‘THINK on THESE THINGS’ for November 22

‘THINK on THESE THINGS’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler

The setting of the sun on an old year is a kind of summing up time. What have you accomplished? What were your goals? Will they be higher in the new year?

Whatever your personal plans and whatever the reasons back of them, there are common everyday kinds of people that should be kept in view. They have positive outlooks, and are best recognized when sincerely listening to a child’s words.

You will see them when they steady the elderly, you will know them by their kindness. You will not often hear their prayers as they are for their God. But you will know they are to be depended upon and that they will not tire of these things, for it is their natural role.

Think about these people when you set your plans. They are good to remember. Your success or failure depends upon these people being you.

________________________

Available online! ‘Cherokee Feast of Days’
By Joyce Sequichie Hifler.

Visit her web site to purchase the wonderful books by Joyce as gifts for yourself or for loved ones……and also for those who don’t have access to the Internet: http://www.hifler.com
Click Here to Buy her books at Amazon.com

Elder’s Meditation of the Day
By White Bison, Inc., an American Indian-owned nonprofit organization. Order their many products from their web site: http://www.whitebison.org 

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – November 22

Elder’s Meditation of the Day – November 22
“It’s the most precious thing…to know absolutely where you belong. There’s a whole emotional wrapping-around-of-you here. You see the same rock, tree, road, clouds, sun — you develop a nice kind of intimacy with the world around you. To be intimate is to grow, to learn…[it] is absolutely fulfilling. Intimacy, that’s my magic word for why I live here.”

–Tessie Maranjo, SANTA CLARA PUEBLO
Every human being, to be mentally healthy, must have the feeling of belonging. When we have a sense of belonging we can be intimate. We can feel. We can connect. If we cannot develop this feeling of belonging, then we will feel lost of disconnected. To be disconnected from life is like walking around during the day not knowing the Sun exists. To have the feelings of intimacy is warm, glowy, joyful, loving and connected. The feeling this Elder is talking about is available to everyone.
Great Spirit, let me be intimate.

November 22 – Daily Feast

November 22 – Daily Feast

Don’t let the night make you afraid. As children, our e li is (grandmother) was conservative with oil for lamps and it was a joyful time when family and friends gathered on the porch or sat on the grass and told stories after night. It was not uncommon to hear the high whine of mosquitoes. “Smudges” or small fires were laid to smoke a lot and keep the mosquitoes at bay. Someone told snake stories or ghost stories, someone sang, someone related funny tales – but the night made it possible. Shy visitors were secure; the caring and kinship melded friendships together and children finally fell asleep on comfortable laps. Neighbors drifted away; they would happily come again-when it was night.

~ Give us wisdom to guide us on the path of truth. ~

SOSE-HA-WA – SENECA

‘A Cherokee Feast of Days, Volume II’ by Joyce Sequichie Hifler

The Daily Motivator for Nov. 22 – Helping others

Helping others

Helping others helps you, at the very deepest level. Giving real value serves  to create real value in your own life.

By providing encouragement, you receive encouragement. When you teach, you  learn.

Each day is rich with opportunities for you to make a positive difference in  the lives of those around you. And it is through genuinely enriching the lives  of others that you find true richness in your own.

Right here, right now, there is a beautiful way to give of yourself, and to  make the world a better place. Choose to do so, and immediately feel the  benefits begin to manifest.

You have the chance today to change lives for the better. It’s difficult to  imagine anything that could be more fulfilling than that.

Reach out, give a hand, make a difference, and offer a kindness. The lives  you lift will most certainly include your own.

— Ralph Marston

The Daily Motivator

Daily OM for November 22nd – Emerging Courageous

Emerging Courageous
Walking through Your Fear

by Madisyn Taylor

Frequently, in walking through our fear, we discover that the strength of our fright was out of sync with reality.

The situations, activities, and individuals that frighten us remain static. Their relative intensity does not change. Fear, on the other hand, self-magnifies. It is when you are afraid and envisioning all that might go wrong that the energy underlying your fear grows. A tiny flicker of anxiety can easily develop into a terror that manifests itself physically and eventually paralyzes you into inaction. Though frequently, in walking through that fear, we discover that the strength of our fright was out of synch with reality. And we learn that doing what frightens us can lead to great blessings. Confronting your trepidation head-on will help you accept that few frightening scenarios will ever live up to the negative disasters that we sometimes play out in our minds.

Though fear is literally an evolutionary gift meant to sharpen your senses and energize you during times of great stress, it can nonetheless become a barrier that prevents you from fulfilling your potential by causing you to miss out on rewarding, life-changing experiences. During the period before you face your fear, you may have to deal with a barrage of negative thoughts and emotions. Walking through it, whether your fear is public speaking, taking part in an activity that makes you nervous, or asserting yourself when the odds are against you, may be equally as difficult. But once you have emerged unscathed on the other side, which you will, you will likely wonder why you assumed the worst in the first place. As you spend time worrying about what might happen, it’s good to know that your fear probably won’t happen at all. It may feel like a great weight has been lifted from your shoulders, and you will likely feel a sense of passionate pride. Walking through your fear can mean taking risks and can require both practice and patience. Since it is challenging to act when you are gripped with fear, start small.

Each step you take into fear will strengthen you and help you confront future fears with poise, courage, and confidence. You will also find that when you are willing to stare your fear in the face, the universe will always offer you some form of aid or support. When you see the heights of accomplishment and personal evolution you can attain when you walk through your fears, your faith in yourself will grow, allowing your next step to be easier.

Axinomancy

Axinomancy


Divination by means of a hatchet or woodcutter’s ax. This was the divinatory method by which diviners predicted the ruin of Jerusalem as described in Psalm LXXIV. However as Francois De Tour-Blanche remarked, the psalmist’s description does not tell in what manner the hatchet was used by the diviners. It can only be speculated the tool was used in either one of the two ways which the ancients used it in divining and later used in the northern countries.

 In the first method the tool was used to discover treasure. A round agate had to be procured. The head of the ax, also, had to be made red hot in a fire. The ax was positioned so that the head stood perpendicularly in the air. The agate had to be placed on the edge. If the agate did not roll off there was no treasure to be found. If it did roll off that indicated there was treasure. However, the agate must be replaced three times. If the agate rolled in the same direction each time it indicated the treasure was to be found in that direction. But, if the agate rolled in different direction each time then the treasure must be further looked for.

The second method was to detect robbers. It involved casting an ax to the ground. The head was to be downward with the handle perpendicular in the air. Those present had to dance around in a circle until the handle tottered and fell to the ground. The direction to which the handle fell indicated the direction in which the thief must be sought.
Some said this method would never work unless the ax was thrown into a round pot. De Blanche countered with the question as to how could this be done. How could a round pot be patched and sewed after an ax smashed it to pieces?

Augury

Augury


Augury is an ancient form of divination. The practice was performed in ancient Rome by priests called augurs. It entailed the interpretation of auspices, that is the movement of birds and/or the movement of animals. Also included in this form of divination was the interpretation of the significance of thunder and lightening. Those signs on the augur’s left or east side denoted a favorable outcome, while those on the right pointed to an ill-omen. This method of divination was practically unknown in ancient Mesopotamia and Palestine.

Lots of Astrampsychsu

Lots of Astrampsychsu


 

Lots of Astrampsychsu was a divinatory system probably devised in the second or third century CE and attributed to an alleged Astrampsychus the Magician. The system was popular in late Roman and early medieval times. The Lots began with ninety-two questions, the querent chooses one, and then randomly picks a number between one and ten. The chosen number is then added to the number of the question, and the sum is looked up in a table of oracular gods (in the Pagan version of the Lots) or Christian saints (in the Christian version). Each god or saint has a table of ten answers, and the randomly chosen number is used to select the correct answer.

The basic structure of the Lots resembles that of Napoleon’s Book of Fate, although the latter also draws on the divinatory art of geomancy.

Astragalomancy

Astragalomancy


 

Small bones (each associated with a particular interpretation) were cast, in this system of divination, in the manner of throwing dice. Eventually dice were utilized in the place of bones. Numbers on the dice were associated with letters to form words that had a bearing on questions asked by the diviner. Sometimes used was an associated primarily ritual of writings questions on paper and passing it through the smoke of Jupiter wood.

Aspidomancy

Aspidomancy


A little known form of divination practiced in the Indies. It was first described by the 17th century writer Pierre De Lancre. The diviner or sorcerer draws a circle in which he positions himself on a buckler (sheild) where he recites certain conjurations. He enters a trance and then falls into ecstasy. When he comes out he can tell his clients things which they want to know, or which the devil revealed to him.

Ashagalomancy

Ashagalomancy


A system of divination of casting small bones (each associated with particular interpretation). The method is similar to throwing dice. In fact, in later development of this divinatory system dice were utilized. The numbers were associated with letters which formed words related to questions put to the diviner.

In an related preliminary ritual the questions are written paper which is passed through smoke of burning juniper wood.

Arithmancy

Arithmancy


Divination by numbers (sometimes wrongly called Arithmomancy). The ancient Greeks examined the number and the values of letters in each name of two combatants. They predicted the combatant having the name of the greater value would be victorious. It was by using this science that some diviners foretold that Achilles would defeat Hector.

The Chaldeans also practiced arithmancy. They divided their alphabet into three parts, each part composed of seven letters which they attributed to the seven planets. Through this arithmetic method they made predictions based on the planets.

The Platonists and Pythagoreans were also strongly attracted to this form of divination which is similar to certain aspects of the Jewish Kabbalah.

Anthropomancy

Anthropomancy


Divination of human entrails. This horrid form of divination is very ancient. Herodotus wrote that Menelaus practiced it when detained in Egypt because of contrary winds. Because of his barbarous curiosity he sacrificed two country children in order to discover his destiny.

Also, Heligabalus practiced anthropomancy.


Julian the Apostate incorporated anthropomancy in his magical operations. He had large numbers of children killed so he could read their entrails. During his last experiment at Carra, in Mesopotamia, he enclosed himself within the Temple of the Moon, and having performed all manner of evil within, he had the Temple doors sealed and placed a guard there so no one would enter until his return. However, he was killed in battle with the Persians. When men of Julian’s successor entered the Temple at Carra they discovered a woman hanging by her hair with her liver torn out.


It is speculated that the infamous Gilles De Laval also performed such hideous species of this divination.

Amulets

Amulets


The usage of amulets seems universal stemming from the human desire for protection. The existence seems to extend from the cave dwellers to the present. As objects they come and go with fashion, taking on different designs and shapes, but their purpose remains the same. No matter how civilized a culture may be, the amulets are present.
The term amulet is derived from either the Latin word amuletum or the old atin term amoletum which means, “means of defense.” Pliny, the Roman naturalist, described three types of amulets: those which offered protection against trouble and adversity; those which provided a medical or prophylatic treatment; and substances used as medicine.


Among ancient cultures such as the Egyptians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Arabs, and Hebrews great importance was placed on the use of amulets. The Egyptians employed them everywhere. The frog protected fertility;
ankhs symbolized everlasting life and generation; the udjat, or eye, was for good health, comfort, and protection against evil; the scarab beetle was for resurrection after death and protection against evil magic. One of the most notable amulets of ancient Egypt is the Eye of Horus

.
Cylinder seals were used as amulets by the Assyrians and Babylonians. Within them were embedded semiprecious and precious stones; each stone supposedly possessed its own unique magical powers. There were various animal shaped amulets; such as, the ram for virility; and the bull for virility and strength.


The Arabs, too, had amulets protecting them against evil. Small sacks containing dust from tombs were worn. They also wore pieces of paper on which were written prayers, spells, magical names or the powerful attributes of God such as “the compassionate” and “the forgiver.”


The Hebrews wore crescent moons to ward off the
evil eye and they attached bells to their garments to ward off evil spirits.


In Africa the natives were discovered having amulets too which the Western explorers and missionaries called
fetishes. The fetish symbolized protection to the natives.
Historically the two most universal symbols of amulets have been the eye and the phallic symbols. Eyes are thought to protect against evil spirits and are found on tombs, walls, utensils, and jewelry. The phallic symbol, represented by horns and hands, is protection against the evil eye.


The names of God and magical words and numbers have generally been thought to provide protection and fashioned into amulets. These methods of gaining protection extend back to antiquity and were extremely popular during the Renaissance to the early 19th century. Accompanying these were the grimoires, books of magical instruction written for and by magicians. In magic, using the name of a deity is the same as drawing down divine power. This is the reason why portions of grimoires resemble prayer books.
The
Tetragrammation, the Hebrew personal name for God- -YHWH and pronounced Yahweh”- – , is believed to be very powerful in magic operations and has been fashioned into amulets by different spellings. It is believed to help magicians in conjuring up demons and give him protections from negative spirits.


The SATOR square
has also been fashioned into amulets. Throughout the centuries attempts have been made to decipher the squire but it still remains unintelligible. It was discovered on walls and vassals of ancient Rome. In amulet form it is considered to be protection against sorcery, poisonous air, colic, pestilence, and for protecting cow’s milk against witchcraft.


Most all cultures hold the belief that sacred religious books such as the Koran,
Torah, and Bible possess protective powers. Bits of parchment containing quotes from these books are carried in leather pouches, silver boxes, or like containers as amulets. Ancient pagans wore figurines of their gods as amulets. The remnant of this custom is still seen in the Catholic religion where some members still wear scapulars and medals of the saints.


Many pagans and witches presently wear jewelry fashioned in amuletic designs with their protective purpose in mind.

Amniomancy

Amniomancy


A form of divination practiced by using a caul, or membrane which sometimes envelopes a child’s head at birth. From inspecting the caul wise women would foretell the future of the baby. If its color is red then happy days or good fortune were ahead for the child, but if it is lead-colored then misfortune laid in the child’s path.