Well I Believe We Have Bombarded You With Enough Info for the Day, Till tomorrow, my sweets….

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HOMEMADE SHAMPOOS, TOOTHPASTE, & DEODORANT

 

HOMEMADE SHAMPOOS, TOOTHPASTE, & DEODORANT

DIY TOILETRY RECIPES
Explore our recipes for homemade toothpaste, deodorant, shampoos, and more. Our DIY toiletry recipes are basic, relying on pantry ingredients, nothing fancy. They’re safe, natural, fun, and easy on the wallet!

We cook what we eat.  So, why not try whipping up the products that get absorbed by your skin?

So many hair and body care products are not only overpriced but also loaded with chemicals. You’ll feel better knowing what’s in the stuff that goes on your skin—and we guarantee your skin will look and feel better, too.

“Almond meal … acts as a pleasing alternative to soap at any time. It softens, cleanses, and whitens the skin.”
–The 1916 Old Farmer’s Almanac

HOMEMADE DEODORANT

One of the best deodorants is plain old baking soda. You can pat it right onto your skin or mix it with a little cornstarch for extra staying power and moisture control.

  • Take equal parts baking soda and cornstarch. It helps to add a few drops of coconut oil to make a paste.
  • Some readers say that mixing in a few drops of anti-bacterial tea tree oil makes it even more effective.

HOMEMADE TOOTHPASTE

Washing your hands with toothpaste and water will eliminate fish odor.

Even today, baking soda remains in the lead ingredient for oxidizing stains and removing plaque without removing tooth enamel. A combination of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide lifts particles caught between teeth and kills bacteria.

Do not add anything to the baking soda to make it more abrasive. You may want to add an artificial sweetener for taste (which is essentially all some of those “natural” toothpastes do), but do not add real sugar which would promote tooth decay.

  1.  “Bare-Bones” Toothpaste: Mix 1 teaspoon baking soda with ½ teaspoon hydrogen peroxide; make a paste; scoop up with your toothbrush and proceed as you normally would.
  2. “Minty” Toothpaste: Mix together 6 teaspoons of baking soda, ⅓ teaspoon salt, 4 teaspoons glycerin, and 15 drops of peppermint or wintergreen extract. Depending on how much you use at a time, this recipe is good for 15 to 20 applications and should be stored in any appropriately sized container with a snug lid.
  3. “Modern” Toothpaste: Mix baking soda with equal amount of coconut oil, creating a paste. Add an essential oil in mint or herb if desired (5 drops per tablespoon of paste). Add sea salt for taste (a dash for every two tablespoons paste).

Note: Check with your dentist before usage. The American Dental Association only accepts toothpastes containing fluoride and recommends fluoridation of community water supplies. This is a debated subject; we refer you to your respective health care provider for their professional recommendation.

EYE MAKE-UP REMOVER (SAFE AND GENTLE)

  • Save on those very expensive eye make-up removers with this recipe. Combine 1 tablespoon canola oil, 1 tablespoon castor oil, and 1 tablespoon light olive oil.
  •  For use on your entire body, put some castor oil in a little spray bottle. To maximize absorption, spray it on your skin after showering and gently rub it in while your skin is still warm and your pores are open.

HOMEMADE MOISTURIZER

  • For healthy skin, add rosemary oil to the bathwater.
  • Another age-old tradition to prevent wrinkles around the eyes is to apply a drop of castor oil around each eye before going to bed. Castor oil acts as a humectant, meaning that it attracts and retains moisture in the skin. This promotes healthier skin cell rejuvenation. Some plastic surgeons apply castor oil around an incision after surgery for this exact reason.

BATH SOAK FOR HEALTHY SKIN

Tales of the queen of Egypt, Cleopatra, tell of her beauty and her radiant skin. Her secret? Apparently she used to take frequent baths in fresh milk! Researchers now have found that the lactic acid in milk is the cause of the stunning skin. Alpha hydroxy acids help loosen dead skin and give healthy skin a deep cleansing.

  • As the tub fills, pour in two cups to one quart of fresh milk or butter milk. Fresh milk can be substituted with one cup of powdered milk. A few drops of lavender essential oil may increase the relaxing effects. Soak in the tub for at least 20 minutes and gently massage your skin with a wash cloth or a loofah to rub off all the dead skin.
  • After taking your bath, drain the tub and take a quick shower to rinse off all the milk on your body.

HOMEMADE SHAMPOO

  • Old-fashioned castile soap can also be dissolved in warm water to be used as shampoo.
  • After shampooing, rinse your hair with lemon juice to make it shine.
  • If regular shampooing with water is impossible for some reason, try mixing 1 tablespoon salt and ½ cup cornmeal in a shaker bottle. Sprinkle lightly onto hair, then brush thoroughly to get rid of dirt and oil. A combination of baby powder and cornstarch can also be used the same way.

Customize With Essential Oils

If you like your store-bought shampoo but would like to add to it a little, the essential oils that old-timers relied on for hair care really do work.

  • To nourish and moisturize, pour some shampoo or conditioner into your palm and add a few drops of cedar wood, chamomile, clary sage, lavender, rosemary, thyme, or ylang-ylang.
  • To add thickness and body, use cedar wood or clary sage.
  • To reduce oiliness, try bergamot, cedar wood, lavender, lemon, pine, rosemary, or ylang-ylang.
  • To add luster, try sweet basil, Roman chamomile, or lavender.
  • To detangle hair, use chamomile, grapefruit, marigold, passionflower, or sweet clover, and to relieve dandruff, try cedar wood, clary sage, lemon, pine, rosemary, or tea tree.

See our natural health editor’s shampoo recipe which uses only 2 ingredients!

We hope you enjoyed our DIY recipe ideas.

HOMEMADE HAIR TREATMENTS, LOTIONS, AND NAIL CARE

 

HOMEMADE HAIR TREATMENTS, LOTIONS, AND NAIL CARE

HOME SPA DAY: HAIR, SKIN, AND NAIL CARE
All-natural homemade treatments can help you not to break the bank, especially with these easy and helpful recipes for conditioner, facials, and lotions.

Throughout history, people have relied on techniques and special formulas to enhance their attractiveness. Some were based on ingredients that were found in the home or in the barnyard (think boiled calves’ feet as an ingredient in facial cream).

Some extreme makeovers include:

  • Women in ancient Rome rubbed the ashes of ground snails on their skin to get rid of dark spots, mixed soot with water and applied it to their eyebrows to darken them, and “shaved” off body hair by rubbing their skin with a pumice stone.
  • Women of the 17th century cut small star or Moon shapes from velvet or silk fabric and pasted them on their faces to cover facial scars, which were often the result of smallpox.
  • Women in the 18th and 19th centuries pasted strips of mouse fur on top of their eyebrows to enhance their allure, covered blemishes with mercury, dabbed white lead on their faces to attain a pale complexion, and ate small amounts of arsenic to brighten their skin and eyes.

Here’s an assortment of safe beauty treatments that you can make easily from items available in natural food stores or that perhaps you already have in your pantry.

HAIR CARE TREATMENTS

Aromatic Conditioner

  • 6 drops lavender essential oil
  • 6 drops bay essential oil
  • 6 drops sandalwood essential oil
  • 6 ounces warm sesame oil

Mix the oils together in a bowl until blended. Part your hair in sections, put a few drops of the blended oil on your fingertips, and massage into your scalp. Cover your head with a towel for 15 minutes, then shampoo. You may need to shampoo twice.

Herbal Conditioner

  • 1 teaspoon burdock root
  • 1 teaspoon calendula flowers
  • 1 teaspoon chamomile flowers
  • 1 teaspoon lavender flowers
  • 1 teaspoon rosemary flowers
  • 1 Tablespoon vinegar

Pour 1 pint boiling water over the herbs in a bowl and let them steep for 30 minutes. Strain the liquid into a second bowl and add the vinegar. Shampoo, rinse, then pour the conditioner on your hair. Comb the conditioner through evenly. Do not rinse.

These ingredients shouldn’t be too hard to find, so for more of a challenge, try these old-fashioned hair care treatments.

FACIALS AND WRINKLE RELAXERS

Regular cleansing removes surface dirt and oils, but facial masks clean out the toxins that are found deep in pores.

Fruit Facial

This nutrient-rich cleansing facial mask contains many of the same age-defying ingredients—such as alpha hydroxy acid (in grapes), vitamin B (in cranberries), and vitamin C (in grapefruit)—that are found in store-bought products. Gelatin, which is often used in commercial facial peels, dries and stiffens. When it is peeled off, it helps to remove dead skin and unclog pores.

  • 1 cup crushed seedless red grapes
  • 1 cup crushed fresh cranberries
  • 2 teaspoons grapefruit juice
  • 1 envelope unflavored gelatin

Mix the ingredients together in a bowl until they form a paste. Cover and refrigerate for 45 minutes to let the mixture thicken. Remove from the refrigerator and let warm to room temperature. Spread the mixture on washed, dry skin. Avoid the area around the eyes. Sit or lie down for 15 minutes, then rinse off with warm water.

Chickpea Facial

Use Kasturi turmeric because regular turmeric can temporarily stain the skin.

  • ¼ cup chickpea flour
  • ¼ cup Kasturi turmeric powder
  • yogurt, as needed

In a small bowl, mix the chickpea flour and turmeric. Store the mixture in an airtight bottle. When ready to use, place a teaspoon of the mixture in a small bowl and add enough yogurt to make a paste. Apply the paste evenly to the face and leave on until it dries, about 10 to 15 minutes. Wash off with warm water.

Wrinkle Relaxer

  • 6 to 8 green seedless grapes

Wash the grapes, then cut them in half. Gently massage each half onto the face and neck. Let dry for 20 minutes, then rinse off and pat dry. Repeat every day, or as needed.

SCRUBS AND TONERS

Walnut Scrub

Get rid of rough patches on your hands, feet, and elbows! The oil in the walnuts provides gentle exfoliation and the olive oil adds extra moisture. The honey helps to seal the moisture into the skin.

  • ¼ cup shelled walnuts
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon honey

Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor and pulse until the mixture is reduced to fine particles. Gently rub on hands, feet, or elbows for several minutes. Rinse with warm water.

Coffee Scrub

Coffee grounds work to help diminish cellulite and varicose veins, in addition to improving circulation and smoothing the skin’s texture.

  • 2 cups used coffee grounds
  • ½ cup sugar or sea salt
  • ⅔ Tablespoon unscented massage oil

Mix all of the ingredients in a large bowl. Massage gently on the skin, then rinse with warm water.

Citrus Splash Toner

For oily skin.

  • 1 cup water
  • ⅔ cup witch hazel
  • ½ cup lemon juice

Mix all of the ingredients in a bowl and apply to the face, using a cotton ball. Store the remaining mixture in a jar. Shake before using again.

Herbal Splash Toner

For normal or dry skin.

  • 1 cup boiling water
  • ½ cup parsley

Chop the parsley and place in a small bowl. Pour the water over the parsley and let it cool. Strain the liquid into a jar. Apply to the face, using a cotton ball.

NAIL LOTIONS

Cuticle Massage

  • 5 red seedless grapes
  • 1 Tablespoon sugar

Wash the grapes, then slice them in half widthwise. Dip the cut side into the sugar. Using half a grape for each finger, massage the skin around each fingernail for about 30 seconds each. Wipe off the excess sugar with a soft towel, then rub hand cream onto hands and cuticles.

If your nails are extra brittle and need more help, or if you want to stop biting your nails, check out these remedies for better nail care.

Looking for some even simpler natural remedies for a spa day at home? Here are some quick and easy remedies for all your hair and skin needs and even more all-natural tips.

NATURAL REMEDIES FOR DRY HAIR, ITCHY SKIN, AND MORE

 

NATURAL REMEDIES FOR DRY HAIR, ITCHY SKIN, AND MORE

BEAT THESE COMMON PROBLEMS WITH NATURAL REMEDIES
By Margaret Boyles & Margaret Ross
If you suffer from frizzy hair, itchy skin, chapped lips, or one of many other common cosmetic issues, try these easy and time-tested natural remedies!

GENERAL ADVICE

  • First, forget the idea that drinking plenty of water will keep your skin (eyes, nasal passages, nails) moist and your hair well behaved. Dermatologists say that while drinking water is important for overall health, as far as moisturizing skin, hair, and nails are concerned, you need to add moisture from the outside and prevent it from escaping into the drier surrounding air.
  • Humidifying dry indoor air helps to provide that indoor moisture. It’s especially important if you suffer bloody noses and lots of respiratory infections. You could run an electric humidifier, but passive solutions may do the trick for you. We maintain a lot of well-watered houseplants that transpire water into the indoor air. We keep steamers going on each of our stoves that pump moisture into the air whenever the stove is running.
  • Hanging your laundry on bars indoors is another great strategy. It doesn’t take much longer to dry near the woodstove than it would in an electric dryer, and while it dries, your laundry humidifies the air around it.

GENERAL ADVICE

  • First, forget the idea that drinking plenty of water will keep your skin (eyes, nasal passages, nails) moist and your hair well behaved. Dermatologists say that while drinking water is important for overall health, as far as moisturizing skin, hair, and nails are concerned, you need to add moisture from the outside and prevent it from escaping into the drier surrounding air.
  • Humidifying dry indoor air helps to provide that indoor moisture. It’s especially important if you suffer bloody noses and lots of respiratory infections. You could run an electric humidifier, but passive solutions may do the trick for you. We maintain a lot of well-watered houseplants that transpire water into the indoor air. We keep steamers going on each of our stoves that pump moisture into the air whenever the stove is running.
  • Hanging your laundry on bars indoors is another great strategy. It doesn’t take much longer to dry near the woodstove than it would in an electric dryer, and while it dries, your laundry humidifies the air around it.

Oily Hair and Skin

  • Add one teaspoon baking soda to two ounces of your shampoo. This works as an alkali to absorb excess oil.
  • Baking soda works the same way with skin, it will absorb oil and also neutralize excess acid in your skin. Make a paste with baking soda and water.
  • Try lemon juice as an astringent facial cleanser.

Dry, Itchy Skin

  • You could use a commercial moisturizer or simply apply a thin coat of olive oil immediately after showering or bathing.
  • Dermatologists also suggest taking shorter baths or showers in warm (not hot) water. Use a mild, glycerin-based soap. And stay away from hair or skin-care products that contain any forms of alcohol, which are drying agents.
  • If you have itchy skin, try a soothing oatmeal bath.
  • For a homemade scrub, mix ground oats and honey. Rub all over your face—especially your nose. The abrasive will remove dry, scaly skin while the honey seeps in as a moisturizer. Rinse completely off and pat dry, and your skin will be glowing and baby soft. Only use this remedy once a week.
  • For superdry skin, use olive oil. Rub it in prior to a bath or shower. You may substitute peanut, sesame or sunflower oil.
  • A quart of milk in a hot bath is a luxury as well as a skin toner. It’s a trick nearly as old as time.

Puffy, Tired-Looking, Dry Eyes

  • Used teabags make excellent eye cosmetics. After being dunked (and allowed to cool slightly), drain the tea bag and place it over your closed eye (one for each) and hold it there for a few minutes. Redness, soreness, swelling and irritation will disappear like magic.
  • If you suffer from dry, scratchy, itchy, eyes, try laying a warm, moist washcloth over your closed lids for a few minutes each day.
    • This simple, effective treatment helps to liquefy the lubricating oil in glands located along the eyelids. It may take a few days, but if you use the compresses faithfully, you should experience relief.

Dry, Chapped Lips

  • To prevent cracked or chapped lips, use a lip balm and apply it often. It’s inexpensive and easy to make your own. If you make a big batch that’s a bit heavier on the olive oil, you can use your homemade balm for hands, fingernails, facial moisturizer, and (just a dab) hair conditioner, too.
  • Plain honey is an excellent remedy for chapped lips. Leave on overnight—it makes for sweet dreams!

Brittle Nails and Ragged Cuticles

  • To prevent brittle nails and ragged cuticles, use your homemade balm or a commercial conditioning agent after bathing or doing dishes. Some dermatologists suggest coating hands and nails with Vaseline or another moisturizing product and wearing cotton gloves overnight to treat dry nails and cuticles.
  • If you polish your nails, find an acetone-free polish remover, as acetone is a serious drying agent.
  • Also make sure to wear gloves or mittens when you go outside to prevent the dry winter air from drawing moisture from your hands and nails.

 

SOURCE:

I Tire Easily of Love Spells, I don’t know about you but….

On the other site I do daily posts on, I pull home remedies from The Old Farmer’s Almanac. I think some of them you just might be interested in, what’cha say? Let stop with the Love spells for a bit and go to some more useful info. I know we have a lot of older, married witches on this site and I figured you might enjoy some of these old homemade recipes and the younger ones might learn a thing or two. Which I might add are very useful tips.

So let’s give it a go. If you like them, let me know and I will put more over here.

Lady A

Spell to Establish Stability in a Relationship

Spell to Establish Stability in a Relationship


To establish stability in an otherwise unstable relationship, light a brown or green candle and some juniper, frankincense or neroli incense or oils. Picture yourself and your partner standing barefoot on grass, among green hills, embellish as you deem fit. Maintain the image of your bare feet in contact with the earth, saying: 


“(Your lover’s name), let no winds blow you away, 
let no fairy-lure tempt you, no charms ensnare you other than my own true love.” 


Then, picture green shoots rising from the ground all around you, one of them becoming an ear of corn. Take the ear of corn and grind it to powder, saying: 


“Nurture what we have grown, that we may reap it together.” 


Add to a cake, bread or biscuit mix, and feed it to your lover. Repeat as necessary.

Love Oil

Love Oil


On a Friday evening when the Moon is waxing gather a little orris root, an earthen bowl and a
quantity of pure olive oil. If you are a woman also have a vial of jasmine oil; patchouli will do for. 


Lay a pink cloth on the altar. Light pink candles. Pour the orris root into the earthen bowl, then add about half a cup of olive oil. Stir with the forefinger of your strong hand seven times clockwise. 
Now add the essential oil, no less than three drops, no more than seven. Place the bowl on the altar. Gaze into it, infusing the oil with your desire for love. Enchant it by saying: 


Love, love, love, love, love, love, love. 


Simple and to the point, right? You might want to substitute a favorite love poem or sonnet.
Pour the oil into a jar and cork it tightly. Leave in a dark place, surrounded by the pink altar cloth, for 7 days. 


Upon the next Friday night uncork the bottle, strain and then store in the same bottle until needed. 


Love oil should only be worn by its creator. 

Spell to Bring Love

Spell to Bring Love


Note: This spell is not intended to be used on someone. 


It is a general spell to be sent out to the universe, so you can find your mate. It will not make someone love you. 


Preparation:  Create an oil consisting of one eighth cup of unscented oil, mixed with enough
rose geranium and lavender to create a pleasant scent. Blend these in a clear glass jar.  Empower the oil to the cause of finding love, and then rub well into a pink candle. 


The Spell: To empower the oil, focus on the jar, and think of the feelings of love. Contentment, commitment, joy, etc. Allow this love energy to flow into the oil.


At a quiet moment, when you know you will be around long enough for the candle to burn fully, say the following prayer and light the candle. 


Oh Lady who loves us,
oh Lord who loves us well,
Please bring my true love to me,
the one of whom my dreams do tell.
Bright Lady of the heavens,
Strong Lord of the earth,
Please aid me in finding this love.
Let this harm none, let none be coerced, 

So Mote It Be.

Soul Mate Love Spell

Soul Mate Love Spell

This ritual is intended to draw a partner who is best suited to you at this time in your life, or one who is “meant” for you. It is supposedly “fail-safe”, but remember, you must take responsibility for any results and consequences.

Items You Will Need:

A clear mind and focused goal

Special paper, such as hemp, cotton, real parchment, whatever you deem special

A ritual writing instrument (the pen is mightier than the Athame) such as quill, fountain pen,
favorite ball-point, etc. In whatever color ink desired.

Moon incense

Charcoal or a small ritual fire

Timing: any time, preferably after dark during the waxing moon.

The timing is more flexible with this working for many reasons; the nature of the work,and the full moon energy contained in the moon incense which is an incense of Increase or drawing.

Reinforce your personal circle/aura and prepare for workings in your usual manner. Using the ritual pen and special paper, write words of power that will call the most perfect partner to you at this time. Do not include specific names, and avoid thinking of a specific person. If you can’t find quite the right words, use the following:

“If there be a perfect match, this work tonight will surely catch.
the perfect one who is meant to be,
shall find his/her way home to me.
In perfect love and perfect trust,
I send this out, but not from lust,
This spell will guide us to unite,
free will remains with us tonight.”

When you are finished, read over what you wrote and confirm that everything you want to
say is included. When you are certain it is as you wish, spend some time meditating on your
goal while you light your ritual fire or the charcoal. When you get “that feeling” (the one when
you know everything is right, your will is focused, you know it is certain, you know the feeling…
prepare to begin the physical aspect of the ritual. When the fire has become coals, or the
charcoal is glowing happily, read aloud your writing, repeating it 3X. As you read, or as you
come to the end of each repetition, sprinkle a small handful (about a Tablespoon) of the incense on the fire. You will want to be practiced at this for the best effect as well as safety, so make up a full recipe of it and accustom yourself to its nature prior to the rite.

Fold the paper and keep it near you for three days. Keep it under your pillow, mattress, or pinned to your night clothes (if you aren’t sky/star clad) while you sleep. After three days, light another ritual fire, repeat the verse and incense procedure and this time, burn the paper when
you are done. OR you can keep the paper in a special spell box if you use this method.

Many Witches have special containers to keep finished workings in. These are usually decorative and personalized with engravings or painting on them that echo their contents. For example, a heart shaped heartwood box with runes and magical symbols of love on it for this spell. Usually only similar spells are kept together, or each spell is kept in its own box.

Today We Are Talking Love Magick with Mike Nichols

CHARMED, I’M SURE:
The Ethics of Love Spells


‘Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.’
— Bertrand Russell

To gain the love of someone: On a night of the full moon, walk to a spot beneath your beloved’s bedroom window, and whisper his/her name three times to the nightwind.
–Ozark love spell

It seems to be an immutable law of nature. You are interviewed by a local radio or TV station, or in some local newspaper. The topic of the interview is Witchcraft or Paganism, and you spend the better part of an hour brilliantly articulating your beliefs, your devotion to Goddess and nature, the difference between Witchcraft and Satanism, and generally enlightening the public at large. The next day, you are flooded with calls. Is it people complimenting you on such a splendid interview? No. People wanting to find out more about the religion of Wicca? Huh-uh. People who are even vaguely interested in what you had to say??? Nope. Who is it? It’s people asking you to do a love spell for them!

This used to drive me nuts. I’d take a deep breath and patiently explain (for the thousandth time) why I won’t even do love spells for myself, let alone anyone else. This generally resulted in my caller becoming either angry or defensive, but seldom more enlightened. ‘But don’t you DO magic?’, they ask. ‘Only occasionally,’ I answer. ‘And aren’t most magic spells love spells?’, they persist. That was the line I really hated, because I knew they were right! At least, if you look at the table of contents of most books on magic, you’ll find more love spells than any other kind. This seems as true for the medieval grimoire as for the modern drugstore paperback.

Why? Why so many books containing so many love spells? Why such an emphasis on a kind of magic that I, personally, have always considered very negative? And to make matters even more confusing, the books that do take the trouble of dividing spells between ‘positve’ and ‘negative’ magic invariably list love spells under the first heading. After all, they would argue, love is a good thing. There can never be too much of it. Therefore, any spell that brings about love must be a GOOD spell. Never mind that the spell puts a straightjacket on another’s free will, and then drops it in cement for good measure.

And that is why I had always assumed love magic to be negative magic. Years ago, one of the first things I learned as a novice Witch was something called the Witch’s Rede, a kind of ‘golden rule’ in traditional Witchcraft. It states, ‘An it harm none, do what thou will.’ One uses this rede as a kind of ethical litmus test for a spell. If the spell brings harm to someone — anyone (including yourself!) — then don’t do it! Unfortunately, this rule contains a loophole big enough to fly a broom through. It’s commonly expressed, ‘Oh, this won’t HARM them; it’s really for their own good.’ When you hear someone say that, take cover, because something especially nasty is about to happen.

That’s why I had to develop my own version of the Witch’s Rede. Mine says that if a spell harms anyone, OR LIMITS THEIR FREEDOM OF THOUGHT OR ACTION IN ANY WAY, then consider it negative, and don’t do it. Pretty strict, you say? Perhaps. But there’s another law in Witchcraft called the Law of Threefold Return. This says that whatever power you send out, eventually comes back to you three times more powerful. So I take no chances. And love spells, of the typical make-Bobby-love-me type, definitely have an impact on another’s free will.

So why are they so common? It’s taken me years to make peace with this, but I think I finally understand. The plain truth is that most of us NEED love. Without it, our lives are empty and miserable. After our basic survival needs have been met, we must have affection and companionship for a full life. And if it will not come of its own accord, some of us may be tempted to FORCE it to come. And nothing can be as painful as loving someone who doesn’t love you back. Consequently, the most common, garden-variety spell in the world is the love spell.

Is there ever a way to do a love spell and yet stay within the parameters of the Witch’s Rede? Possibly. Some teachers have argued that if a spell doesn’t attempt to attract a SPECIFIC person into your life, but rather attempts to attract the RIGHT person, whomever that may be, then it is not negative magic. Even so, one should make sure that the spell finds people who are ‘right’ for each other — so that neither is harmed, and both are made happy.

Is there ever an excuse for the make-Bobby-love-me type of spell? Without endorsing this viewpoint, I must admit that the most cogent argument in its favor is the following: Whenever you fall in love with someone, you do everything in your power to impress them. You dress nicer, are more attentive, witty, and charming. And at the same time, you unconsciously set in motion some very powerful psychic forces. If you’ve ever walked into a room where someone has a crush on you, you know what I mean. You can FEEL it. Proponents of this school say that a love spell only takes the forces that are ALREADY there — MUST be there if you’re in love — and channels them more efficiently.

But the energy would be there just the same, whether or not you use a spell to focus it.

I won’t attempt to decide this one for you. People must arrive at their own set of ethics through their own considerations. However, I would call to your attention all the cautionary tales in folk magic about love spells gone awry. Also, if a love spell has been employed to join two people who are not naturally compatible, then one must keep pumping energy into the spell. And when one finally tires of this (and one will, because it is hard work!) then the spell will unravel amidst an emotional and psychic hurricane that will make the stormiest divorces seem calm by comparison. Not a pretty picture.

It should be noted that many spells that pass themselves off as love spells are, in reality, sex spells. Not that there’s anything surprising in that, since our most basic needs usually include sex. But I think we should be clear from the outset what kind of spell it is. And the same ethical standards used for love spells can often be applied to sex spells. Last year, the very quotable Isaac Bonewits, author of ‘Real Magic’, taught a sex magic class here at the Magick Lantern, and he tossed out the following rule of thumb: Decide what the mundane equivalent of your spell would be, and ask yourself if you could be arrested for it. For example, some spells are like sending a letter to your beloved in the mail, whereas other spells are tantamount to abduction. The former is perfectly legal and normal, whereas the latter is felonious.

One mitigating factor in your decisions may be the particular tradition of magic you follow. For example, I’ve often noticed that practitioners of Voudoun (Voodoo) and Santeria seem much more focused on the wants and needs of day-to-day living than on the abstruse ethical considerations we’ve been examining here. That’s not a value judgement — just an observation. For example, most followers of Wicca STILL don’t know how to react when a Santerian priest spills the blood of a chicken during a ritual — other than to feel pretty queasy. The ethics of one culture is not always the same as another.

And speaking of cultural traditions, another consideration is how a culture views love and sex. It has often been pointed out that in our predominant culture, love and sex are seen in very possessive terms, where the beloved is regarded as one’s personal property. If the spell uses this approach, treating a person as an object, jealously attempting to cut off all other relationships, then the ethics are seriously in doubt. However, if the spell takes a more open approach to love and sex, not attempting to limit a person’s other relationships in any way, then perhaps it is more defensible. Perhaps. Still, it might be wise to ask, Is this the kind of spell I’d want someone to cast on me?

Love spells. Whether to do them or not. If you are a practitioner of magic, I dare say you will one day be faced with the choice. If you haven’t yet, it is only a matter of time. And if the answer is yes, then which spells are ethical and which aren’t? Then you, and only you, will have to decide whether ‘All’s fair in love and war’, or whether there are other, higher, metaphysical considerations.

Document Copyright © 1988, 1998 by Mike Nichols

This document can be re-published only as long as no information is lost or changed, credit is given to the author, and it is provided or used without cost to others. Other uses of this document must be approved in writing by Mike Nichols. Revised: Thursday, April 2, 1998 c.e.