Till tomorrow, my sweets….

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Gemstone of the Day for September 25th is Flint

Gemstone of the Day

  Flint


(Color: Dark brown to black siliceous nodules, usually found in chalk)

Hardness: 7                        
Specific Gravity: 2.65                           
Chemistry: SiO2 silicon oxide                          
Class: Silicates                                
Crystallography: none                                        
Cleavage: None                                  
Fracture: Conchoidal                
Streak: colorless or greenish                              
Luster: Waxy, dull

Healing: Useful when severing emotional ties. Used in the treatment of kidney stones, skin lesions, lung disorders and indigestion.

Workings: Flint is also known as Elf Shot, Thunderstone and Faery Shot. It is used to keep faeries away. Flint is also used as a protection amulet. Its energy is projective. It is ruled by the planet Mars and its element is Fire. Use in protection and healing spells. Astrological sign is Scorpio. Vibrates to the number 7.

Chakra Applications: Use in connection with the Third Eye Chakra, especially during thought transfers.

Foot Notes: Flint is a granular cryptocrystalline variety of quartz, typically dark in color. It is a form of silica more opaque than chalcedony  Flint is found in many localities throughout the world. Flint and chert nodules occur typically in limestone and chalk.

 
Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

Herb of the Day for September 25th is Cardamom

Herb of the Day

Cardamom


  (Elettaria cardamomum)


Medicinal Uses: Used as a digestive aid, eases gluten intolerance (celiac disease). Sprinkle powder on cereal. Used for indigestion, nausea, complaints of the lung and bedwetting.

Magickal uses: Cardamom is a feminine herb ruled by the planet Venus. Its associated element is Water. And it is used in love spells. For love bake them into an apple pie, add to sachets and incenses.

Properties: anti-diarrhea, anti-spasmodic, antiseptic, antimicrobial, aphrodisiac, astringent, diuretic, settles digestive, helps with flatulence, stimulate saliva, tonic

Growth: Cardamom, popularly, known as Queen of Spices is native to the evergreen rainy forests of Western Ghats in South India. Cardamom is a herbaceous perennial having underground rhizomes. The aerial pseudostem is made of leaf sheaths. Inflorescence is a long panicle with racemes clusters arising from the underground stem, but comes up above the soil. Flowers are bisexual, fragrant, fruit is a trilocular capsule. Flower initiation takes place in March-April and from initiation to full bloom, it takes nearly 30 days and from bloom to maturity, it takes about 5 to 6 months.

Antacid:   Here is a delicious recipe to combat heartburn, cramps and other irritations due to acidity: toast and butter a slice of raisin bread; sprinkle with 1 tsp. ground cardamom chew very thoroughly before swallowing.

Aperitif:  Make an infusion by infusing the following for 10 minutes in 2 cups  of boiling water:

1 tsp. basil                                                                                                                                                                        
the seeds from one cardamom pod                                                                                                                                 
1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon                                                                                                                                                
1/2 tsp. brown sugar
drink one small liqueur glassful two hours before the meal
Source:
Author: Crick

Deity of the Day for September 25th is Hera, Queen of the Gods in Greek Mythology

Deity of the Day

Hera

Queen of the Gods in Greek Mythology


Definition:

In Greek mythology, the beautiful goddess Hera was queen of the Greek gods and the wife of Zeus, the king. Hera was goddess of marriage and childbirth. Since Hera’s husband was Zeus, king not only of gods, but of philanderers, Hera spent a lot of time in Greek mythology angry with Zeus. So Hera is described as jealous and quarrelsome.

Hera’s Jealousy

Among the more famous victims of Hera’s jealousy is Hercules (aka “Heracles,” whose name means the glory of Hera).

Hera persecuted the famous hero from before the time he could walk for the simple reason that Zeus was his father, but another woman — Alcmene — was his mother. Despite the fact that Hera was not Hercules’ mother, and despite her hostile actions — such as sending snakes to kill him when he was a newborn baby, she served as his nurse when he was an infant.

Hera persecuted many of the other women Zeus seduced, in one way or another.

“The anger of Hera, who murmured terrible against all child-bearing women that bare children to Zeus….”

Theoi Hera: Callimachus, Hymn 4 to Delos 51 ff (trans. Mair)

“Leto had relations with Zeus, for which she was hounded by Hera all over the earth.”
Theoi Hera: Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 1. 21 (trans. Aldrich)

 

Hera’s Children

Hera is usually counted single parent mother of Hephaestus and the normal biological mother of Hebe and Ares. Their father is usually said to be her husband, Zeus, although Clark [“Who Was the Wife of Zeus?” by Arthur Bernard Clark; The Classical Review, (1906), pp.

365-378] explains the identities and births of Hebe, Ares, and Eiletheiya, goddess of childbirth, and sometimes named child of the divine couple, otherwise.

Clark argues that the king and queen of the gods had no children together.

Hebe may have been fathered by a lettuce. The association between Hebe and Zeus may have been sexual rather than familial.

Ares might have been conceived via a special flower from the fields of Olenus. Zeus’ free admission of his paternity of Ares, Clark hints, may be only to avoid the scandal of being a cuckold.

On her own, Hera gave birth to Hephaestus.

 

Parents of Hera

Like brother Zeus, Hera’s parents were Cronos and Rhea, who were Titans.
Roman Hera

In Roman mythology, the goddess Hera is known as Juno.

 

Fast Facts About Hera

Name: Greek – Hera; Roman – Juno

Family

Parents: Cronus and Rhea

Foster Parents: Oceanus and Thetys, among others

Siblings: Hestia, Demeter, Poseidon, Hades, and Zeus

Mates: Zeus

Children: Ares, Hephaestus, Eileithyia, Hebe

Role of Hestia

For Humans: Hera was goddess of marriage. In later myth, Hera is treated as the queen of heaven, the female counterpart of Zeus
For Gods: Queen

Canonical Olympian? Yes. Hera is one of the canonical Olympians.

 

 

Source:

Author: N.S. Gill

N.S. Gill’s Ancient/Classical History Glossary

Article located on About.com

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Pluto’s Snakeskin Terrain

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2015 September 25

 Pluto’s Snakeskin Terrain
Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins Univ./APL, Southwest Research Institute

 

Explanation: A mountainous region informally known as Tartarus Dorsa sprawls some 530 kilometers (330 miles) across this Plutonian landscape. Recently downloaded from New Horizons, it combines blue, red, and infrared image data in an extended color view captured near the spacecraft’s close approach to Pluto on July 14. Shadows near the terminator, the line between Pluto’s dim day and night, emphasize a rough, scaly texture. The stunning image resolves details on the distant world about 1.3 kilometers (0.8 miles) across. Refering to a part of Hades in ancient Greek mythology, Tartarus Dorsa borders Tombaugh Regio to the east.

The Moon In The News: NASA Sheds Light On Supermoon Eclipse

NASA Scientist Sheds Light on Rare Sept. 27 Supermoon Eclipse

Coming soon for the first time in more than 30 years: you’ll be able to witness a supermoon in combination with a lunar eclipse.

Late on Sept. 27, 2015, in the U.S. and much of the world, a total lunar eclipse will mask the moon’s larger-than-life face for more than an hour.

But what is this behemoth of the night sky? Not a bird, not a plane, it’s a supermoon! Although this incarnation of the moon comes around only once every year, it’s not as mysterious as you might think.

“Because the orbit of the moon is not a perfect circle, the moon is sometimes closer to the Earth than at other times during its orbit,” said Noah Petro, deputy project scientist for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. “When the moon is farthest away it’s known as apogee, and when it’s closest it’s known as perigee. On Sept. 27, we’re going to have a perigee full moon—the closest full moon of the year.”

At perigee, the moon is about 31,000 miles closer to Earth than at apogee. That distance equates to more than once around the circumference of Earth. Its looming proximity makes the moon appear 14 percent larger and 30 percent brighter in the sky than an apogee full moon, which sparked the term “supermoon.”

“There’s no physical difference in the moon,” Petro said. “It just appears slightly bigger in the sky. It’s not dramatic, but it does look larger.”

A lunar eclipse typically puts on an even greater show. For more than an hour, Earth’s shadow swallows up the moon as the planet comes between the sun and the moon. Lunar eclipses typically occur at least twice a year, and 228 will occur in the 21st century alone. While people such as the Incans and Mesopotamians historically viewed lunar eclipses as random and frightening occurrences, they’re actually quite predictable.

Scientists at Goddard have predicted eclipses a thousand years into the future. Petro said it’s just a matter of knowing where Earth, the sun and the moon are at a given point in time.

As for the supermoon and a lunar eclipse occurring simultaneously, Petro said, “It’s just planetary dynamics. The orbit of the moon around Earth is inclined to the axis of Earth and the orbital plane of all these things just falls into place every once in a while. When the rhythms line up, you might get three to four eclipses in a row or a supermoon and an eclipse happening.”

But the proverbial stars only align for this event once every few decades, making this phenomenon much rarer than a supermoon or a lunar eclipse separately. The last supermoon/lunar eclipse combination occurred in 1982 and the next won’t happen until 2033. “That’s rare because it’s something an entire generation may not have seen,” said Petro.

Despite its rarity, Petro said the event is not cause for concern. “The only thing that will happen on Earth during an eclipse is that people will wake up the next morning with neck pain because they spent the night looking up,” he said.

The total eclipse will last one hour and 12 minutes, and will be visible to North and South America, Europe, Africa, and parts of West Asia and the eastern Pacific. Viewers can see the supermoon unmasked after nightfall. Earth’s shadow will begin to dim the supermoon slightly beginning at 8:11 p.m. EDT. A noticeable shadow will begin to fall on the moon at 9:07 p.m., and the total eclipse will start at 10:11 p.m.

Tune in on Sept. 27 for this rare event, taking place right in Earth’s neighborhood.
Sources:
Ashley Morrow
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.
NASA