Celtic Calendar Lore – Ivy September 30 to October 27

From mothermoonsmessage.blogspot.com

Beginning September 30th through October 27th we celebrate the Celtic Tree month of Ivy.  Although Ivy is not what most consider a tree, it still holds its place among the others in Celtic Tree Lore.  Its uses and importance are just as strong as that of the Oak or Hazel. In the coming weeks we will examine a few of these important traits. 
Ivy is a wild evergreen climbing vine that attaches itself to other trees as well as stone walls and other surfaces. It climbs such surfaces by fibers that grow our from every part of the stem. These fibers resembles roots and have small disks at the end by which it attaches itself to the roughness of the tree or wall it is climbing. If by chance the ivy finds soil or a deep crack the fibers will then become roots. These roots act as a means to obtain nourishment for the stem as it climbs. When this is done to another tree, the ivy can actually injure the tree it is attached to by taking of the trees life resources to aid itself.
Ivy only produces flowers when the branches get above their support. The flowering branches are bushy and come out from the climbing stem with flowers at the end of each shoot. Usually an ivy will flower during Autumn if there is enough sunlight. They appear as small clusters of greenish white or yellow . They can continue to bloom until late December. There bloom is scentless yet still they are a good source of food for birds, and insects during the cooler months when there…

Ivy – symbol of strength and determination

From Ireland Calling

Ivy has many superstitions and beliefs attached to it.

Because it had the ability to form dense thickets in woodland, grow where other plants could not and block out the light from even the mighty oak, ivy was believed to be very powerful by the Druids, more powerful than its enemy, the vine and quite sinister.

Ivy tree in Celtic Mytholgy

The ivy and the vine have been seen as enemies since ancient times. This seems odd since the same Greek and Roman gods are associated with each.

Bacchus, god of wine

In Greek mythology ivy was sacred to Osiris and also associated with Dionysus. In Roman mythology Ivy was connected to Bacchus, the god of wine as it grew over his home land.

Bacchus is often portrayed wearing an ivy crown, perhaps because this was once thought to prevent intoxication. The poisonous berries of the ivy, when ground into a powder were also once believed to be a hangover cure.

The link between Bacchus and ivy was taken over to England where old English Taverns would display ivy above their doors indicating the high quality of their drinks.

The proverb ‘Good wine needs no bush’, meaning good wine speaks for itself, comes from this practice.

Gort, G – Ivy, a symbol of strength and determination to the Druids, is the twelfth letter of the ogham alphabet, gort, and the eleventh month in the Celtic tree calendar, representing September 30th to October 27th.

Protection from evil

In old Ireland ivy was thought to provide protection from evil when growing on or near to a dwelling.

However, if it should die or fall down then misfortune would fall upon those therein.

Ivy was often carried by young women for good luck and fertility. Used at weddings intertwined with holly, the ivy would symbolise fidelity and at Yule-tide, would bring peace to the household.

Ivy was also linked to inspiration and worn by poets in the form of a crown.

February 18 – March 17: Celtic Tree Month of the Ash Tree

 February 18 – March 17

Celtic Tree Month of the Ash Tree

Those born under the Celtic tree astrology sign of the Ash are free thinkers. Imaginative, intuitive, and naturally artistic, you see the world in water-color purity. You have a tendency to moody and withdrawn at times, but that’s only because your inner landscape is in constant motion. You are in touch with your muse, and you are easily inspired by nature. Likewise, you inspire all that you associate with and people seek you out for your enchanting personality. Art, writing (especially poetry), science, and theology (spiritual matters) are areas that strongly interest you. Others may think you are reclusive, but in all honesty, you are simply immersed in your own world of fantastic vision and design. You are in a constant state of self-renewal and you rarely place a value on what others think about you. Ash signs partner well with Willow and Reed signs.

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Celtic Tree Month – Reed (October 28th – November 23)

It is Now The Celtic Tree Month – Reed

Reed Moon

October 28 – November 23

Reed is typically used to make wind instruments and this time of year, its haunting sounds are sometimes heard when the souls of the dead are being summoned to the Underworld. The Reed Moon was called Negetal, pronounced by the Celtics and is some times referred to as the Elm Moon by modern Pagans. This is a time for divination and scrying. If you’re going to have a seance, this is an excellent month to do it. This month, do magickal workings related to spirit guides, energy work, meditation, celebration of death and honoroing the cycle of life and rebirth