must be brought indoors to a dry room or shed at night, before there is any chance of them becoming damp by dew.

For drying indoors, a warm, sunny attic may be employed, the window being left open by day, so that there is a current of air for the moist, hot air to escape; the door may also be left open. The leaves and herbs can be placed on coarse butter-cloth, stented, i.e. if hooks are placed beneath the window and on the opposite wall, the butter cloth can be attached by rings sewn on each side of it and hooked on so that it is stretched quite taut. The temperature should be from 70 degrees to 100 degrees F. Failing sun, any ordinary shed, fitted with racks and shelves can be used, provided that it is ventilated near the roof, and has a warm current of air, caused by an ordinary coke stove or anthracite stove. The important point is rapidity and the avoidance of steaming; the quicker the process of drying, the more even the colour obtained, making the product more saleable.

All dried leaves should be packed away at once in wooden or tin boxes, in a dry place, as otherwise they re-absorb about 12 per cent of moisture from the air, and are liable to become mouldy and to deteriorate in quality.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—A strong infusion of Silverweed, if used as a lotion, will check the bleeding of piles, the ordinary infusion (1 OZ. to a pint of boiling water) being meanwhile taken as a medicine.

The same infusion, sweetened with honey, constitutes an excellent gargle for sore throat. A tablespoonful of the powdered herb may also be taken every three hours.

It is also an excellent remedy for cramps in the stomach, heart and abdomen. In addition to the infusion taken internally, it is advisable to apply it to the affected parts on compresses.

On the Continent, a tablespoonful of the herb, boiled in a cup of milk, has been recommended as an effective remedy in tetanus, or lockjaw. The tea should be drunk as hot as possible. If the patient dislikes milk, boiling water may be used.

The dried and powdered leaves have been successfully administered in ague: the more astringent roots have been given in powder in doses of a scruple and upwards.

As a diuretic, Silverweed has been considered useful in gravel. Ettmueller extolled it as a specific in jaundice. Of the fresh plant, 3 OZ. or more may be taken three or four times daily.

The decoction has been used for ulcers in the mouth, relaxation of the uvula, spongy gums and for fixing loose teeth, also for toothache and preserving the gums from scurvy.

A distilled water of the herb was in earlier days much in vogue as a cosmetic for removing freckles, spots and pimples, and for restoring the complexion when sunburnt.

In Leicestershire, Silverweed fomentations were formerly used to prevent pitting by smallpox.

Salmon (1710) says:
‘It is very cold and dry in the second degree, astringent, anodyne, vulnerary and arthritic. It stops all fluxes of the bowels, even the bloody flux, also spitting, vomiting of blood, or any inward bleeding. It helps the whites in women and is profitable against ruptures in children and is good to dissipate contusions, fastens loose teeth and heals wounds or ulcers in the mouth, throat or in any part of the body, drying up old, moist, corrupt and running sores. It resists the fits of agues, is said to break the stone, and is good to cool inflammation in the eyes, as eke to take away all discolourings of the skin and to cleanse it from any kind of depredation.’

In The News……

In the news

Protests in Tahrir Square

  • The World Netball Championships conclude with Australia defeating New Zealand in the final.
  • During the Bersih 2.0 rally in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, police arrest more than 1,600 people.
  • Hundreds of thousands of protesters (pictured in Cairo) gather in cities across Egypt, demanding swift fulfillment of the goals of this year’s revolution.
  • Following a referendum, South Sudan secedes from Sudan, becoming a sovereign state.
  • Space Shuttle Atlantis launches from Kennedy Space Center on flight STS-135, the final mission of the Space Shuttle program.
  • The closure of News of the World is announced amid allegations that the British newspaper engaged in phone hacking.