Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 September 30

Equinox Sunrise Around the World

Collage Image Copyright: Luca Vanzella

Explanation: A planet-wide collaboration resulted in this remarkable array of sunrise photographs taken around the September 2022 equinox. The images were contributed by 24 photographers, one in each of 24 nautical time zones around the world. Unlike more complicated civil time zone boundaries, the 24 nautical time zones are simply 15 degree longitude bands corresponding to 1 hour steps that span the globe. Start at the upper right for the first to experience a sunrise in the nautical time zone corresponding to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) + 12 hours. In that time zone, the photographer was located in Christchurch, New Zealand. Travel to the west by looking down the column and then moving to the column toward the left for later sunrises as the time zone offset in hours from UTC decreases. Or, you can watch a video of September 2022 equinox sunrises around planet Earth.

Missing Birthday Horoscopes, Astronomy Picture of the Day and Emails

Well, I am finally back to posting. The regular posts for today will not be done because of catching up the birthday horoscopes and astronomy pictures. Sitting at my desk for 2 hours trying to get things done after not being at it for so long is making back start to hurt so I have to be more like the turtle than the hare with getting back into my routine of sitting at my desk for about 5 to 6 hours a day to bring you the things you enjoy reading. Tomorrow, I hope to be feeling up to posting for September 30th, October 1st. Which are the tomorrow posts for the Northern Hemisphere. Then Saturday I will be posting for October 2nd and 3rd which are the tomorrow posts for both hemispheres.

Thank you, Libra’s, for your patience in being able to read your birthday horoscopes. You can find your birthday horoscope by clicking on the date you want calendar on WOTC’s Homepage.

I am put up one post with the links to all the Astronomy Picture of the Day from September 13th to today instead of a post for each day.

I will be catching up on emails hopefully Saturday.

Thank you all for all the support, comments, and patience while I went through a heavy grieving period with major depression and anxiety problems. I will not say the depression and anxiety are back under my control, but I will say I am better than yesterday. But I know getting back into a regular routine is very important for my mental and emotional health so here I am. As you can tell I am coming ack kind of slowly.

Until we meet again dear sisters, brothers, and honored guests may your life be filled with all things positive! 

September 13 to September 29 Astronomy Picture of the Day

2022 September 29: DART Asteroid Impact from Space
2022 September 28: A Furious Sky over Mount Shasta
2022 September 27: DART: Impact on Asteroid Dimorphos
2022 September 26: All the Water on Planet Earth
2022 September 25: The Fairy of Eagle Nebula
2022 September 24: September Sunrise Shadows
2022 September 23: Ringed Ice Giant Neptune
2022 September 22: NGC 7331 Close Up
2022 September 21: The Horsehead Nebula in Infrared from Hubble
2022 September 20: Star Forming Region NGC 3582 without Stars
2022 September 19: Star Trails and Lightning over the Pyrenees
2022 September 18: Analemma over the Callanish Stones
2022 September 17: Perseverance in Jezero Crater s Delta
2022 September 16: The Tarantula Zone
2022 September 15: Harvest Moon over Sicily
2022 September 14: Waves of the Great Lacerta Nebula
2022 September 13: A Long Snaking Filament on the Sun

Astronomy Picture of the Day

Here is the list for the astronomy pictures of the day from September 1 to September 12, 2022. I will go back to posting them on their day starting tomorrow.

2022 September 12: Red Sprite Lightning over the Czech Republic
2022 September 11: Planets of the Solar System: Tilts and Spins
2022 September 10: Galaxy by the Lake
2022 September 09: Interstellar Voyager
2022 September 08: North America and the Pelican
2022 September 07: Tarantula Stars R136 from Webb
2022 September 06: An Iridescent Pileus Cloud over China
2022 September 05: Carina Cliffs from the Webb Space Telescope
2022 September 04: Sea and Sky Glows over the Oregon Coast
2022 September 03: Sun and Moon and ISS
2022 September 02: M51: The Whirlpool Galaxy
2022 September 01: The Tulip and Cygnus X-1

August 30, 2022 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 August 30

Jupiter from the Webb Space Telescope

Image Credit: NASAESACSAJupiter ERS TeamProcessing: Ricardo Hueso (UPV/EHU) & Judy Schmidt

Explanation: This new view of Jupiter is illuminating. High-resolution infrared images of Jupiter from the new James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) reveal, for example, previously unknown differences between high-floating bright clouds — including the Great Red Spot — and low-lying dark clouds. Also clearly visible in the featured Webb image are Jupiter’s dust ring, bright auroras at the poles, and Jupiter’s moons Amalthea and Adrastea. Large volcanic moon Io‘s magnetic funneling of charged particles onto Jupiter is also visible in the southern aurora. Some objects are so bright that light noticeably diffracts around Webb’s optics creating streaks. Webb, which orbits the Sun near the Earth, has a mirror over six meters across making it the largest astronomical telescope ever launched — with over six times more light-collecting area than Hubble.

August 29 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 August 29

The Horsehead Nebula Region without Stars

Image Credit & Copyright: George Chatzifrantzis

Explanation: The famous Horsehead Nebula in Orion is not alone. A deep exposure shows that the dark familiar shaped indentation, visible just right of center, is part of a vast complex of absorbing dust and glowing gas. The featured spectacular picture details an intricate tapestry of gaseous wisps and dust-laden filaments that were created and sculpted over eons by stellar winds and ancient supernovas. The Flame Nebula is visible in orange just to the Horsehead’s left. To highlight the dust and gas, most of the stars have been digitally removed, although a notable exception is Alnitak, just above the Flame Nebula, which is the rightmost star in Orion’s famous belt of three aligned stars. The Horsehead Nebula lies 1,500 light years distant towards the constellation of Orion.

 

NASA Coverage: Artemis I Mission to the Moon
Teachers & Students: Ideas for utilizing APOD in the classroom

List of Astronomy Pictures of the Day from All of 2022 to Date

If you would like to catch up on all the Astronomy Picture of the Day from January 1 to August 28, 2022 you can click on this link From apodNASA.gov

August 2 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 August 2

A Moon Dressed Like Saturn

Image Credit & Copyright: Francisco Sojuel

Explanation: Why does Saturn appear so big? It doesn’t — what is pictured are foreground clouds on Earth crossing in front of the Moon. The Moon shows a slight crescent phase with most of its surface visible by reflected Earthlight known as ashen glow. The Sun directly illuminates the brightly lit lunar crescent from the bottom, which means that the Sun must be below the horizon and so the image was taken before sunrise. This double take-inducing picture was captured on 2019 December 24, two days before the Moon slid in front of the Sun to create a solar eclipse. In the foreground, lights from small Guatemalan towns are visible behind the huge volcano Pacaya.

 

News: APOD Receives First Outreach Prize from the International Astronomical Union

July 31 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 31

Starburst Galaxy M94 from Hubble

Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA

Explanation: Why does this galaxy have a ring of bright blue stars? Beautiful island universe Messier 94 lies a mere 15 million light-years distant in the northern constellation of the Hunting Dogs (Canes Venatici). A popular target for Earth-based astronomers, the face-on spiral galaxy is about 30,000 light-years across, with spiral arms sweeping through the outskirts of its broad disk. But this Hubble Space Telescope field of view spans about 7,000 light-years across M94‘s central region. The featured close-up highlights the galaxy’s compact, bright nucleus, prominent inner dust lanes, and the remarkable bluish ring of young massive stars. The ring stars are all likely less than 10 million years old, indicating that M94 is a starburst galaxy that is experiencing an epoch of rapid star formation from inspiraling gas. The circular ripple of blue stars is likely a wave propagating outward, having been triggered by the gravity and rotation of a oval matter distributions. Because M94 is relatively nearby, astronomers can better explore details of its starburst ring.

July 30 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 30

The Eagle Rises

Image Credit: Apollo 11, NASA – Stereo Image Copyright: John Kaufmann (ALSJ)

Explanation: Get out your red/blue glasses and check out this stereo view from lunar orbit. The 3D anaglyph was created from two photographs (AS11-44-6633AS11-44-6634) taken by astronaut Michael Collins during the 1969 Apollo 11 mission. It features the lunar module ascent stage, dubbed The Eagle, rising to meet the command module in lunar orbit on July 21. Aboard the ascent stage are Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, the first to walk on the Moon. The smooth, dark area on the lunar surface is Mare Smythii located just below the equator on the extreme eastern edge of the Moon’s near side. Poised beyond the lunar horizon is our fair planet Earth.

July 29 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 29

SOFIA’s Southern Lights

Image Credit & CopyrightIan Griffin (Otago Museum)

Explanation: SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is a Boeing 747SP aircraft modified to carry a large reflecting telescope into the stratosphere. The ability of the airborne facility to climb above about 99 percent of Earth’s infrared-blocking atmosphere has allowed researchers to observe from almost anywhere over the planet. On a science mission flying deep into the southern auroral oval, astronomer Ian Griffin, director of New Zealand’s Otago Museum, captured this view from the observatory’s south facing starboard side on July 17. Bright star Canopus shines in the southern night above curtains of aurora australis, or southern lights. The plane was flying far south of New Zealand at the time at roughly 62 degrees southern latitude. Unfortunately, after a landing at Christchurch severe weather damaged SOFIA requiring repairs and the cancellation of the remainder of its final southern hemisphere deployment.

July 27 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 27

Crepuscular Moon Rays over Denmark

Image Credit & Copyright: Ruslan Merzlyakov (astrorms)

Explanation: This moon made quite an entrance. Typically, a moonrise is quiet and serene. Taking a few minutes to fully peek above the horizon, Earth’s largest orbital companion can remain relatively obscure until it rises high in the nighttime sky. About a week ago, however, and despite being only half lit by the Sun, this rising moon put on a show — at least from this location. The reason was that, as seen from Limfjord in Nykøbing MorsDenmark, the moon rose below scattered clouds near the horizon. The result, captured here in a single exposure, was that moonlight poured through gaps in the clouds to created what are called crepuscular rays. These rays can fan out dramatically across the sky when starting near the horizon, and can even appear to converge on the other side of the sky. Well behind our Moon, stars from our Milky Way galaxy dot the background, and our galaxy’s largest orbital companion — the Andromeda galaxy — can be found on the upper left.

 

Almost Hyperspace: Random APOD Generator

July 26 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 26

Comet NEOWISE Rising over the Adriatic Sea

Comet NEOWISE Rising over the Adriatic Sea
Video Credit & Copyright: Paolo GirottiExplanation: This sight was worth getting out of bed early. Two years ago this month, Comet C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE) rose before dawn to the delight of northern sky enthusiasts awake that early. Up before sunrise on July 8th, the featured photographer was able to capture in dramatic fashion one of the few comets visible to the unaided eye this century, an inner-Solar System intruder that has become known as the Great Comet of 2020. The resulting video detailed Comet NEOWISE from Italy rising over the Adriatic Sea. The time-lapse video combines over 240 images taken over 30 minutes. The comet was seen rising through a foreground of bright and undulating noctilucent clouds, and before a background of distant stars. Comet NEOWISE remained unexpectedly bright until 2020 August, with its ion and dust tails found to emanate from a nucleus spanning about five kilometers across.

Astrophysicists: Browse 2,800+ codes in the Astrophysics Source Code Library

July 25 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 25

Find the New Moon

Image Credit & Copyright: Mohamad Soltanolkotabi

Explanation: Can you find the Moon? This usually simple task can be quite difficult. Even though the Moon is above your horizon half of the time, its phase can be anything from crescent to full. The featured image was taken in late May from Sant Martí d’EmpúriesSpain, over the Mediterranean Sea in the early morning. One reason you can’t find this moon is because it is very near to its new phase, when very little of the half illuminated by the Sun is visible to the Earth. Another reason is because this moon is near the horizon and so seen through a long path of Earth’s atmosphere — a path which dims the already faint crescent. Any crescent moon is only visible near the direction the Sun, and so only locatable near sunrise or sunset. The Moon runs through all of its phases in a month (moon-th), and this month the thinnest sliver of a crescent — a new moon — will occur in three days.

July 24 Astronomy Picture of the Day

Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer.

2022 July 24

Saturn in Infrared from Cassini

Image Credit: NASAJPL-CaltechSSIProcessing: Maksim Kakitsev

Explanation: Many details of Saturn appear clearly in infrared light. Bands of clouds show great structure, including long stretching storms. Also quite striking in infrared is the unusual hexagonal cloud pattern surrounding Saturn‘s North Pole. Each side of the dark hexagon spans roughly the width of our Earth. The hexagon‘s existence was not predicted, and its origin and likely stability remains a topic of research. Saturn’s famous rings circle the planet and cast shadows below the equator. The featured image was taken by the robotic Cassini spacecraft in 2014 in several infrared colors. In 2017 September, the Cassini mission was brought to a dramatic conclusion when the spacecraft was directed to dive into ringed giant.

 

Explore Your Universe: Random APOD Generator