Leap Day Customs & Traditions

Black cats:-)
Leap Day Customs & Traditions

Leap Day, on February 29, has been a day of traditions, folklore and superstitions ever since Leap Years were first introduced by Julius Caesar over 2000 years ago.

Women Propose to Their Men
According to an old Irish legend, or possibly history, St Brigid struck a deal with St Patrick to allow women to propose to men – and not just the other way around – every four years.
This is believed to have been introduced to balance the traditional roles of men and women in a similar way to how leap day balances the calendar.

In some places, leap day has been known as “Bachelors’ Day” for the same reason. A man was expected to pay a penalty, such as a gown or money, if he refused a marriage proposal from a woman on Leap Day.

In many European countries, especially in the upper classes of society, tradition dictates that any man who refuses a woman’s proposal on February 29 has to buy her 12 pairs of gloves. The intention is that the woman can wear the gloves to hide the embarrassment of not having an engagement ring. During the middle ages there were laws governing this tradition.

Leap Day Babies World Record
People born on February 29 are all invited to join The Honor society of Leap Year Day Babies.

When do Leap Day Babies Celebrate Their Birthdays?
According to the Guinness Book of Records, there are Leap Day World Record Holders both of a family producing three consecutive generations born on February 29 and of the number of children born on February 29 in the same family.

Unlucky in Love
In Scotland, it used to be considered unlucky for someone to be born on leap day, just as Friday 13th is considered an unlucky day by many. Greeks consider it unlucky for couples to marry during a leap year, and especially on Leap Day.

St Oswald’s Day
Leap day is also St Oswald’s Day, named after the archbishop of York who died on February 29, 992. His memorial is celebrated on February 29 during leap years and on February 28 during common years.

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Celebrating Legends, Folklore & Other Spirituality 365 Days a Year for Feb. 16 – Celebration of Victoria

Wicca

February 16

Celebration of Victoria

Victory, called Victoria by the Romans and Nice (Nike) by the Greeks, was a Goddess who was the personification of success or victory. According to her legend she was the daughter of Pallas and Styx and became the patroness of heroes, guiding them to greatness. Revered by the Roman people, she was given an altar in the Senate. This sacred monument became one of the most important symbols of organized Paganism in the Roman Empire and a point of bitter confrontation between the pagans and the Christians in the fourth century A.D. when it was ordered destroyed. The altar was finally abolished

Let’s Talk Witch – Pantheon Pathways

witchcraft

Pantheon Pathways

 

As Witches, we often draw upon the mythology of many different lands to find the god and goddess figures that we identify with most strongly. And while this can vary greatly from Witch to Witch (like everything else we do-hey, at least we are not a bunch of boring conformists), many of us are drawn to the pantheons (from the Greek “temple of the gods,” meaning the officially recognized gods of a particular people) of the Greek, Roman, Egyptian, and Celtic cultures, with a few Norse and Hindu gods thrown in for good measure.

It is interesting to see how much the gods from one culture resemble the gods in another. It makes sense, I suppose, when you consider that most Pagan peoples had the same interests as we do today: love, protection, prosperity, the moon, growing things, etc.

In addition, it is historically possible in many cases to follow the path that a god took from one culture to another. For instance, many of the Roman gods and goddesses were taken more or less directly from the Greeks who preceded them.

It is fine to focus on one pantheon or culture, but it is also okay to mix and match. The gods that want you will find you, that much is for sure.

 

 

Everyday Witch A to Z: An Amusing, Inspiring & Informative Guide to the Wonderful World of Witchcraft

Deborah Blake

 

Daily Feng Shui New for Nov. 6th – ‘Birthstone Of November’

The birthstone of November is the mystical, magical topaz. The ancient Greeks believed that this gemstone had the power to give strength, improve eyesight and make its wearer invisible in times of emergency. Ages-old traditions also say that topaz is a symbol of friendship, love, fidelity and purity. I suppose that getting all of those gifts from this one stone would make anyone celebrating one have a very happy birthday this month!

By Ellen Whitehurst for Astrology.com

Let’s Talk Witch – To Cast or Not To Cast

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Let’s Talk Witch – To Cast or Not To Cast

That Is The Question

The first essential element of spellcasting is deciding whether or not to use a spell at all. After all, you don’t always need a power tool; some jobs are just as easily done with a simple screwdriver. So before you get started, you need to decide if a spell is really the right tool to deal with the problem at hand. Take a long, honest look at the situation, and see which one of these categories fits you best and the task at hand:

When to cast a spell:

When you have exhausted all the mundane options but still need to achieve a goal (the spell not only puts your intentions out into the universe but is also a way of asking for help).

When the spell will affect only you (such as casting a spell to open yourself to love).

When do you know what you want and are willing to do the work required to get it (like putting in applications at appropriate places after asking for the perfect job).

When only good can come from the spell.

When not to cast:

When there is a simple solution that doesn’t require magick (you need to lose five pounds, haven’t tried a diet yet, and have plenty of time).

When casting a spell would interfere with free will (casting a love spell to get a particular person, for instance).

When you aren’t sure what you really want to achieve (if you are uncertain of the end results you want, it is hard to truly focus enough will to make a spell work).

When there is the possibility of causing harm to yourself or to others (remember, harm none).

If you are certain that the best solution for the situation is casting a spell, then it is time to get down to work and craft yourself the perfect spell to get the job done.

Written Spells

Written Spells

by Skye Alexander

In earlier times, written spells were the province of a few wise men and women who were more literate than the majority of the populace. In many cultures, the written word was revered as a gift of the gods, especially among the Egyptians and Greeks. For this reason, written spells came to be considered more potent than verbal ones.

One of the oldest and best-known written spells is the word Abracadabra, customarily used to banish sickness. In ancient Chaldean texts, Abracadabra translates as “to perish like the word.” The letters in Abracadabra were written in the form of a descending triangle on parchment, which was then laid on the inflicted body part. Then the paper was removed and stuck in the cleft of a tree. As time and the elements destroyed the paper, the magick would begin to work. This whole process is an example of magickal symbolism, sympathy, and similars — the word disappears into nothingness; the paper disappears into nothingness; and, therefore, the disease or illness takes the hint and follows suit.

When you write with a pen or pencil, you activate the acupressure points in the thumb and fingertips. These points induce relaxation and strengthen the connection to the subconscious mind. Thus, writing contributes to the power of a spell because it helps to center your mind and engages your imagination.

Written words, affirmations, incantations, and sigils are often included in contemporary spells. A written intention might be slipped into a talisman or amulet. Spells are sometimes written on paper, then burned to release the intention into the universe. Witches might write a spell a set number of times — the number corresponds to the spell’s objective (e.g., six times for joint endeavors, eight times to attract financial security). The color of the ink, the shape of the paper, even the addition of aromatics to the ink or paper may contribute to the overall effect of the spell.

Why go through all this fuss? Because witches believe that the more dimensions magick has (with sensual dimensions being especially significant), the better the results will be.

"A Just Because Raffle" How's that grab ya'?

I decided what the heck. I like raffles, ya’ll like raffles. So let’s have one more than once in a blue moon. What do you say? I believe when you see the next beauty coming up for raffling you will say, “OH, HECK YES!” Take a gander…

Beautiful Hand carved Oak Wand

Held sacred by the Greeks, Norse, Druids, and the Native Americans, the oak  tree was generally believed to possess potent magic among a wide range  of cultures. In many cultures, the oak was very much associated with the sky and lighting, as it is frequently struck by lightning during  thunderstorms. For this reason, it was generally held as sacred to gods  of thunder or lightning, such as Zeus or Thor. It was also said to be  lucky, and to impart magical wisdom to those who embraced it or carved a piece of oak into a magical wand.

Within these traditions, each of these oak wands is a wonderful  addition to your spellcasting. Use it to channel energy and craft magic  when you are seeking inspiration, wisdom, or are otherwise seeking the  energized power associated with lightning and the sky. Each wand  measures approximately 15″ in length and has been only lightly finished  so as to leave the beautiful, original grain of the wood fully visible.  As each wand is a unique creation, please allow for slight variances in  size.

One More Thing Before We Move On….

Lucille Cali

You need to contact us in regards to which BOS you would like, sweetie.

Living Life As The Witch: Surviving Mercury’s Retrogrades

Surviving Mercury’s Retrogrades

The Roman god Mercury (Hermes to the Greeks) is the messenger of the gods—the link between spirit and matter, between soul and personality. Mercury symbolizes the power of communication, reasoning capacities and the ability to perceive relationships and gather facts. Mercury narrates, talks argues, debates, writes, analyzes, memorizes, studies travels, sells, reflects, and expresses itself through the hands as well as the tongue. Mercury is the magician and the trickster, two sides of the same coin, both inclined to be hard teachers. As a master of the hidden realms, Mercury confounds us with unexpected information and events and challenges our habitual perceptions. He also surprises us with unexpected gifts and new possibilities. If we like the surprises, we call it magick; if we don’t, we call it bad luck. Either way, the result is to jar us from the inertia of our routines and move us out of the mundane. So when the planet is retrograde, we can expect things “ruled” by Mercury to go haywire; it’s just another way Mercury is providing lessons.

Mercury retrograde periods are plagued by indecision, bad timing, delays, communication errors, and mechanical problems. Although many of us particularly notice computer problems during this time frame. Uranus is the planet that rules electronic devices, including computers. But since so much of our communication is conducted via computer, Mercury’s influence has expanded.

For many of us, knowing when Mercury goes retrograde can be a sanity saver. We can mark retrograde periods on our calendars so we won’t throw parties, write letters, buy electronics (or pets), sign contracts or take a new job. If nothing else, it’s a time to take extra care that what you say is understood as you meant it to be. For years, it was a time when I battened down the hatches and rode out the messed up energies.

No longer. Now I use the retrograde energies of Mercury in ways that the work like a kind of cosmic aikido move. Doing so has transformed nine weeks of my year into positive, productive times and my frustration level has decreased dramatically.

The key is to remember that Mercury retrograde is a time for “re” doing things. So it is a wonderful time for anything based on research, planning, examination of resources and completing projects. You don’t want to start anything new during Mercury retrograde, but if there is a project hanging out there that you haven’t gotten around to finishing, this is the perfect time to return to it.

Mercury retrograde is not my favorite time of the year, but I’m a lot less stressed about it now that I’ve learned some strategies for using the backward energy to my advantage.

Excerpt from:
Dancing with Mercury,
Backwards: Do More Than Just Survive Mercury
Retrograde
By Lisa McSherry
Llewellyn’s 2013 Magical Almanac for Every Day Living

Herb of the Day for April 14th – Parsley

Parsley

Petroselinum, the specific name of the Parsley, from which our English name is derived, is of classic origin, and is said to have been assigned to it by Dioscorides. The Ancients distinguished between two plants Selinon, one being the Celery (Apium graveolens) and called heleioselinon – i.e. ‘Marsh selinon,’ and the other – our parsley – Oreoselinon, ‘Mountain selinon’; or petroselinum, signifying ‘Rock selinon.’ This last name in the Middle Ages became corrupted into Petrocilium– this was anglicized into Petersylinge, Persele, Persely and finally Parsley.

There is an old superstition against transplanting parsley plants. The herb is said to have been dedicated to Persephone and to funeral rites by the Greeks. It was afterwards consecrated to St. Peter in his character of successor to Charon.

In the sixteenth century, Parsley was known as A. hortense, but herbalists retained the official name petroselinum. Linnaeus in 1764 named it A. petroselinum, but it is now assigned to the genus Carum.

The Greeks held Parsley in high esteem, crowning the victors with chaplets of Parsley at the Isthmian games, and making with it wreaths for adorning the tombs of their dead. The herb was never brought to table of old, being held sacred to oblivion and to the dead. It was reputed to have sprung from the blood of a Greek hero, Archemorus, the forerunner of death, and Homer relates that chariot horses were fed by warriors with the leaves. Greek gardens were often bordered with Parsley and Rue.

Several cultivated varieties exist, the principal being the common plain-leaved, the curled-leaved, the Hamburg or broadleaved and the celery-leaved. Of the variety crispum, or curled-leaved, there are no less than thirty-seven variations; the most valuable are those of a compact habit with close, perfectly curled leaves. The common sort bears close leaves, but is of a somewhat hardier nature than those of which the leaves are curled; the latter are, however, superior in every way. The variety crispumwas grown in very early days, being even mentioned by Pliny.

Turner says, ‘if parsley is thrown into fishponds it will heal the sick fishes therein.’

The Hamburg, or turnip-rooted Parsley, is grown only for the sake of its enlarged fleshy tap-root. No mention appears to have been made by the Ancients, or in the Middle Ages, of this variety, which Miller in his Gardeners’ Dictionary(1771) calls ‘the largerooted Parsley,’ and which under cultivation develops both a parsnip-like as well as a turnip-shaped form. Miller says:
‘This is now pretty commonly sold in the London markets, the roots being six times as large as the common Parsley. This sort was many years cultivated in Holland before the English gardeners could be prevailed upon to sow it. I brought the seeds of it from thence in 1727; but they refused to accept it, so that I cultivated it several years before it was known in the markets.’

At the present day, the ‘long white’ and the ’round sugar’ forms are sold by seedgrowers and are in esteem for flavouring soups, stews, etc., the long variety being also cooked and eaten like parsnips.

Neapolitan, or celery-leaved, parsley is grown for the use of its leafstalks, which are blanched and eaten like those of celery.

The plain-leaved parsley was the first known in this country, but it is not now much cultivated, the leaves being less attractive than those of the curled, of a less brilliant green, and coarser in flavour. It also has too close a resemblance to Fool’s Parsley (Anthriscus cynapium), a noxious weed of a poisonous nature infesting gardens and fields. The leaves of the latter, though similar, are, however, of a rather darker green and when bruised, emit an unpleasant odour, very different to that of Parsley. They are, also, more finely divided. When the two plants are in flower, they are easily distinguished, Anthriscus having three tiny, narrow, sharp-pointed leaflets hanging down under each little umbellule of the white umbel of flowers, whereas in the Garden Parsley there is usually only one leaflet under the main umbel, the leaflets or bracts at the base of the small umbellules only being short and as fine as hairs. Anthriscus leaves, also, are glossy beneath. Gerard called Anthriscus‘Dog’s Parsley,’ and says ‘the whole plant is of a naughty smell.’ It contains a peculiar alkaloid called Cynapium.

Stone Parsley (Sison), or Breakstone, is an allied plant, growing in chalky districts.

S. Amomum is a species well known in some parts of Britain, with cream-coloured flowers and aromatic seeds. The name is said to be derived from the Celtic sium(running stream), some of the species formerly included growing in moist localities.

Of our Garden Parsley (which he calls Parsele) Gerard says, ‘It is delightful to the taste and agreeable to the stomache,’ also ‘the roots or seeds boiled in ale and drank, cast foorth strong venome or poyson; but the seed is the strongest part of the herbe.’

Though the medicinal virtues of Parsley are still fully recognized, in former times it was considered a remedy for more disorders than it is now used for. Its imagined quality of destroying poison, to which Gerard refers, was probably attributed to the plant from its remarkable power of overcoming strong scents, even the odour of garlic being rendered almost imperceptible when mingled with that of Parsley.

The plant is said to be fatal to small birds and a deadly poison to parrots, also very injurious to fowls, but hares and rabbits will come from a great distance to seek for it, so that it is scarcely possible to preserve it in gardens to which they have access. Sheep are also fond of it, and it is said to be a sovereign remedy to preserve them from footrot, provided it be given them in sufficient quantities.

—Cultivation—Parsley requires an ordinary, good well-worked soil, but a moist one and a partially-shaded position is best. A little soot may be added to the soil.

The seed may be sown in drills, or broadcast, or, if only to be used for culinary purposes, as edging, or between dwarf or shortlived crops.

For a continuous supply, three sowings should be made: as early in February as the weather permits, in April or early in May, and in July and early August – the last being for the winter supply, in a sheltered position, with a southern exposure. Sow in February for the summer crop and for drying purposes. Seed sown then, however, takes several weeks to germinate, often as much as a full month. The principal sowing is generally done in April; it then germinates more quickly and provides useful material for cutting throughout the summer. A mid-August sowing will furnish good plants for placing in the cold frames for winter use.

An even broadcast sowing is preferable, if the ground is in the condition to be trodden which appears to fix the seed in its place, and after raking leaves a firm even surface.

The seed should be but slightly covered, not more than 1/2 inch deep and thinly distributed; if in drills, these should be 1 foot apart.

It is not necessary, however (though usual), to sow the seed where the plants are to be grown, as when large enough, the seedlings can be pricked out into rows.

When the seedlings are well out of the ground – about an inch high – adequate thinning is imperative, as the plants dislike being cramped, and about 8 inches from plant to plant must be allowed: a well-grown plant will cover nearly a square foot of ground.

The rows should be liberally watered in dry weather; a sheltered position is preferred, as the plants are liable to become burnt up in very hot and dry summers. The rows should be kept clean of weeds, and frequent dressings may be applied with advantage.

If the growth becomes coarse in the summer, cut off all the leaves and water well. This will induce a new growth of fine leaves, and may always be done when the plants have grown to a good size, as it encourages a stocky growth.

Soon after the old or last year’s plants begin to grow again in the spring, they run to flower, but if the flower stems are promptly removed, and the plants top dressed and watered, they will remain productive for some time longer. Renew the beds every two years, as the plant dies down at the end of the second season.

When sowing Parsley to stand the winter, a plain-leaved variety will often be found superior to the curled or mossy sorts, which are, perhaps, handsomer, but the leaves retain both snow and rain, and when frost follows, the plants soon succumb. A plainleaved Parsley is far hardier, and will survive even a severe winter and is equally good for cooking, though not so attractive for garnishing. Double the trouble is experienced in obtaining a supply of Parsley during the winter, when only the curled-leaved varieties are given.

Where curled Parsley is desired and is difficult to obtain, because there is no sufliciently sheltered spot in the garden for it, it may often be saved by placing a frame-light over the bed during severe weather to protect the plants, or they may be placed altogether in cold frames. Care must be taken with all Parsley plants grown thus in frames, to pick off all decaying leaves directly noticed, and the soil should be stirred occasionally with a pointed stick between the plants, to prevent its becoming sour. Abundance of air should be given on all favourable occasions, removing the light altogether on fine days.

—Medicinal Action and Uses—The uses of Parsley are many and are by no means restricted to the culinary sphere. The most familiar employment of the leaves in their fresh state is, of course, finely-chopped, as a flavouring to sauces, soups, stuffings, rissoles, minces, etc., and also sprinkled over vegetables or salads. The leaves are extensively cultivated, not only for sending to market fresh, but also for the purpose of being dried and powdered as a culinary flavouring in winter, when only a limited supply of fresh Parsley is obtainable.

In addition to the leaves, the stemsare also dried and powdered, both as a culinary colouring and for dyeLg purposes. There is a market for the seeds to supply nurserymen, etc., and the roots of the turnip-rooted variety are used as a vegetable and flavouring.

Medicinally, the two-year-old roots are employed, also the leaves, dried, for making Parsley Tea, and the seeds, for the extraction of an oil called Apiol, which is of considerable curative value. The best kind of seed for medicinal purposes is that obtained from the Triple Moss curled variety. The wholesale drug trade generally obtains its seeds from farmers on the East coast, each sample being tested separately before purchases are made. It has been the practice to buy secondyear seeds which are practically useless for growing purposes: it would probably hardly pay farmers to grow for Apiol producing purposes only, as the demand is not sufficiently great.

—Constituents—Parsley Root is faintly aromatic and has a sweetish taste. It contains starch, mucilage, sugar, volatile oil and Apiin. The latter is white, inodorous, tasteless and soluble in boiling water.

Parsley fruit or ‘seeds’ contain the volatile oil in larger proportion than the root (2.6 per cent); it consists of terpenes and Apiol, to which the activity of the fruit is due. There are also present fixed oil, resin, Apiin, mucilage and ash. Apiol is an oily, nonnitrogenous allyl compound, insoluble in water, soluble in alcohol and crystallizable when pure into white needles. The British Pharmacopceia directs that Apiol be prepared by extracting the bruised fresh fruits with ether and distilling the solvent. The residue is the commercial liquid Apiol. It exercises all the virtues of the entire plant. Crystallized Apiol, or Parsley Camphor, is obtained by distilling the volatile oil to a low temperature. The value of the volatile oil depends on the amount of Apiol it contains. Oil obtained from German fruit contains this body in considerable quantity and becomes semi-solid at ordinary temperature, that from French fruit is much poorer in Apiol. In France, only the crystalline Apiol is official, but three different varieties, distinguished as green, yellow and white, are in use.

Apiol was first obtained in 1849 by Drs. Joret and Homolle, of Brittany, and proved an excellent remedy there for a prevailing ague. It is greatly used now in malarial disorders. The name Apiol has also been applied to an oleoresin prepared from the plant, which contains three closely-allied principles: apiol, apiolin and myristicin, the latter identical with the active principle of oil of Nutmeg. The term ‘liquid Apiol’ is frequently applied to the complete oleoresin. This occurs as a yellowish liquid with a characteristic odour and an acrid pungent taste. The physiological action of the oleoresin of Parsley has not been sufficiently investigated, it exercises a singular influence on the great nerve centres of the head and spine, and in large doses produces giddiness and deafness, fall of blood-pressure and some slowing of the pulse and paralysis. It is stated that the paralysis is followed by fatty degeneration of the liver and kidney, similar to that caused by myristicin.

Parsley has carminative, tonic and aperient action, but is chiefly used for its diuretic properties, a strong decoction of the root being of great service in gravel, stone, congestion of the kidneys, dropsy and jaundice. The dried leaves are also used for the same purpose. Parsley Tea proved useful in the trenches, where our men often got kidney complications, when suffering from dysentery.

A fluid extract is prepared from both root and seeds. The extract made from the root acts more readily on the kidneys than that from other parts of the herb. The oil extracted from the seeds, the Apiol, is considered a safe and efficient emmenagogue, the dose being 5 to 15 drops in capsules. A decoction of bruised Parsley seeds was at one time employed against plague and intermittent fever.

In France, a popular remedy for scrofulous swellings is green Parsley and snails, pounded in a mortar to an ointment, spread on linen and applied daily. The bruised leaves, applied externally, have been used in the same manner as Violet leaves (also Celandine, Clover and Comfrey), to dispel tumours suspected to be of a cancerous nature. A poultice of the leaves is said to be an efficacious remedy for the bites and stings of poisonous insects.

Culpepper tells us:
‘It is very comfortable to the stomach . . . good for wind and to remove obstructions both of the liver and spleen . . . Galen commendeth it for the falling sickness . . . the seed is effectual to break the stone and ease the pains and torments thereof…. The leaves of parsley laid to the eyes that are inflamed with heat or swollen, relieves them if it be used with bread or meat…. The juice dropped into the ears with a little wine easeth the pains.’

Formerly the distilled water of Parsley was often given to children troubled with wind, as Dill water still is.

—Preparations and Dosages—Fluid extract root, 1/2 to 1 drachm. Fluid extract seeds, 1/2 to 1 drachm. Apiol (oil), 5 to 15 drops in capsule.

—Preparation for Market—The roots are collected for medicinal purposes in the secondyear, in autumn or late summer, when the plant has flowered.

To dry Parsley towards the close of the summer for culinary use, it may be put into the oven on muslin trays, when cooking is finished, this being repeated several times till thoroughly dry and crisp, when the leaves should be rubbed in the hands or through a coarse wire sieve and the powder then stored in tins, so that neither air nor light can reach it, or the good colour will not be preserved. In the trade, there is a special method of drying which preserves the colour.

The oil is extracted from the ‘seeds’ or rather fruits, when fresh, in which condition they are supplied to manufacturing druggists.

Seasons Of The Witch – Ancient Holidays (and some not so ancient!)

Seasons Of The Witch – Ancient Holidays (and some not so ancient!)

 

Blessing of the Grapes – In Armenia, the blessing of the Grapes takes place on the Sunday closest to the Assumption (they coincide this year). No grapes are eaten until today when they are taken to church to be blessed, then distributed to the churchgoers when they leave. Women named Mary have parties in vineyards or their homes (because this is considered their name day — as in many cultures, the saint’s day associated with your name is celebrated like a birthday). Spicer, Dorothy Gladys, The Book of Festivals, The Women’s Press 1937

 

Hera Thelkinia – On the 20th day of the lunar month of Metageitnion, the Greeks celebrated this festival in honor of Hera as Thelkinia, which some translate as the Charmer and others as the Enchanter.

 

Cat Nights -Someone thought that cats deserved their own month-long holiday after the Dog Days and decided that this was the starting date for it. Makes sense to me.

 

Portunalia – An obscure Roman festival associated with the harbor god Portunus, whose symbol was the key. He may have been a god of gates, or the keys that secure grain storehouses. Until AD 17, this was also the dedication day of Janus’s temple. Considering the value of stored grain, which is both food in winter and seed for spring, it makes sense that blessing the keys or transporting the grain to the storehouse at harvest time would become a sacred ritual.

 

China: FEAST OF THE HUNGRY GHOSTS. Wide variety of offerings for those who died orphans, paupers or beggars & those who died far from home. Those lonesome & desolate souls may return to inhabit leaves & grasses, & spread plagues. If offerings are made, they may stay away.