THE MYSTERY OF FLOWERS AND PLANTS (Part 3 E-G)

Edelweiss – (courage – noble purity – daring)

Edelweiss is a European mountain flower a member of the sunflower family, it’s flowers are felted and woolly with white hairs, the characteristic bloom consists of five to six small yellow flower heads surrounded by leaflets. The name edelweiss is German, edel (noble) and weiss (white).

Fern – (shelter – discretion – secret bond of love – confidence – fascination – magic – reverie)

Ferns do not have seeds or flowers, but reproduce by spores. There are about 12,000 varieties  worldwide, and fern is derived from Old English fear, meaning “fern,” a type of leafy plant. Flower and plant names were popular in the 19th century and the name was first used then.

Forget me not (never forget me)

Forget-me-not flower symbolism the flower symbolism associated with the forget-me-not is true love and memories. In 15th century Germany, it was supposed that the wearers of the flower would not be forgotten by their lovers. In a medieval legend, a knight and his lady were walking along the side of a river. He picked a posy of flowers, but because of the weight of his armour he fell into the river. As he was drowning he threw the posy to his loved one and shouted “Forget-me-not”. It is also told in pious legend that the Christ child was sitting on Mary’s lap one day and said that he wished that future generations could see them. He touched her eyes and then waved his hand over the ground and blue forget-me-nots appeared. Forget me nots acquired the name when a knight leapt into the river Danube to get a pretty blue flower for his lady, it was floating on the water and she was sad it may be swept away by the water. Tragically the current dragged the knight down, he threw his lady the flower before he drowned, crying, “Forget me not.” The lady wore the flowers in her hair ever after to always remember him. It is said that forget me nots planted on the grave of someone you love, will never die as long as you live. Blue and pink flowers are found on the same stem, blue  for boys and pink for girls. Forget me nots are given as a symbol of remembrance.

Foxglove – (youth – stateliness)

Foxglove is symbolic of both healing and harm, foxglove flowers have both positive and negative symbolic meanings. The scientific name is digitalis, a reference to the presence of extremely powerful chemicals used to treat heart conditions when correctly administered. However if taken in large amounts it is deadly.

Fuchsia – (love)

Fuchsia flowers are a delicate teardrop shape and grow in profusion throughout summer and autumn, tropical species grow all year round. Hummingbirds are attracted to the glorious red sepals and beautiful purple petals.

Gardenia – (secret love – refinement – beauty – purity) meaning (“garden flower”)

Gardenia plants have a strong sweet scent, the flower can be very large in some species. Gardenias are native to Asia, Australasia, Oceana and Africa, they also grow in Hawaii.

Geranium – (friendship-folly-stupidity-meeting)

The temperate regions of the world and tropical mountains are where the geranium will be found. The genus name is derived from the Greek word geranos, meaning “crane”. The appearance of the geraniums seed-heads are the same shape as the bill of a crane.

Gladiolus – (strength – astounding beauty – preparedness – love at first sight)

The stem base (corms) of the gladiolus were made into a poultice for thorns and splinters and used for it’s healing properties. The name gladiolus comes from the sword or “gladius” shape leaves.  The gladiolus symbolised the Roman gladiators.

Globe Amaranth – (unfading love)

The globe amaranth is an annual plant that grows up to 24 inches in height, it is a genus of plants in the Amaranthaceae family. The true species of globe amaranth has magenta flowers, then there are garden varieties with purple, white, red, lilac and pink.

by  FROM: http://witcheslore.com/bookofshadows/herbology/the-mystery-of-flowers-and-plants/3649/

Advertisements

Herbs & Their Planetary Correspondences

Herbs & Their Planetary Correspondences

Sun

Acacia, Ash, Bay, Carnation, Cedar, Chamomile, Cimmamon, Hazel, Heliotrope, Juniper, Marigold, Misteltoe, Oak, Orange, Pam, Peony, Rice, Rosemary, Saffron, Sunflower, Tea, Walnut

Moon

   Aloe, Cotton, Dulse, Eucalyptus, Gardenia, Grape, Irish Moss, Jasmine, Lemon, Liiy, Myrrh, Poppy, Potato, Sandalwood, Willow
Mercury
    Almond, Aspen, Bittersweet, Brazil Nut, Caraway, Clover, Dill, Fennel, Fern, Flax, Lavender, Mandrake, Marjoram, Mint, Mulberry, parsley, Pecan, Senna
Venus
      Apple, Apricot, Avocado, Barley, Birch, Blackberry, Cherry, Corn, Cowslip, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Foxglove, Goldenrod, Iris, Lilac, Magnolia, Oats, Pea,      Peach, Plum, Raspberry, Rose, Sugar Cane, Thyme, Vanilla, Violet, Willow

Mars
         Allspice, Basil, Briony, Broom, Carrot, Chili Pepper, Dragon’s Blood, Ginger, Holly, Hops, Onion, Pennyroyal, Pine, Reed, Thistle, Woodruff
Jupiter
        Anise, Bodhi, Chestnut, Clove, Honeysuckle, Maple, Meadowsweet, Nutmeg, Sage, Witch Grass

Saturn
          Amaranth, Beech, Belladonna, Cypress, Elm, Hellebore, Ivy, Lady’s Slipper, Mimosa, Pansy, Patchouly, Tamarisk, Yew
Enhanced by Zemanta

Feminine Herbs

Feminine Herbs

Aloe, Apple, Apricot, banana, Barley, Beech, Belladonna, Birch, Blackberry, Cherry, Coltsfoot, Comfrey, Cypress, Daffodil, Daisy, Elder, Elm,  Eucalyptus, Foxglove, Gardenia, Goldenrod, Grape, Heather, Hellebore, Honesty, Iris, Irish Moss, Ivy, Jasmine, Lady’s Mantle, Lemon, Lilac, Lily, Lucky  Hand, Magnolia, Mugwort, Myrrh, Myrtle, Oats, Orchid, Pansy, Peach, Plum, Raspberry, Rose, Rye, Sagebrush, Sandalwood, Strawberry, Tansy, Thyme, Tulip,  Vanilla, Violet, Wheat, Willow, Yarrow, Yew  
Enhanced by Zemanta

The Baneful Herb, Foxglove

Foxglove

Many of the common names of this plant pertain to its toxic nature (Witches’ glove, Dead Man’s Bells, Bloody Fingers). Foxglove belongs to the Figwort family (Scrophulariaceae) and the whole plant is toxic. It contains various cardiac glycosides. Foxglove also went by the names Goblin’s Gloves (in Wales), Throttle-wort, Thimble Flower, Finger Flower, Ireland it was also known as Fairy Cap, Lunsmore, and the Great Herb. Foxglove was also considered dear to faeries. If a plant was harmed, the faeries would bring retribution

The Baneful Herbs

The Baneful Herbs

Belladonna = Also known as deadly nightshade, Belladonna is a source of the poisonous drug atropine. In minute quantities, atropine, in the form of a sulfate, is used to dilate the pupils of the eye, to relieve pain, to diminish secretions, and to relieve spasms. In greater quantities, it was used to kill. Belladonna was believed to have been used in flying potions.

Cinquefoil = In folklore, cinquefoil was used in flying potions. Found in many old recipes & Grimores.

Deadly Nightshade = Deadly nightshade was ingested by those who wished to foresee the future.

Foxglove = Many of the common names of this plant pertain to its toxic nature (Witches’ glove, Dead Man’s Bells, Bloody Fingers). Foxglove belongs to the Figwort family (Scrophulariaceae) and the whole plant is toxic. It contains various cardiac glycosides. Foxglove also went by the names Goblin’s Gloves (in Wales), Throttle-wort, Thimble Flower, Finger Flower, Ireland it was also known as Fairy Cap, Lunsmore, and the Great Herb. Foxglove was also considered dear to faeries. If a plant was harmed, the faeries would bring retribution.

Hemlock= Hemlock is an extremely poisonous cousin of parsley. The juice from hemlock’s tiny white flowers was believed to be used to make men impotent. “The plant was an ingredient in many Witches’ Ointments…. According to German folk tradition, the hemlock was home to a toad, which lived beneath it and sucked up its poisons.

Hemp = Hemp was used in many old spells and Incense. I do not consider this plant poisonous, and believe it is quite a magical plant when the female flowers are smoked. Mother earth gave us this plant for a reason. Not to mention what we could do with the fibers and just about every other part of this plant. We could feed and cloth the world.(end rant).

Mandrake = Another plant with a narcotic effect, mandrake or the mandragore (Mandragora officinarum L.) was thought to be a potentially lethal herb to harvest from the earth. For this reason, great caution was used in gathering these magical roots. Many people believed that the mandrake shrieked when harvested and that anyone hearing the piercing cry would die. The root of the mandrake resembles a phallus or a human torso, and for this reason was believed to have occult powers. In some areas of Europe, possession of the root was punishable by death. The crushed root was purported to have caused hallucinations followed by a death-like trance and sleep. The root was also said to have caused insanity and was believed to have been used in flying potions Mandrake root makes a powerful addition to any “Binding spell” and works as a great “Witches” protector.