Till tomorrow, my sweets……

Goddess Bless PicturesWe leave you with one of our favorites and I know some of yours, Amazing Grace by Verna Knapp. Let the words burn through your heart and mind, because sometimes we forget what a very fortunate people we are!

Amazing grace, how sweet the Earth
that bore a witch like me!
I once was burned, now I survive,
was hung and now I sing.

T’was grace that drew down the moon
and grace that raised the seas.
The magic in the people’s will
will set our Mother free.

We face the East and breathe the winds
that move across this earth.
From gentle breeze to hurricane
our breath will bring forth the change.

Turn towards the South and feel the fire
that burns in you and me.
The spirit’s flame will rise again
and burn eternally.

We greet the West, our souls awash
in tides of primal birth.
Our tears and blood, our pain and love
will cleanse and heal the earth.

Reach into the North and know your roots
down deep ancestral caves.
We find the wisdom of the Crone,
Of circles we are made.

Amazing earth, enduring life,
from death into rebirth.
T’is earth I am and earth I love
and earth I’ll always be.

Amazing grace, how sweet the Earth
that bore witches like we.
We once were burned, now we survive,
were hung and now we sing.

Goddess bless, so mote it be,
Our magic spirals on.
Merry meet and merry part
and merry meet again.

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Magickal Goody of the Day for September 14th – Magic Stress Eraser Mist

Magickal Goody of the Day

witch potion 001

Magic Stress Eraser Mist

 

Simple. It erases stress magickally. If stress is a challenge for you, it might be a good idea to keep a travel mister of this in your purse or at your desk.

You will need:

Bach Rescue Remedy

Essential oil of lavender

Essential oil of peppermint

Rose water in a mister

Put 4 drops of Rescue Remedy, 6 drops of lavender, and 4 drops of peppermint in the mister. Shake. Hold the bottle in both hands, and empower it with your intention to erase stress and create a peaceful, uplifting, and serene atmosphere. Visualize very bright white light filling the bottle.

Now you have the perfect way to ease all your stress away! Enjoy!

 

Magical Housekeeping

Tess Whitehurst

Crystal of the Day for September 14th is Malachite

Crystal of the Day

Malachite


Named for the Greek word for “mallow”, a green herb.

(Color: banded light and dark green or (if crystalline), just dark green)

Hardness: 3.5-4                
Specific Gravity: 3.9+                
Chemistry: Cu2(CO3)(OH)2, Copper Carbonate Hydroxide.        
Class: Carbonates              
Crystallography: monoclinic; 2/m                    
Cleavage: good in one direction                   
Fracture: conchoidal to splintery              
Streak: green                                
Luster: dull to silky

Healing: Malachite is known as a powerful healing stone. Use it to relieve stress and depression. It is also used in cases of rheumatism, asthma, Parkinson’s, MS, cholera, as well as some heart problems. Malachite is used for deep emotional healing. Malachite is useful for treating cramps such as menstrual cramps and is used to faciliate child birth. It is also used to lower ones blood pressure.

Workings: Malachite is used for money and love spells. Also for grounding and centering. Use it to absorb negative energies. Use malachite to enhance ones psychic abilities. It is used in protective magic (especially concerning children) and guards against negative influences and physical dangers. Ancient cultures believed that by drinking from malachite vessels we would be able to learn to communicate with the animal kingdom. Malachite is sometimes used for scrying purposes. It is often used for deep introspection. Its astrological signs are Capricorn and Scorpio. It vibrates to the number 9. Its energy is receptive, its planet is Venus and its associated Element is Earth.

Chakra Applications: Malachite is used to clear and activate all of the Chakras. Use it to stimulate the Throat and Heart chakras.

Foot Notes: Malachite was used as an eye paint in the Badarian age, circa 4000 BCE. Malachite dust is toxic, avoid breathing this dust.

Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

Herb of the Day for September 14th is Thyme

Herb of the Day

Thyme

(Thymus vulgaris)

Around 3000 BCE the Sumerians were using it as a medicinal ingredient, and the Egyptians included it among the herbs and spices used in mummification.

Medicinal Uses: Thyme is a powerful antiseptic. It is used in cases of anemia, bronchial ailments, and intestinal disturbances. It is used as an antiseptic against tooth decay, and destroys fungal infections as in athlete’s foot and skin parasites such as crabs and lice. It is good for colic, flatulence, and colds.It is used for sinusitis and asthma. Eliminates gas and reduces fever, mucus, and headaches. Good for chronic respiratory problems, colds, flu, bronchitis, whooping cough, and sore throat. Lowers cholesterol levels. Good to relieve coughs, and whooping cough. Externally, helps sprains and strains.

A poultice can be made from the leaves of thyme that will combat all forms of inflammation and infection. Effective against hookworms. Rub the extract between the toes daily for athlete’s foot. Used externally, the extract can be used daily for crabs, lice, and scabies.

Taken internally by standard infusion, thyme is a first-rate digestive, febrifuge and liver tonic. Anti-spasmodic and nervine, it is held to cure a wide range of psychological disorders, even insanity. Hysteria, halitosis and assorted female ailments, especially mastitis, loss of appetite. Thyme baths are said to be helpful for neurastenia, rheumatic problems,, paralysis, bruises, swellings, and sprains. The salve made from thyme can be used for shingles.

Thyme is an excellent lung cleanser. Use it to dry up and clear out moist phlegm and to treat whooping cough. It makes a good tea for the mother after childbirth, as it helps expel the placenta. Steep one-half teaspoon fresh herb or one teaspoon dried herb in one-half cup of hot water for five minutes. Take up to one and a half cups a day in quarter-cup doses. A natural antiseptic, thyme is often used in salves for wounds, swellings, sciatica, and failing eyes. The tea relives gas and colic (as does the oil, taken in one- to five-drop doses). The tincture can be used in ten- to twenty-drop doses, taken three times a day. Use thyme for headaches and hangovers.

Thyme oil should be reserved for topical use, as internally it may lead to dizziness, vomiting, and breathing difficulties

Magickal uses: The Greeks burned thyme in their temples to purify them as we do today to purify an area. Add it to the magickal, cleansing bath of springtime, along with marjoram, to remove all sorrows and ills of winter. It is worn or added to the ritual cup to aid in communicating with the deceased. (It also helps one see Otherworldly entities.) To ensure a restful night’s sleep free from nightmares, sleep with it beneath your pillow. When worn it will help psychic powers develop, and if worn be a woman in her hair, it will make her irresistible. The aroma will revitalize your strength and courage. A place where wild thyme grows will be a particularly powerful energy center on the Earth.

Properties: Anthelmitic, antispasmodic, carminative, diaphoretic, expectorant, sedative. Contains borneol, cavacrol, fluorine, gum, trace minerals, bitter principle, saponins, flavonoids, essential oils, tannins, triterpenic acids, and vitamins B-complex, C, and D.

Growth: Thyme is a perennial that loves warm, sunny fields, and is found throughout North America. Thyme has numerous woody stems 6-10 inches high, covered in fine hair, and flattish round leaves, growing in pairs. The flowers, small bluish-purple, two-lipped, are borne in whorled in dense, head-like clusters, blooming fro May to September, like the rest of the plant, are heavily scented. Thyme requires full sun and fairly dry, light, well-drained soil. Trim it back after flowering to prevent it from becoming woody.

Infusion: steep 1/2 tsp. fresh herb or 1 tsp. dried herb in 1/2 cup water for 3 to 5 minutes. Take 1 to 1 1/2 cups per day, a mouthful at a time.

Oil: take 10-20 drops, 3 times per day.

Bath additive: make a strong decoction and add to the bath water.

 

 

Source:
Author: Crick
Website: The Whispering Woods

Deity of the Day for September 14th – Njord, Norse God of the Sea

Deity of the Day

Njord

Norse God of the Sea

 

In Norse Paganism, Njörðr is a god among the Vanir. Njörðr, father of the deities Freyr and Freyja by his unnamed Vanir sister, was in an ill-fated marriage with the goddess Skaði, lives in Nóatún and is associated with sea, seafaring, wind, fishing, wealth, and crop fertility.

Njörðr is attested in the Poetic Edda, compiled in the 13th century from earlier traditional sources, the Prose Edda, written in the 13th century by Snorri Sturluson, in euhemerized form as a beloved mythological early king of Sweden in Heimskringla, also written by Snorri Sturluson in the 13th century, as one of three gods invoked in the 14th century Hauksbók ring oath, and in numerous Scandinavian place names. Veneration of Njörðr survived into 18th or 19th century Norwegian folk practice, where the god is recorded as Njor and thanked for a bountiful catch of fish.

Njörðr has been the subject of an amount of scholarly discourse and theory, often connecting him with the figure of the much earlier attested Germanic goddess Nerthus, the hero Hadingus, and theorizing on his formerly more prominent place in Norse paganism due to the appearance of his name in numerous place names. Njörðr is sometimes modernly anglicized as Njord, Njoerd, or Njorth.

The name Njörðr corresponds to that of the older Germanic fertility goddess Nerthus, and both derive from the Proto-Germanic *Nerþuz. The original meaning of the name is contested, but it may be related to the Irish word nert which means “force” and “power”. It has been suggested that the change of sex from the female Nerthus to the male Njörðr is due to the fact that feminine nouns with u-stems disappeared early in Germanic language while the masculine nouns with u-stems prevailed. However, other scholars hold the change to be based not on grammatical gender but on the evolution of religious beliefs; that *Nerþuz and Njörðr appear as different genders because they are to be considered separate beings. The name Njörðr may be related to the name of the Norse goddess Njörun.

Njörðr’s name appears in various place names in Scandinavia, such as Nærdhæwi (now Nalavi), Njærdhavi (now Mjärdevi), Nærdhælunda (now Närlunda), Nierdhatunum (now Närtuna) in Sweden, Njarðvík in southwest Iceland, Njarðarlög and Njarðey (now Nærøy) in Norway. Njörðr’s name appears in a word for sponge; Njarðarvöttr (Old Norse “Njörðr’s glove”). Additionally, in Old Icelandic translations of Classical mythology the Roman god Saturn’s name is glossed as “Njörðr.

 

Theories about Njord

Nerthus

Njörðr is often identified with the goddess Nerthus, whose reverence by various Germanic tribes is described by Roman historian Tacitus in his 1st CE century work Germania. The connection between the two is due to the linguistic relationship between Njörðr and the reconstructed *Nerþuz“Nerthus” being the feminine, Latinized form of what Njörðr would have looked like around 1 CE. This has led to theories about the relation of the two, including that Njörðr may have once been a hermaphroditic god or, generally considered more likely, that the name may indicate an otherwise unattested divine brother and sister pair such as Freyr and Freyja. Consequently, Nerthus has been identified with Njörðr’s unnamed sister with whom he had Freyja and Freyr, which is mentioned in Lokasenna.

Bieka-Galles

In Saami mythology, Bieka-Galles (or Biega-, Biegga-Galles, depending on dialect; “The Old Man of the Winds”) is a deity who rules over rain and wind, and is the subject of boat and wooden shovel (or, rather, oar) offerings. Due to similarities in between descriptions of Njörðr in Gylfaginning and descriptions of Bieka-Galles in 18th century missionary reports, Axel Olrik identified this deity as the result of influence from the seafaring North Germanic peoples on the landbound Saami.

Hadingus

Parallels have been pointed out between Njörðr and the figure of Hadingus, attested in book I of Saxo Grammaticus’ 13th century work Gesta Danorum. Some of these similarities include that, in parallel to Skaði and Njörðr in Skáldskaparmál, Hadingus is chosen by his wife Regnhild after selecting him from other men at a banquet by his lower legs, and, in parallel to Skaði and Njörðr in Gylfaginning, Hadingus complains in verse of his displeasure at his life away from the sea and how he is disturbed by the howls of wolves, while his wife Regnhild complains of life at the shore and states her annoyance at the screeching sea birds. Georges Dumézil theorized that in the tale Hadingus passes through all three functions of his trifunctional hypothesis, before ending as an Odinic hero, paralleling Njörðr’s passing from the Vanir to the Æsir in the Æsir-Vanir War.

Svafrþorinn

In stanza 8 of the poem Fjölsvinnsmál, Svafrþorinn is stated as the father of Menglöð by an unnamed mother, who the hero Svipdagr seeks. Menglöð has often been theorized as the goddess Freyja, and according to this theory, Svafrþorinn would therefore be Njörðr. The theory is complicated by the etymology of the name Svafrþorinn (þorinn meaning “brave” and svafr means “gossip”) (or possibly connects to sofa “sleep”), which Rudolf Simek says makes little sense when attempting to connect it to Njörðr.

 

Source:
Wikipedia

Astronomy Picture of the Day – Pluto from above Cthulhu Regio

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2015 September 14

Pluto from above Cthulhu Regio
Image Credit: NASA, Johns Hopkins Univ./APL, Southwest Research Inst.

 

Explanation: New high resolution images of Pluto are starting to arrive from the outer Solar System. The robotic New Horizons spacecraft, which zoomed by Pluto in July, has finished sending back some needed engineering data and is now transmitting selections from its tremendous storehouse of images of Pluto and its moons. The featured image, a digital composite, details a surprising terrain filled with craters, plains, landscape of unknown character, and landforms that resemble something on Earth but are quite unexpected on Pluto. The light area sprawling across the upper right has been dubbed Sputnik Planum and is being studied for its unusual smoothness, while the dark cratered area just under the spacecraft is known as Cthulhu Regio. So far, New Horizons has only shared a few percent of the images and data it took during its Pluto flyby, but will continue to send back new views of the dwarf planet even as it glides outward toward even more distant explorations.

Daily Planet Tracker: Saturn in Scorpio, Now Until Sep 17, 2015

Planet Tracker

Saturn in Scorpio

Now Until Sep 17, 2015

Saturn is the last planet visible to the naked eye. For millennia, it represented the limits of the solar system and came to symbolize time, structure and order. Saturn takes about 29 years to orbit the Sun, spending about two and a half years in each sign of the zodiac.

Saturn is the planet that says “no” but means “yes.” The no comes from Saturn showing us what isn’t working, sometimes in the form of frustrating blockages or delays. But these help us see where we need to put in effort to make concrete changes. Saturn says “yes” as the planet of crystallization that brings energy into matter. Saturn’s presence in a sign of the zodiac shows us where we are likely to meet limits and how to construct something useful.

Serious Saturn in survivalist Scorpio forces us to face the bottom line. Life and death, sex, power and our economic well being can be pushed to the limits during this two-year transit. Concentrating our efforts where they are most needed may require eliminating ideas, activities, objects or individuals that distract us from these essential tasks.

Take account of your desires, even the inappropriate ones. Knowing what you want helps you become a better negotiator in relationships. Being nice is, well, nice but doesn’t touch the depth of emotion associated with Scorpio. Partnerships grow when they are rooted in honesty, especially with ourselves. We can compromise in pursuit of our desires but if we don’t even know what they are, all we’re left with are manipulation and chance.

Getting the most out of our resources is another expression of Saturn in Scorpio. Scarcity could be a collective problem but, ideally, will lead to more efficient systems of production and distribution. Cleaning up toxins in the environment and within our bodies and minds are other healthy expressions of this transit.

How money is handled, especially involving insurance and debt, grows in importance with Saturn in Scorpio. There may be even more abuses in the financial world but that could be what it takes to make some significant reforms. Borrowing for well-defined purposes and with a realistic repayment schedule is an appropriate way to use this cycle.

Sexual repression is a dark side of Saturn in Scorpio. The AIDS epidemic was at a very high level in the early 80s, the last time this transit occurred. Responsiblity for erotic inclinations doesn’t mean that they should be suppressed but rather that we deepen our understanding of them. Tantra, a form of sacred sexuality, teaches us about intimacy that is not possible when we deny this essential part of ourselves.

 

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