Yarrow Love Spell

Yarrow Love Spell

Take the leaves of the yarrow, which has qualities that comfort, heal, and protect; and tickle the inside of the nostrils, murmuring to yourself this old country charm:

Green yarrow, green yarrow,

you bear a white bow;

if you love me, love me,

my nose will bleed now;

If my love don’t love me;

it won’t bleed a drop,

if my love do love me,   ‘

twill bleed every drop.

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Arithmancy

Arithmancy


Divination by numbers (sometimes wrongly called Arithmomancy). The ancient Greeks examined the number and the values of letters in each name of two combatants. They predicted the combatant having the name of the greater value would be victorious. It was by using this science that some diviners foretold that Achilles would defeat Hector.

The Chaldeans also practiced arithmancy. They divided their alphabet into three parts, each part composed of seven letters which they attributed to the seven planets. Through this arithmetic method they made predictions based on the planets.

The Platonists and Pythagoreans were also strongly attracted to this form of divination which is similar to certain aspects of the Jewish Kabbalah.

Calendar of the Sun for August 23

Calendar of the Sun

23 Weodmonath

Vulcanalia: Day of Hephaestos

Color: Red
Element: Fire
Altar: Upon a red cloth worked with flames set four red candles, a flaming brazier, a wooden crutch, a black rock, an anvil, a hammer, and many things worked of metal.
Offering: Fish. Nail parings and hair. Make something.
Daily Meal: Pie.

Vulcanalia Invocation

Lord of volcanoes,
You who understand submerged wrath,
Help me to keep mine in check.
Lord of work,
You who understand its balm to the soul,
Help me to learn the joys of focused labor.
Lord of craft,
You whose fire tempers iron into steel,
You who understand what it is to be crippled,
Beat my will strong and straight again
That the sign of your hammer
May be imprinted in everything I make.
Lord who is the strong iron of competence
And the driving blows of manifestation,
May your hands guide us into honorable work.
Hail Vulcan Mulciber, Charmer of Fire!
Hail Vulcan Quietus; may your gift of tame fire
Stay tame enough not to harm our house!
May your flames warm us, inspire us
And never burn beyond their borders,
So long as we give you the proper respect.

(Each comes forth and places something into the brazier, be it a bit of hair or nail parings, or some of the fish, which is given as an offering because fish is normally safe from fire. Those who wish to be blessed for their crafts may give an offering of craft today, or simply kneel and contemplate the craftwork on the altar, perhaps holding it and praising Hephaistos.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

Calendar of the Moon for July 26

Calendar of the Moon

26 Tinne/Hekatombaion

Day of the Hero

Color: Red
Element: Fire
Altar: Upon a red cloth place symbols of historical and real-life heroes, and a chalice of wine.
Offerings: Give aid to someone whom you believe to be a hero.
Daily Meal: Simple travel food, such as bread and cheese.

Invocation to the Hero

Call: Hail to the wandering hero!
Response: Hail Hercules!
Call: Hail to the questing hero!
Response: Hail Theseus!
Call: Hail to the crusading hero!
Response:
Call: Hail to the tormented hero!
Response: Hail Orpheus!
Call: Hail to the warrior hero!
Response: Hail Achilles!
Call: Hail to the hero under sail!
Response: Hail Jason!
Call: Hail to the innocent hero!
Response: Hail Percival!
Call: Hail the romantic hero!
Response: Hail Lancelot!
Call: Hail to the hero pure of heart!
Response: Hail Galahad!
Call: Hail all the heroes of legend!
Response: Hail all the heroes who live today!
Call: May they bless us with courage…
Response: …Even as we bless them with immortality!

(Any who wish should stand forward and cry out the names of other heroes. Then the libation is poured for them, and tales are told of their deeds. The tales are an offering as much as anything else, so do not shirk on this point.)

[Pagan Book of Hours]

The Wicca Book of Days for April 9th – Astringent Achillen

The Wicca Book Of Days for April 9th

Astringent Achillen

One of the plants that is said to be under the rulership of Mars, also this Arien day’s planetary governor, is yarrow, or milfoil. As befits a “martial” herb, it is said to have the power to remove fear, while its Latin name Achillea millefolium, recalls the Greek hero Achilles, who healed his battlefield wounds with yarrow. This explains why its alternative common names include staunchweed, knights’ milfoil, and soldiers’ woundwort. Credited with the ability to fend off evil influences, sticks of yarrow are also traditionally used to form the hexagrams of the I Ching (Chinese Book of Changes).

A Stannch Ally

Plant some yarrow, so that should anyone in your household cuts him or herself, you have instant access to this stemmer of blood. Simply pick and bruise some leaves and then apply them to the wound, pressing down gently until the bleeding has stopped. (Chewing the leaves is also said to ease toothache).

Ajax

Ajax

by James Hunter
Ajax was the son of Telamon, king of Salamis. After Achilles, he was the mightiest of the Greek heroes in the Trojan War. 

Ajax was a huge man, head and shoulders larger than the other Greeks, enormously strong but somewhat slow of speech. In the Iliad, he is often called the “wall” or “bulwark” (herkos) of the Greeks. When Achilles had withdrawn from the fighting at Troy, it was Ajax who went forth to meet Hectorin single combat; by the time darkness fell the fight was still a stalemate, but Ajax had wounded Hector without sustaining injury himself

After Achilles’ death, Ajax competed with Odysseusfor the ownership of Achilles’ armor. Both men delivered speeches explaining their own merits, but Odysseus was by far the more eloquent and won the prize. Ajax was driven mad by his disappointment. According to one account, he vowed vengeance on the Greeks and began slaughtering cattle, mistaking them for his former comrades-in-arms. He finally committed suicide.

Ajax is often called “Telemonian Ajax” or “the greater Ajax,” to distinguish him from Ajax the Lesser the son of Oileus, who also fought for the Greeks at Troy.

Agamemnon

Agamemnon

by James Hunter
Agamemnon was the son of Atreus and the brother of Menelaus. He was the king of either Mycenae (in Homer) or of Argos (in some later accounts), and was the leader of the Greek forces during the Trojan War. He married Clytemnestra and had several children by her, including Orestes, Electra, and Iphigenia. 

When the Greeks sailed for Troy, their fleet was trapped by unfavorable winds at Aulis. The seer Calchas revealed that their misfortune was due to Agamemnon, who had boasted that he equalled Artemisin hunting; the winds would only change if Agamemnon’s daughter Iphigenia was sacrificed. Agamemnon reluctantly agreed to the sacrifice, but Artemis herself whisked Iphigenia away from the altar and substituted a deer in her place.

During the seige of Troy, Agamemnon offended the greatest of the Greek warriors, Achilles, when he took the girl Briseis from him. Achilles’ anger with Agamemnon furnished the mainspring of the plot in the Iliad. After the sack of Troy, Agamemnon acquired Cassandra, the daughter of King Priam, as his concubine, and took her home with him to Greece.

Agamemnon had an unhappy homecoming. He was either blown off course and landed in the country of Aegisthos, or he came home to his own land to find Aegisthus waiting for him. In either case, Aegisthus had become the lover of Clytemnestra, and the two together murdered Agamemnon and Cassandra shortly after their arrival. Aegisthus and Clytemnestra then ruled Agamemnon’s kingdom, but were eventually killed by Agamemnon’s son, Orestes (or by Orestes and Electra in some accounts). The homecoming of Agamemnon and its aftermath were favorite subjects for Greek tragedy.

Achilles

Achilles

by James Hunter
Achilles was the son of the mortal Peleus and the Nereid Thetis. He was the mightiest of the Greeks who fought in the Trojan War, and was the hero of Homer’s Iliad.Thetis attempted unsuccessfully to make her son immortal. There are two versions of the story. In the earlier version, Thetis anointed the infant with ambrosia and then placed him upon a fire to burn away his mortal portions; she was interrupted by Peleus, whereupon she abandoned both father and son in a rage. Peleus placed the child in the care of the Centaur Chiron, who raised and educated the boy. In the later version, she held the young Achilles by the heel and dipped him in the river Styx; everything the sacred waters touched became invulnerable, but the heel remained dry and therefore unprotected.

When Achilles was a boy, the seer Calchas prophesied that the city of Troy could not be taken without his help. Thetis knew that, if her son went to Troy, he would die an early death, so she sent him to the court of Lycomedes, in Scyros; there he was hidden, disguised as a young girl. During his stay he had an affair with Lycomedes’ daughter, Deidameia, and she had a son, Pyrrhus (or Neoptolemus), by him. Achilles’ disguise was finally penetrated by Odysseus, who placed arms and armor amidst a display of women’s finery and seized upon Achilles when he was the only “maiden” to be fascinated by the swords and shields. Achilles then went willingly with Odysseus to Troy, leading a host of his father’s Myrmidons and accompanied by his tutor Phoenix and his close friend Patroclus. At Troy, Achilles distinguished himself as an undefeatable warrior. Among his other exploits, he captured twenty-three towns in Trojan territory, including the town of Lyrnessos, where he took the woman Briseis as a war-prize. Later on Agamemnon, the leader of the Greeks, was forced by an oracle of Apollo to give up his own war-prize, the woman Chryseis, and took Briseis away from Achilles as compensation for his loss. This action sparked the central plot of the Iliad, for Achilles became enraged and refused to fight for the Greeks any further. The war went badly, and the Greeks offered handsome reparations to their greatest warrior; Achilles still refused to fight in person, but he agreed to allow his friend Patroclus to fight in his place, wearing his armor. The next day Patroclus was killed and stripped of the armor by the Trojan hero Hector, who mistook him for Achilles.

Achilles was overwhelmed with grief for his friend and rage at Hector. His mother obtained magnificent new armor for him from Hephaestus, and he returned to the fighting and killed Hector. He desecrated the body, dragging it behind his chariot before the walls of Troy, and refused to allow it to receive funeral rites. When Priam, the king of Troy and Hector’s father, came secretly into the Greek camp to plead for the body, Achilles finally relented; in one of the most moving scenes of the Iliad, he received Priam graciously and allowed him to take the body away.

After the death of Hector, Achilles’ days were numbered. He continued fighting heroically, killing many of the Trojans and their allies, including Memnon and the Amazon warrior Penthesilia. Finally Priam’s son Paris (or Alexander), aided by Apollo, wounded Achilles in the heel with an arrow; Achilles died of the wound. After his death, it was decided to award Achilles’ divinely-wrought armor to the bravest of the Greeks. Odysseus and Ajaxcompeted for the prize, with each man making a speech explaining why he deserved the honor; Odysseus won, and Ajax then went mad and committed suicide.

During his lifetime, Achilles is also said to have had a number of romantic episodes. He reportedly fell in love with Penthesilia, the Amazon maiden whom he killed in battle, and it is claimed that he married Medea.